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Persistent spatial structuring of coastal ocean acidification in the California Current System

Abstract.

"The near-term progression of ocean acidification (OA) is projected to bring about sharp changes in the chemistry of coastal upwelling ecosystems. The distribution of OA exposure across these early-impact systems, however, is highly uncertain and limits our understanding of whether and how spatial management actions can be deployed to ameliorate future impacts. Through a novel coastal OA observing network, we have uncovered a remarkably persistent spatial mosaic in the penetration of acidified waters into ecologically-important nearshore habitats across 1,000 km of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem.  [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: F. Chan et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-02777-y

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The geologic history of seawater pH

Abstract.  

"Although pH is a fundamental property of Earth’s oceans, critical to our understanding of seawater biogeochemistry, its long-timescale geologic history is poorly constrained. We constrain seawater pH through time by accounting for the cycles of the major components of seawater. We infer an increase from early Archean pH values between ~6.5 and 7.0 and Phanerozoic values between ~7.5 and 9.0, which was caused by a gradual decrease in atmospheric pCO2 in response to solar brightening, alongside a decrease in hydrothermal exchange between seawater and the ocean crust. [...]"

Source: Science Vol. 355
Authors: I. Halevy, A. Bachan
DOI: 10.1126/science.aal4151

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A significant net sink for CO2 in Tokyo Bay

Abstract.

"Most estuaries and inland waters are significant source for atmospheric CO2 because of input of terrestrial inorganic carbon and mineralization of terrestrially supplied organic carbon. In contrast to most coastal waters, some estuaries with small freshwater discharge are weak source or sometimes sink for CO2. Extensive surveys of pCO2 in Tokyo Bay showed that the overall bay acts as a strong net sink for atmospheric CO2. Although small area was a consistent source for CO2, active photosynthesis driven by nutrient loading from the land overwhelmed the CO2 budget in the bay. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports Vol. 7
Authors: Atsushi Kubo, Yosaku Maeda & Jota Kanda
DOI: 10.1038/srep44355

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