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On the effect of low oxygen concentrations on bacterial degradation of sinking particles

Abstract.

"In marine oxygen (O2) minimum zones (OMZs), the transfer of particulate organic carbon (POC) to depth via the biological carbon pump might be enhanced as a result of slower remineralisation under lower dissolved O2 concentrations (DO). In parallel, nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere through microbial processes, such as denitrification and anammox, is directly linked to particulate nitrogen (PN) export.  [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Frédéric A. C. Le Moigne
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-16903-3

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Repeated storage of respired carbon in the equatorial Pacific Ocean over the last three glacial cycles

Abstract.

"As the largest reservoir of carbon exchanging with the atmosphere on glacial–interglacial timescales, the deep ocean has been implicated as the likely location of carbon sequestration during Pleistocene glaciations. Despite strong theoretical underpinning for this expectation, radiocarbon data on watermass ventilation ages conflict, and proxy interpretations disagree about the depth, origin and even existence of the respired carbon pool. [...]"

Authors: A.W. Jacobel
Source: Nature Communications
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01938-x

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Oxygenation as a driver of the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

Abstract.

"The largest radiation of Phanerozoic marine animal life quadrupled genus-level diversity towards the end of the Ordovician Period about 450 million years ago. A leading hypothesis for this Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event is that cooling of the Ordovician climate lowered sea surface temperatures into the thermal tolerance window of many animal groups, such as corals. [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Cole T. Edwards
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-017-0006-3

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A dynamic microbial community with high functional redundancy inhabits the cold, oxic subseafloor aquifer

Abstract.

"The rock-hosted subseafloor crustal aquifer harbors a reservoir of microbial life that may influence global marine biogeochemical cycles. Here we utilized metagenomic libraries of crustal fluid samples from North Pond, located on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a site with cold, oxic subseafloor fluid circulation within the upper basement to query microbial diversity. [...]"

Source: The ISME Journal
Authors: Benjamin J. Tully et al.
DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2017.187

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A strong case for limiting climate change

"As a gigantic carbon sink, the ocean has taken up about a third of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere by human activities. But when absorbed by seawater, the greenhouse gas triggers chemical reactions, causing the ocean to acidify. Ocean acidification affects ecosystems and important services the ocean provides to humankind. This includes the regulation of the Earth's climate, food provision, recreation as well as biodiversity as a condition for intact and functioning ecosystems. [...]"

Source: EurekAlert

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Methane fluxes from coastal sediments are enhanced by macrofauna

Abstract.

"Methane and nitrous oxide are potent greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to climate change. Coastal sediments are important GHG producers, but the contribution of macrofauna (benthic invertebrates larger than 1 mm) inhabiting them is currently unknown. Through a combination of trace gas, isotope, and molecular analyses, we studied the direct and indirect contribution of two macrofaunal groups, polychaetes and bivalves, to methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from coastal sediments. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Stefano Bonaglia et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-13263-w

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Pteropods are excellent recorders of surface temperature and carbonate ion concentration

Abstract.

"Pteropods are among the first responders to ocean acidification and warming, but have not yet been widely explored as carriers of marine paleoenvironmental signals. In order to characterize the stable isotopic composition of aragonitic pteropod shells and their variation in response to climate change parameters, such as seawater temperature, pteropod shells (Heliconoides inflatus) were collected along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean (31° N to 38° S). [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: N. Keul et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-11708-w

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The possible roles of algae in restricting the increase in atmospheric CO2 and global temperature

Abstract.

"Anthropogenic inputs are increasing the CO2 content of the atmosphere, and the CO2 and total inorganic C in the surface ocean and, to a lesser degree, the deep ocean. The greenhouse effect of the increased CO2 (and, to a lesser extent, other greenhouse gases) is very probably the major cause of present global warming. The warming increases temperature of the atmosphere and the surface ocean to a greater extent than the deep ocean, with shoaling of the thermocline, decreasing nutrient flux to the surface ocean where there is greater mean photosynthetic photon flux density. [...]"

Source: European Journal of Phycology 
Author: John A. Raven
DOI: 10.1080/09670262.2017.1362593

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Biodiversity response to natural gradients of multiple stressors on continental margins

Abstract.

"Sharp increases in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation that threaten marine organisms on continental margins and their ecological functions and resulting ecosystem services. The relative influence of these stressors on biodiversity remains unclear, as well as the threshold levels for change and when secondary stressors become important.  [...]"

Source: Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Authors: Erik A. Sperling, Christina A. Frieder, Lisa A. Levin
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.0637

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Role of zooplankton in determining the efficiency of the biological carbon pump

Abstract.

"The efficiency of the ocean's biological carbon pump (BCPeff – here the product of particle export and transfer efficiencies) plays a key role in the air–sea partitioning of CO2. Despite its importance in the global carbon cycle, the biological processes that control BCPeff are poorly known. We investigate the potential role that zooplankton play in the biological carbon pump using both in situ observations and model output. Observed and modelled estimates of fast, slow, and total sinking fluxes are presented from three oceanic sites: the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, the temperate North Atlantic, and the equatorial Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ)."

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Emma L. Cavan et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-14-177-2017

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