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Geochemical evidence from the Kioto Carbonate Platform (Tibet) reveals enhanced terrigenous input and deoxygenation during the early Toarcian

Abstract.

"The early Toarcian, as registered in a variety of sedimentary archives, was characterized by an abrupt negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) typically superimposed on a long-term positive trend, and was accompanied by significant climatic and environmental changes. However, the changes in continental weathering influx and oceanic deoxygenation in shallow waters and their possible role in causing carbonate-platform crises in low latitudes remains poorly constrained. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Zhong Han et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103887

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Enhanced phosphorus recycling during past oceanic anoxia amplified by low rates of apatite authigenesis

Abstract.

"Enhanced recycling of phosphorus as ocean deoxygenation expanded under past greenhouse climates contributed to widespread organic carbon burial and drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Redox-dependent phosphorus recycling was more efficient in such ancient anoxic marine environments, compared to modern anoxic settings, for reasons that remain unclear. Here, we show that low rates of apatite authigenesis in organic-rich sediments can explain the amplified phosphorus recycling in ancient settings as reflected in highly elevated ratios of organic carbon to total phosphorus. [...]".

 

Source: Science Advances 
Authors: Nina M. Papadomanolaki et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abn2370

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Competing and accelerating effects of anthropogenic nutrient inputs on climate-driven changes in ocean carbon and oxygen cycles

Abstract. 

"Nutrient inputs from the atmosphere and rivers to the ocean are increased substantially by human activities. However, the effects of increased nutrient inputs are not included in the widely used CMIP5 Earth system models, which introduce bias into model simulations of ocean biogeochemistry. Here, using historical simulations by an Earth system model with perturbed atmospheric and riverine nutrient inputs, we show that the contribution of anthropogenic nutrient inputs to past global changes in ocean biogeochemistry is of similar magnitude to the effect of climate change. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Akitomo Yamamoto et al. 
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abl9207

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Reactive oxygen species in the world ocean and their impacts on marine ecosystems

Abstract. 

"Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are omnipresent in the ocean, originating from both biological (e.g., unbalanced metabolism or stress) and non-biological processes (e.g. photooxidation of colored dissolved organic matter). ROS can directly affect the growth of marine organisms, and can also influence marine biogeochemistry, thus indirectly impacting the availability of nutrients and food sources. Microbial communities and evolution are shaped by marine ROS, and in turn microorganisms influence steady-state ROS concentrations by acting as the predominant sink for marine ROS. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: J. Jeffrey Morris et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2022.102285

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Anaerobic methane oxidation in a coastal oxygen minimum zone: spatial and temporal dynamics

Abstract. 

"Coastal waters are a major source of marine methane to the atmosphere. Particularly high concentrations of this potent greenhouse gas are found in anoxic waters, but it remains unclear if and to what extent anaerobic methanotrophs mitigate the methane flux. Here we investigate the long-term dynamics in methanotrophic activity and the methanotroph community in the coastal oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, combining biogeochemical analyses, experimental incubations and 16S rRNA gene sequencing over 3 consecutive years. [...]".

 

Source: Environmental Microbiology

Authors: Herdís G. R. Steinsdóttir et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.16003

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Sensitivity of Global Ocean Deoxygenation to Vertical and Isopycnal Mixing in an Ocean Biogeochemistry Model

Abstract. 

"Large-scale loss of oxygen under global warming is termed “ocean deoxygenation” and is caused by the imbalance between physical supply and biological consumption of oxygen in the ocean interior. Significant progress has been made in the theoretical understanding of ocean deoxygenation; however, many questions remain unresolved. The oxygen change in the tropical thermocline is poorly understood, with diverging projections among different models. Physical oxygen supply is controlled by a suite of processes that transport oxygen-rich surface waters into the interior ocean, which is expected to weaken due to increasing stratification under global warming. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library

Authors: Taka Ito et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GB007151

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Calculating dissolved marine oxygen values based on an enhanced Benthic Foraminifera Oxygen Index

Abstract. 

"Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) trap greenhouse gases, reduce livable habitats, a critical factor for these changes is the amount of dissolved oxygen (DO). The frequently used tool to reconstruct DO values, the Benthic Foraminifera Oxygen Index (BFOI), showed major shortcomings and lacks effectiveness. Therefore, we enhanced the BFOI and introduce enhanced BFOI (EBFOI) formulas by using all available data benthic foraminifers provide, calculating the whole livable habitat of benthic foraminifers, including bottom water oxygenation (BWO) and pore water oxygenation (PWO). Further, we introduce for the first time a transfer function to convert EBFOI vales directly into DO values, increasing efficiency by up to 38%. [...]".

 

Source: Nature Scientific Reports

Authors: Matthias Kranner et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-05295-8

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Small phytoplankton contribute greatly to CO2-fixation after the diatom bloom in the Southern Ocean

Abstract.

"Phytoplankton is composed of a broad-sized spectrum of phylogenetically diverse microorganisms. Assessing CO2-fixation intra- and inter-group variability is crucial in understanding how the carbon pump functions, as each group of phytoplankton may be characterized by diverse efficiencies in carbon fixation and export to the deep ocean. We measured the CO2-fixation of different groups of phytoplankton at the single-cell level around the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen plateau (Southern Ocean)[...]"

 

Source: The ISME Journal 
Authors: Solène Irion et al
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-021-00915-z

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Observing the Global Ocean with Biogeochemical-Argo

Abstract.

"Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) is a network of profiling floats carrying sensors that enable observation of as many as six essential biogeochemical and bio-optical variables: oxygen, nitrate, pH, chlorophyll a, suspended particles, and downwelling irradiance. This sensor network represents today's most promising strategy for collecting temporally and vertically resolved observations of biogeochemical properties throughout the ocean. All data are freely available within 24 hours of transmission. These data fill large gaps in ocean-observing systems and support three ambitions: gaining a better understanding of biogeochemical processes (e.g., the biological[...]"

 

Source: Annual Review of Marine Science
Authors: Hervé Claustre et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-010419-010956

Read the full article here.

 

 


Discovery and Mapping of the Triton Seep Site, Redondo Knoll: Fluid Flow and Microbial Colonization Within an Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"This paper examines a deep-water (∼900 m) cold-seep discovered in a low oxygen environment ∼30 km off the California coast in 2015 during an E/V Nautilus telepresence-enabled cruise. This Triton site was initially detected from bubble flares identified via shipboard multibeam sonar and was then confirmed visually using the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules. High resolution mapping (to 1 cm resolution) and co-registered imaging has provided us with a comprehensive site overview – both of the geologic setting and the extent of the associated microbial colonization. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Jamie K. S. Wagner et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00108

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