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Shallow- and deep-ocean Fe cycling and redox evolution across the Pliensbachian–Toarcian boundary and Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Panthalassa

Abstract.

"The late Pliensbachian to early Toarcian was characterized by major climatic and environmental changes, encompassing the early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, or Jenkyns Event, ∼183 Ma) and the preceding Pliensbachian–Toarcian boundary event (Pl/To). Information on seawater redox conditions through this time interval has thus far come mainly from European sections deposited in hydrographically restricted basins, and hence our understanding of the redox evolution of the open ocean (and in particular Panthalassa – the largest ocean to have existed) is limited. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Wenhan Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117959

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Calcium isotope ratios of malformed foraminifera reveal biocalcification stress preceded Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

Abstract. 

"Ocean acidification causes biocalcification stress. The calcium isotope composition of carbonate producers can archive such stress because calcium isotope fractionation is sensitive to precipitation rate. Here, we synthesize morphometric observations of planktic foraminifera with multi-archive calcium isotope records from Gubbio, Italy and the Western Interior Seaway spanning Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (~94 million years ago). Calcium isotope ratios increase ~60 thousand years prior to the event. [...]". 

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Gabriella D. Kitch et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00641-0

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Carbon pump dynamics and limited organic carbon burial during OAE1a

Abstract. 

"Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) are conspicuous intervals in the geologic record that are associated with the deposition of organic carbon (OC)-rich marine sediment, linked to extreme biogeochemical perturbations, and characterized by widespread ocean deoxygenation. Mechanistic links between the marine biological carbon pump (BCP), redox conditions, and organic carbon burial during OAEs, however, remain poorly constrained. In this work we reconstructed the BCP in the western Tethys Ocean across OAE1a (~120 Mya) using sediment geochemistry and OC mass accumulation rates (OCAcc). [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Kohen W. Bauer et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12538

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Environmental change and carbon-cycle dynamics during the onset of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional system

Abstract. 

"We report the first high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical record of the negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) at the onset of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional environment, analysed from a well core from c. 2500 m depth, 100 km offshore Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Time-series analysis of stable oxygen isotope values and concentrations of Si, Al, and Ti resulted in durations of the C3 and C4 segments of the CIE that support relative completeness of the C3 segment and high sediment preservation rates of c. 13 cm/kyr of the studied sedimentary sequence. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Thomas Steuber et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2022.111086

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LIP volcanism (not anoxia) tracked by Cr isotopes during Ocean Anoxic Event 2 in the proto-North Atlantic region

Abstract.

"Chromium is a redox sensitive element that exhibits a large range of isotopic compositions in Earth’s surface environments because of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) transformations. This property of Cr has been exploited as a tracer of Earth’s oxygenation history using marine sediments. However, paleoredox applications using Cr are difficult to implement due to its complicated cycling, which creates spatial variability in seawater δ53Cr values. Applications are further hindered by the potential for variability in the major inputs of Cr, such as submarine volcanism, to mask redox processes. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Lucien Nana Yobo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.06.016

Read the full article here.


Major sulfur cycle perturbations in the Panthalassic Ocean across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary and the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event

Abstract. 

"The early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, ~183 Ma) was characterized by marine deoxygenation and the burial of organic-rich sediments at numerous localities worldwide. However, the extent of marine anoxia and its impact on the sulfur cycle during the T-OAE is currently poorly understood. Here, stable sulfur isotopes of reduced metal-bound sulfur (δ34Spyrite) and pyrite sulfur concentrations (SPY) have been analyzed across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (Pl-To) and the T-OAE from the Sakahogi and Sakuraguchi-dani sections (Japan), which were deposited in the deep and shallow Panthalassic Ocean, respectively. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Wenhan Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103884

Read the full article here.


The palynology of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event at Dormettingen, southwest Germany, with emphasis on changes in vegetational dynamics

Abstract.

"The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE; ~ 183 Ma) represents an episode of marine anoxia that lasted for several hundred thousand years. Abiotic factorscontributing to the formation of the T-OAE, such as global warming, changes in weathering intensity, or sea-level change, are associated with a marked change in carbon cycling. While these factors are well studied, detailed palynological data, including marine and terrestrial palynomorphs, is still missing. Here we present comprehensive palynological data from the sedimentologically and geochemically well constrained T-OAE section in Dormettingen (SW Germany). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Francesca Galasso et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.revpalbo.2022.104701

Read the full article here.


Intensive peatland wildfires during the Aptian–Albian oceanic anoxic event 1b: Evidence from borehole SK-2 in the Songliao Basin, NE China

Abstract. 

"The Cretaceous has been considered a “high-fire” world accompanied by widespread by-products of combustion in the rock record. The mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 1b (OAE1b) is marked by one of the major perturbations in the global carbon cycle characterized by deposition of organic-rich sediments in both marine and terrestrial settings. However, our understanding is still limited on changes in wildfire activity during OAE1b period. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Zhi-Hui Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jop.2022.06.002

Read the full article here.


Isotopic evidence for changes in the mercury and zinc cycles during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 in the northwestern Tethys, Austria

Abstract. 

"The Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2, ca. 94 Ma) was one of the most extreme carbon cycle and climatic perturbations of the Phanerozoic Eon. Widespread deposition of organic-rich shales during OAE 2 has been attributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric CO2, global heating, and marine anoxia triggered by intense large igneous province (LIP) volcanism. Here, we present new Hg and Zn elemental and isotopic analyses from samples spanning OAE 2 in a hemipelagic section from Rehkogelgraben, Austria, which was part of the north-western Tethys. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Hanwei Yao et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103881

Read the full article here.


Uranium isotope reconstruction of ocean deoxygenation during OAE 2 hampered by uncertainties in fractionation factors and local U-cycling

Abstract. 

"A δ238U record of changing ocean anoxia during OAE 2 is reconstructed using seawater derived U in pelagic marine sediments in the Portland #1 core in the south-central region of the Western Interior Seaway of North America. The peak negative excursion of 1.4‰ in authigenic sedimentary δ238U values is consistent with expansion of marine anoxia during the event, but the size of the shift is much larger than the negative excursions recorded in two other published records. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Brayden S. McDonald et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.05.010

Read the full article here.


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