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Short-term variability of dissolved rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in the entire water column of the Panama Basin

Abstract.

"The distribution of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) and neodymium isotopes (εNd) in the open ocean traces water mass mixing and provides information on lithogenic inputs to the source regions of the water masses. However, the processes influencing the REE budget at the ocean margins, in particular source and sink mechanisms, are not yet well quantified. In this study the first dissolved REE concentrations and Nd isotope compositions of seawater from the Panama Basin (RV Meteor cruise M90) in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) are presented. The EEP is characterized by one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). It is dominated by high particle fluxes that are expected to enhance the removal of REEs from the water column by scavenging. [...]"

Source: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Authors: P.Grasse et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2017.07.022

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Role of zooplankton in determining the efficiency of the biological carbon pump

Abstract.

"The efficiency of the ocean's biological carbon pump (BCPeff – here the product of particle export and transfer efficiencies) plays a key role in the air–sea partitioning of CO2. Despite its importance in the global carbon cycle, the biological processes that control BCPeff are poorly known. We investigate the potential role that zooplankton play in the biological carbon pump using both in situ observations and model output. Observed and modelled estimates of fast, slow, and total sinking fluxes are presented from three oceanic sites: the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, the temperate North Atlantic, and the equatorial Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ)."

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Emma L. Cavan et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-14-177-2017

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A model study of warming-induced phosphorus–oxygen feedbacks in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones on millennial timescales

Abstract.

"Observations indicate an expansion of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) over the past 50 years, likely related to ongoing deoxygenation caused by reduced oxygen solubility, changes in stratification and circulation, and a potential acceleration of organic matter turnover in a warming climate. The overall area of ocean sediments that are in direct contact with low-oxygen bottom waters also increases with expanding OMZs. This leads to a release of phosphorus from ocean sediments. If anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, higher temperatures will cause enhanced weathering on land, which, in turn, will increase the phosphorus and alkalinity fluxes into the ocean and therefore raise the ocean's phosphorus inventory even further. [...]"

Source: Earth System Dynamics
Authors: Daniela Niemeyer, Tronje P. Kemena, Katrin J. Meissner, and Andreas Oschlies
DOI: 10.5194/esd-8-357-2017

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Biological nitrogen fixation in the oxygen-minimum region of the eastern tropical North Pacific ocean

Abstract.

"Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) was investigated above and within the oxygen-depleted waters of the oxygen-minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Ocean. BNF rates were estimated using an isotope tracer method that overcame the uncertainty of the conventional bubble method by directly measuring the tracer enrichment during the incubations. Highest rates of BNF (~4 nM day−1) occurred in coastal surface waters and lowest detectable rates (~0.2 nM day−1) were found in the anoxic region of offshore stations. [...]"

Source: The ISME Journal
Authors: Amal Jayakuma et al.
DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2017.97

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Cryptic oxygen cycling in anoxic marine zones

Abstract.

"Oxygen availability drives changes in microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling between the aerobic surface layer and the anaerobic core in nitrite-rich anoxic marine zones (AMZs), which constitute huge oxygen-depleted regions in the tropical oceans. The current paradigm is that primary production and nitrification within the oxic surface layer fuel anaerobic processes in the anoxic core of AMZs, where 30–50% of global marine nitrogen loss takes place. Here we demonstrate that oxygenic photosynthesis in the secondary chlorophyll maximum (SCM) releases significant amounts of O2 to the otherwise anoxic environment. [...] "

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS)
Authors: Emilio Garcia-Robledo et al.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1619844114

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Decadal oxygen change in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

Abstract.

"Repeat shipboard and multi-year moored observations obtained in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) were used to study the decadal change in oxygen for the period 2006–2015. Along 23° W between 6 and 14° N, oxygen decreased with a rate of −5.9 ± 3.5 µmol kg−1 decade−1 within the depth covering the deep oxycline (200–400 m), while below the OMZ core (400–1000 m) oxygen increased by 4.0 ± 1.6 µmol kg−1 decade−1 on average. The inclusion of these decadal oxygen trends in the recently estimated oxygen budget for the ETNA OMZ suggests a weakened ventilation of the upper 400 m, whereas the ventilation strengthened homogeneously below 400 m. [...]"

Source: Ocean Science
Authors: Johannes Hahn, Peter Brandt, Sunke Schmidtko and Gerd Krahmann
DOI: 10.5194/os-13-551-2017

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Low oxygen eddies in the eastern tropical North Atlantic: Implications for N2O cycling

Abstract.

"Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a climate relevant trace gas, and its production in the ocean generally increases under suboxic conditions. The Atlantic Ocean is well ventilated, and unlike the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, dissolved oxygen and N2O concentrations in the Atlantic OMZ are relatively high and low, respectively. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: D. S. Grundle et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-04745-y

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Oxygen minimum zone: An important oceanographic habitat for deep-diving northern elephant seals

Abstract.

"Little is known about the foraging behavior of top predators in the deep mesopelagic ocean. Elephant seals dive to the deep biota-poor oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) (>800 m depth) despite high diving costs in terms of energy and time, but how they successfully forage in the OMZ remains largely unknown. Assessment of their feeding rate is the key to understanding their foraging behavior, but this has been challenging. Here, we assessed the feeding rate of 14 female northern elephant seals determined by jaw motion events (JME) and dive cycle time to examine how feeding rates varied with dive depth, particularly in the OMZ. [...]"

Source: Ecology and Evolution
Authors: Yasuhiko Naito et al.
DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3202

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Glacial-Interglacial changes and Holocene variations in Arabian Sea denitrification

Abstract.

"At present the Arabian Sea has a permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at water depths between about 100 m and 1200 m. Active denitrification in this OMZ is recorded by enhanced δ15N values in the sediments. Sediment cores show a δ15N increase from early to late Holocene which is contrary to the trend in other regions of water column denitrification. We calculated composite sea surface temperature (SST) and δ15N in time slices of 1000 years of the last 25 ka to better understand the reasons for the establishment of the Arabian Sea OMZ and its response to changes in the Asian monsoon system. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences (under review)
Authors: Birgit Gaye et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-2017-256

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Community composition of nitrous oxide consuming bacteria in the oxygen minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

Abstract.

"The ozone-depleting and greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), is mainly consumed by the microbially mediated anaerobic process, denitrification. N2O consumption is the last step in canonical denitrification, and is also the least O2 tolerant step. Community composition of total and active N2O consuming bacteria was analyzed based on total (DNA) and transcriptionally active (RNA) nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) genes using a functional gene microarray. The total and active nosZ communities were dominated by a limited number of nosZ archetypes, affiliated with bacteria from marine, soil and marsh environments. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Microbiology
Authors: Xin Sun, Amal Jayakumar and Bess B. Ward
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2017.01183

Full article


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