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Evaluating the promise and pitfalls of a potential climate change–tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California

Abstract.

"Marine fishery stakeholders are beginning to consider and implement adaptation strategies in the face of growing consumer demand and potential deleterious climate change impacts such as ocean warming, ocean acidification, and deoxygenation. This study investigates the potential for development of a novel climate change-tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California based on Strongylocentrotus fragilis (pink sea urchin), a deep-sea species whose peak density was found to coincide with a current trap-based spot prawn fishery (Pandalus platyceros) in the 200–300-m depth range. [...]"

Source: ICES Journal of Marine Science
Authors: Kirk N Sato et al.
DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsx225

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Deep oceans may acidify faster than anticipated due to global warming

Abstract.

"Oceans worldwide are undergoing acidification due to the penetration of anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere. The rate of acidification generally diminishes with increasing depth. Yet, slowing down of the thermohaline circulation due to global warming could reduce the pH in the deep oceans, as more organic material would decompose with a longer residence time. [...]"

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Chen-Tung Arthur Chen
DOI: 10.1038/s41558-017-0003-y

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Ocean deoxygenation – a climate-related problem

"Many take for granted low oxygen as “just another water-quality issue”. Excessive loads of nutrients from non-point and point sources, including sewage, enter aquatic ecosystems where they increase biological oxygen demand and promote eutrophic conditions that can lead to periods of hypoxia or anoxia (in coastal areas somewhat misnamed as “dead zones”). [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Authors: Karin E Limburg, Denise Breitburg, Lisa A Levin
DOI: 10.1002/fee.1728

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Ocean acidification could doom key Arctic fish species: study

Ocean acidification combined with warming of the world oceans and loss of oxygen is having a severe impact on key Arctic marine species such as polar cod in the Barents Sea, according to a new study conducted by German scientists.

 

"The eight-year interdisciplinary study, which began in 2009 and involved more than 250 scientist in the German research network on ocean acidification BIOACID (Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification), investigated how different marine species respond to ocean acidification – a change in the ocean chemistry that occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere dissolves in seawater.

In addition to ocean acidification, the study, Exploring Ocean Change: Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification, also examined the cascading effect of other stressors such as ocean warming, deoxygenation, overfishing and eutrophication – the increased concentration of nutrients in estuaries and coastal waters that causes harmful algal blooms, ocean dead zones and fish kills. [...]"

Source: The Independent Barents Observer

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Sound physiological knowledge and principles in modeling shrinking of fishes under climate change

Abstract.

"One of the main expected responses of marine fishes to ocean warming is decrease in body size, as supported by evidence from empirical data and theoretical modeling. The theoretical underpinning for fish shrinking is that the oxygen supply to large fish size cannot be met by their gills, whose surface area cannot keep up with the oxygen demand by their three-dimensional bodies. [...]"

Source: Global Change Biology
Authors: Daniel Pauly, William W. L. Cheung
DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13831

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Using fuzzy logic to determine the vulnerability of marine species to climate change

Abstract.

"Marine species are being impacted by climate change and ocean acidification, although their level of vulnerability varies due to differences in species' sensitivity, adaptive capacity and exposure to climate hazards. Due to limited data on the biological and ecological attributes of many marine species, as well as inherent uncertainties in the assessment process, climate change vulnerability assessments in the marine environment frequently focus on a limited number of taxa or geographic ranges. [...]"

Source: Global Change Biology
Authors: Miranda C. Jones, William W. L. Cheung
DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13869

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Climate change and ocean deoxygenation within intensified surface-driven upwelling circulations

Abstract.

"Ocean deoxygenation often takes place in proximity to zones of intense upwelling. Associated concerns about amplified ocean deoxygenation arise from an arguable likelihood that coastal upwelling systems in the world's oceans may further intensify as anthropogenic climate change proceeds. Comparative examples discussed include the uniquely intense seasonal Somali Current upwelling, the massive upwelling that occurs quasi-continuously off Namibia and the recently appearing and now annually recurring ‘dead zone’ off the US State of Oregon. [...]"

Source: The Royal Society
Author: Andrew Bakun
DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2016.0327

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U.N. Moved to Protect 60% of the Ocean and the World Hardly Noticed

"After years of talks, the U.N. has taken a major step toward an international treaty to preserve the biodiversity of the high seas to combat climate change, overfishing and plastic pollution.

[...] The move, which ended two weeks of sometimes contentious talks to hash out the major elements of the treaty, could result in far-reaching protections for marine life through the creation of reserves and other actions designed to blunt threats to ocean health from climate change, over-fishing and pollution. The high seas constitute the nearly 60 percent of the ocean beyond any nation’s jurisdiction. They play a crucial role in the global climate, food supply and economy, yet are largely beyond the reach of the law. [...]"

Source: Newsdeeply

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Report: High seas in high danger as ecological tipping point nears

"As delegates convene at the United Nations to work out an international treaty to preserve the biodiversity of the high seas, a new report underscores the need to protect the remote ocean.

Scientists at Oxford University in the United Kingdom reviewed 271 research papers published between 2012 and 2017 and synthesized the latest data on the impact of climate change, fishing and pollution on the high seas. Their findings are not encouraging: Even the most distant reaches of the ocean are suffering from chemical and plastic contamination, a loss of biodiversity and the consequences of rising temperatures. [...]"

Source: UPI

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