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Ocean Deoxygenation – Another Global Challenge

"The ocean is facing unprecedented pressures that are causing massive ecosystem and nutrient cycle disruption the result of industrial-scale depletion of ocean wildlife and destabilization of steady-state ecosystems. This occurs not only on the seafloor by trawling, dredging, drilling, and mining but also in the water column with nets, long lines, fish aggregating devices and other techniques; methods introduced in recent decades to extract with unprecedented speed and scale from ecosystems hundreds of millions of years in the making.  [...]"

Source: GIS and Science
Author: Matt Artz
 

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Tropical Atlantic climate and ecosystem regime shifts during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

Abstract.

"The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 56 Ma) was a phase of rapid global warming associated with massive carbon input into the ocean–atmosphere system from a C-depleted reservoir. Many midlatitude and high-latitude sections have been studied and document changes in salinity, hydrology and sedimentation, deoxygenation, biotic overturning, and migrations, but detailed records from tropical regions are lacking. [...]"

Source: Climate of the Past
Authors: Joost Frieling et al.
DOI: 10.5194/cp-14-39-2018

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Oxygen loss strains marine ecosystems

A new review highlights the impact of declining oxygen levels in the open ocean and coastal waters due to increasing temperatures and nutrient discharge.

 

"Half of the world’s oxygen originates from the ocean. Yet, worldwide, the amount of open ocean without any oxygen has quadrupled over the past 50 years. Oxygen-minimum zones have expanded by several million square kilometres, increasing by more than 10-fold since 1950.  [...]"

Source: nature Middle East
Author: Lakshini Mendis
DOI: 10.1038/nmiddleeast.2018.2

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Intensification and deepening of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone in response to increase in Indian monsoon wind intensity

Abstract.

"The decline in oxygen supply to the ocean associated with global warming is expected to expand oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This global trend can be attenuated or amplified by regional processes. In the Arabian Sea, the world's thickest OMZ is highly vulnerable to changes in the Indian monsoon wind. Evidence from paleo-records and future climate projections indicates strong variations of the Indian monsoon wind intensity over climatic timescales. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Zouhair Lachkar, Marina Lévy, and Shafer Smith
DOI: 10.5194/bg-15-159-2018

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Oceans suffocating as huge dead zones quadruple since 1950, scientists warn

Areas starved of oxygen in open ocean and by coasts have soared in recent decades, risking dire consequences for marine life and humanity

 

"Ocean dead zones with zero oxygen have quadrupled in size since 1950, scientists have warned, while the number of very low oxygen sites near coasts have multiplied tenfold. Most sea creatures cannot survive in these zones and current trends would lead to mass extinction in the long run, risking dire consequences for the hundreds of millions of people who depend on the sea. [...]"

Source: The Guardian

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Declining oxygen in the global ocean and coastal waters

Abstract.

"Oxygen is fundamental to life. Not only is it essential for the survival of individual animals, but it regulates global cycles of major nutrients and carbon. The oxygen content of the open ocean and coastal waters has been declining for at least the past half-century, largely because of human activities that have increased global temperatures and nutrients discharged to coastal waters. [...]"

Source: Science
Authors: Denise Breitburg et al.
DOI: 10.1126/science.aam7240

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Physiological and ecological implications of ocean deoxygenation for vision in marine organisms

Abstract.

"Climate change has induced ocean deoxygenation and exacerbated eutrophication-driven hypoxia in recent decades, affecting the physiology, behaviour and ecology of marine organisms. The high oxygen demand of visual tissues and the known inhibitory effects of hypoxia on human vision raise the questions if and how ocean deoxygenation alters vision in marine organisms.  [...]"

Source: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A
Authors: Lillian R. McCormick, Lisa A. Levin
DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2016.0322

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Evaluating the promise and pitfalls of a potential climate change–tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California

Abstract.

"Marine fishery stakeholders are beginning to consider and implement adaptation strategies in the face of growing consumer demand and potential deleterious climate change impacts such as ocean warming, ocean acidification, and deoxygenation. This study investigates the potential for development of a novel climate change-tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California based on Strongylocentrotus fragilis (pink sea urchin), a deep-sea species whose peak density was found to coincide with a current trap-based spot prawn fishery (Pandalus platyceros) in the 200–300-m depth range. [...]"

Source: ICES Journal of Marine Science
Authors: Kirk N Sato et al.
DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsx225

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Patterns of deoxygenation: sensitivity to natural and anthropogenic drivers

Abstract.

"Observational estimates and numerical models both indicate a significant overall decline in marine oxygen levels over the past few decades. Spatial patterns of oxygen change, however, differ considerably between observed and modelled estimates. Particularly in the tropical thermocline that hosts open-ocean oxygen minimum zones, observations indicate a general oxygen decline, whereas most of the state-of-the-art models simulate increasing oxygen levels. Possible reasons for the apparent model-data discrepancies are examined. [...]"

Source: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Socie
Authors: Andreas Oschlies et al.
DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2016.0325

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Ocean deoxygenation – a climate-related problem

"Many take for granted low oxygen as “just another water-quality issue”. Excessive loads of nutrients from non-point and point sources, including sewage, enter aquatic ecosystems where they increase biological oxygen demand and promote eutrophic conditions that can lead to periods of hypoxia or anoxia (in coastal areas somewhat misnamed as “dead zones”). [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Authors: Karin E Limburg, Denise Breitburg, Lisa A Levin
DOI: 10.1002/fee.1728

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