News

Re-Evaluating Hydrogen Sulfide as a Sink for Cadmium and Zinc in the Oxic to Suboxic Upper Water Column of the Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"Hydrogen sulfide is produced by heterotrophic bacteria in anoxic waters and via carbonyl sulfide hydrolysis and phytoplankton emissions under oxic conditions. Apparent losses of dissolved cadmium (dCd) and zinc (dZn) in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans have been attributed to metal-sulfide precipitation formed via dissimilatory sulfate reduction. It has also been argued that such a removal process could be a globally important sink for dCd and dZn. However, our studies from the North Pacific OMZ show that dissolved and particulate sulfide concentrations are insufficient to support the removal of dCd via precipitation. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Nicole Buckley et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023GB007881

Read the full article here.


Adjusting metabolic rates and critical oxygen tension in planktonic copepods under increasing hypoxia in highly productive coastal upwelling zones

Abstract.

"Ongoing ocean deoxygenation is threatening marine organisms globally. In eastern boundary upwelling systems, planktonic copepods dominate the epipelagic zooplankton, being crucial in the marine food web. Yet, they must cope with severe hypoxia caused by shoaling of the oxygen minimum zone. Based on laboratory experiments during 2021, we found differential responses in the metabolic rate (MR) and critical oxygen partial pressure of three abundant copepods. Calanoides patagoniensis doubled its MR during the upwelling season, so better exploiting the spring phytoplankton bloom for feeding and reproduction while maintaining their critical oxygen partial pressure unchanged between seasons. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Leissing Frederick et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.12556

Read the full article here.


The global energy transition offers new options for mitigation of coastal hypoxia: Do we know enough?

Abstract.

"The mitigation of climate change and pollution-related hypoxia and anoxia is a growing challenge for coastal communities. Known ocean conservation measures do not show the desired fast results counteracting deoxygenation. The new infrastructure related to the coastal production of renewable energies linked to the production of green hydrogen can provide new possibilities of artificial ocean reoxygenation to mitigate coastal hypoxia, but has to be treated urgently and seriously from different scientific, engineering and socio-economic angles. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Patricia Handmann & Douglas Wallace
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.17228

Read the full article here.


Intra-colony spatial variance of oxyregulation and hypoxic thresholds for key Acropora coral species

Abstract.

"Oxygen (O2) availability is essential for healthy coral reef functioning, yet how continued loss of dissolved O2 via ocean deoxygenation impacts performance of reef building corals remains unclear. Here, we examine how intra-colony spatial geometry of important Great Barrier Reef (GBR) coral species Acropora may influence variation in hypoxic thresholds for upregulation, to better understand capacity to tolerate future reductions in O2 availability. We first evaluate the application of more streamlined models used to parameterise Hypoxia Response Curve data, models that have been used historically to identify variable oxyregulatory capacity. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Nicole J. Dilernia et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.11100

Read the full article here.


The Ocean's Meridional Oxygen Transport

Abstract.

"Quantification of oxygen uptake at the ocean surface and its surface-to-interior pathways is crucial for understanding oxygen concentration change in a warming ocean. We investigate the mean meridional global oxygen transport between 1950 and 2009 using coupled physical-biogeochemical model output. We introduce a streamfunction in latitude-oxygen coordinates to reduce complexity in the description of the mean meridional oxygen pathways. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Esther Portela et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023JC020259

Read the full article here.


Whole transcriptome analysis of demersal fish eggs reveals complex responses to ocean deoxygenation and acidification

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification and deoxygenation co-occur in marine environments, causing deterioration of marine ecosystems. However, effects of compound stresses on marine organisms and their physiological coping mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show how high pCO2 and low dissolved oxygen (DO) cause transcriptomic changes in eggs of a demersal fish (Sillago japonica), which are fully exposed to such stresses in natural environment. Overall gene expression was affected more strongly by low DO than by high pCO2. Enrichment analysis detected significant stress responses such as glycolytic processes in response to low DO. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Akira Iguchi et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.169484

Read the full article here.


Enhanced ocean deoxygenation in the Bering Sea during MIS 11c

Abstract.

"Accelerated Arctic warming has raised concerns about future environmental conditions in the Bering Sea, one of the world's most productive marine ecosystems. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 (424–374 ka), a period with orbital parameters similar to those of the current interglacial (Holocene), is thought to be a suitable analog to predict future marine environments. Here, we reconstruct paleoredox changes in the Bering Sea over the last 800 kyr using high-resolution U/Th ratios from four sites, which were sampled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 323. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Xuguang Feng et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2023.111982

Read the full article here.


Linking northeastern North Pacific oxygen changes to upstream surface outcrop variations

Abstract.

"Understanding the response of the ocean to global warming, including the renewal of ocean waters from the surface (ventilation), is important for future climate predictions. Oxygen distributions in the ocean thermocline have proven an effective way to infer changes in ventilation because physical processes (ventilation and circulation) that supply oxygen are thought to be primarily responsible for changes in interior oxygen concentrations. Here, the focus is on the North Pacific thermocline, where some of the world's oceans' largest oxygen variations have been observed. [...]".

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Sabine Mecking & Kyla Drushka
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-1117-2024

Read the full article here.


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