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Disparity between Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and Toarcian carbon isotope excursion

Abstract.

"The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, Early Jurassic) is marked by widespread marine deoxygenation and deposition of organic carbon (OC)-rich strata. The genesis of the T-OAE is thought to be associated with environmental changes caused by the emission of 12C-enriched greenhouse gasses (CO2, CH4), manifested in a negative Toarcian carbon isotope excursion (nT-CIE). The nT-CIE is commonly used to stratigraphically define the T-OAE, and despite the complex interrelationship of the different environmental phenomena, both terms (nT-CIE and T-OAE) are commonly used interchangeable. [...]".

 

Source: Springer Nature
Authors: Wolfgang Ruebsam & Lorenz Schwark 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00531-024-02408-8

Read the full article here.


Marine anoxia initiates giant sulfur-oxidizing bacterial mat proliferation and associated changes in benthic nitrogen, sulfur, and iron cycling...

Full title: "Marine anoxia initiates giant sulfur-oxidizing bacterial mat proliferation and associated changes in benthic nitrogen, sulfur, and iron cycling in the Santa Barbara Basin, California Borderland"

Abstract.

"The Santa Barbara Basin naturally experiences transient deoxygenation due to its unique geological setting in the southern California Borderland and seasonal changes in ocean currents. Long-term measurements of the basin showed that anoxic events and subsequent nitrate exhaustion in the bottom waters have been occurring more frequently [...]".

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: David J. Yousavich et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-789-2024

Read the full article here.


The past to unravel the future: Deoxygenation events in the geological archive and the anthropocene oxygen crisis

Abstract.

"Despite the observation that we are witnessing a true oxygen crisis, the ocean deoxygenation theme is getting less attention from the media and population compared to other environmental stressors concerning climate change. The current ocean oxygen crisis is characterized by a complex interplay of climatic, biological, and oceanographic processes acting at different time scales. Earth system models offer insights into future deoxygenation events and their potential extent [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Alan Maria Mancini et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2023.104664

Read the full article here.


The early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Jenkyns Event) in the Alpine-Mediterranean Tethys, north African margin...

Full title: "The early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Jenkyns Event) in the Alpine-Mediterranean Tethys, north African margin, and north European epicontinental seaway"

Abstract.

"The early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Jenkyns Event) was associated with major world-wide climatic changes with profound effects on the global carbon cycle. This review revisits the available literature covering the Jenkyns Event applying an updated common stratigraphic definition, allowing illustration of the development and evolution of anoxia in the Alpine-Mediterranean Tethys [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Gabriele Gambacorta et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2023.104636

Read the full article here.


Sensitivity of the thermohaline circulation during the Messinian: Toward constraining the dynamics of Mediterranean deoxygenation

Abstract.

"During the Messinian, the sensitivity of the Mediterranean Basin to ecosystem perturbation was enhanced in response to the progressive restriction of water exchange with the Atlantic Ocean. The widespread deposition of organic-rich layers (i.e. sapropel) during the Messinian testifies the perturbation of the carbon and oxygen cycles; indeed, these sediments were deposited under conditions of oxygen starvation, presumably in response to a periodic deterioration of the thermohaline circulation strength. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Alan Maria Mancini et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2023.104217

Read the full article here.


Carbonate-hosted manganese deposits and ocean anoxia

Abstract.

"Late Devonian (ca. 360 Ma), Early Carboniferous (ca. 330 Ma), and Early Triassic (ca. 250 Ma) manganese deposits in the South China Block support an emerging view that some Mn carbonates form through direct synsedimentary (authigenic) precipitation. These Mn carbonates accumulated on distal shelves and are interbedded with lime mudstone and heterozoan carbonates that accumulated in coastal upwelling environments. Lithofacies, Ce anomalies combined with vanadium, uranium, and molybdenum enrichments indicate that the Mn carbonates were primarily precipitated under anoxic conditions. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Fangge Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2023.118385

Read the full article here.


Stratigraphic architecture of the Tethyan Cenomanian-Turonian succession and OAE2 in the Dokan Area, Kurdistan Region, northeast Iraq

Abstract.

"This study provides a detailed examination of a condensed Cenomanian-Turonian (C-T) succession of two sections (Dokan Dam and Khalakan) in the Kurdistan Region, Northeastern Iraq, based on biostratigraphy (calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifera), carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry, and facies analysis. The C/T boundary in this region is characterized by a hiatus noticeable due to the absence of the Globigerinelloides benthonensis and Dicarinella hagni subzones and the lack of positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) peak b during the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Fadhil A. Lawa et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2023.105064

Read the full article here.


Carbonate uranium isotopes across Cretaceous OAE 2 in southern Mexico: New constraints on the global spread of marine anoxia and organic carbon burial

Abstract.

"Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) represent discrete intervals of decreased marine oxygen concentrations often associated with volcanism, enhanced organic carbon burial coupled with positive δ13C excursions, and significant biotic turnover. Cretaceous OAE 2 (ca. 94 Mya) is especially notable for globally-distributed changes in calcareous invertebrate and plankton populations. While the presence of organic-rich facies is consistent with locally anoxic environments in many cases, determining the global extent of anoxia is more problematic. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Joseph T. Kulenguski et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2023.111756

Read the full article here.


Expansion of Ocean Anoxia During Glacial Periods Recorded in the Cobalt Flux to Pelagic Sediments

Abstract.

"The expansion of oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) within the ocean's interior is anticipated to be a major consequence of anthropogenic climate change, but past changes in ODZs are poorly defined. Recent mapping efforts have revealed plumes of the redox-active metal cobalt within ODZs, driving a basin-scale correlation between high cobalt and low O2. Here, we investigate the cobalt flux to Equatorial Pacific sediments along the Line Islands Ridge as a novel record of basin-scale fluctuations in ODZ extent. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Nicholas J. Hawco & Rhea K. Foreman
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023GL105135

Read the full article here.


Sulfur isotopic evidence for global marine anoxia and low seawater sulfate concentration during the Late Triassic

Abstract.

"Marine anoxia during the Late Triassic has mostly been reported from the western Tethysand Panthalassa, which were near the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), but whether it developed in global open oceans (e.g., the eastern Tethys) is unknown. Whether the marine anoxia was global or regional requires more research. Here, we present carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) and pyrite δ34Spy data for the Late Triassic–Early Jurassic interval from the Wenquan Section in Qiantang Basin, Tibet. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Wei Tang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jseaes.2023.105659

Read the full article here.


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