News

Evaluating the promise and pitfalls of a potential climate change–tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California

Abstract.

"Marine fishery stakeholders are beginning to consider and implement adaptation strategies in the face of growing consumer demand and potential deleterious climate change impacts such as ocean warming, ocean acidification, and deoxygenation. This study investigates the potential for development of a novel climate change-tolerant sea urchin fishery in southern California based on Strongylocentrotus fragilis (pink sea urchin), a deep-sea species whose peak density was found to coincide with a current trap-based spot prawn fishery (Pandalus platyceros) in the 200–300-m depth range. [...]"

Source: ICES Journal of Marine Science
Authors: Kirk N Sato et al.
DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsx225

Read the full article here.


PICES 4th International Symposium: Extended deadline for abstract submission

The 4th International Symposium on The Effects of Climate Change on the Worlds Oceans has extended it's abstract submission deadline to January 12, 2018. You can find more information about abstract submission following this link

 


Patterns of deoxygenation: sensitivity to natural and anthropogenic drivers

Abstract.

"Observational estimates and numerical models both indicate a significant overall decline in marine oxygen levels over the past few decades. Spatial patterns of oxygen change, however, differ considerably between observed and modelled estimates. Particularly in the tropical thermocline that hosts open-ocean oxygen minimum zones, observations indicate a general oxygen decline, whereas most of the state-of-the-art models simulate increasing oxygen levels. Possible reasons for the apparent model-data discrepancies are examined. [...]"

Source: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Socie
Authors: Andreas Oschlies et al.
DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2016.0325

Read the full article here.


Bacterial Community Profiling of the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone Sediments using Cultivation Independent Approach

Abstract.

"The eastern Arabian Sea has a unique and permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) that extends along the western continental margin of India. In order to understand the bacterial community structure and diversity of OMZ sediment of the Arabian Sea (AS), PCR-DGGE analysis were carried out for samples collected off Ratnagiri, Goa and Karwar at 50m, 200m, 500m and 1000m depths. [...]"

Source: Examines Mar Biol Oceanogr
Authors: Baby Divya, Annie Feby and Shanta Nair

Read the full article here.


Biodiversity surprises at bubbly deep-sea cold seeps along Cascadia fault

"A new study led by Oregon State University (OSU) graduate student Sarah Seabrook that uses scientific data and samples from Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) focuses on the extent, variability, and complexity of species—from microbes to tubeworms—found at deep-sea cold seep habitats along the Cascadia fault off the west coast of North America.

The study reports for the first time on the surprisingly rich and diverse microbial and animal communities at eight recently discovered cold seeps, comparing these new sites off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and northern California with two known seeps off the coast of British Columbia at Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope—both monitored by ONC's cabled offshore observatory. [...]"

Source: Phys.org

Read the full article here.


The Northern Gulf of Mexico During OAE2 and the Relationship Between Water Depth and Black Shale Development

Abstract.

"Despite their name, Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) are not periods of uniform anoxia and black shale deposition in ancient oceans. Shelf environments account for the majority of productivity and organic carbon burial in the modern ocean, and this was likely true in the Cretaceous as well. However, it is unlikely that the mechanisms for such an increase were uniform across all shelf environments. Some, like the northwest margin of Africa, were characterized by strong upwelling, but what might drive enhanced productivity on shelves not geographically suited for upwelling? [...]"

Source: Plaeoceanography
Authors: Christopher M. Lowery
DOI: 10.1002/2017PA003180

Read the full article here.


On the effect of low oxygen concentrations on bacterial degradation of sinking particles

Abstract.

"In marine oxygen (O2) minimum zones (OMZs), the transfer of particulate organic carbon (POC) to depth via the biological carbon pump might be enhanced as a result of slower remineralisation under lower dissolved O2 concentrations (DO). In parallel, nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere through microbial processes, such as denitrification and anammox, is directly linked to particulate nitrogen (PN) export.  [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Frédéric A. C. Le Moigne
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-16903-3

Read the full article here.


Gulf of Mexico Battles Expanding Dead Zone in Louisiana

"During the summer of 2017, researchers with the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) and Louisiana State University mapped the largest dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico to date.

The Gulf of Mexico meets the shorelines of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and western Florida and is home to a large fishing industry. Several rivers from the Midwestern watershed flow south into the Gulf, carrying with them sediment, nutrient loads, and pollution from fossil fuel burning and wastewater systems.
The problem isn’t new, but it is expanding. "

Author: Mindy Cooper
Source: Environmental Monitor

Read the full article here.


Deep oceans may acidify faster than anticipated due to global warming

Abstract.

"Oceans worldwide are undergoing acidification due to the penetration of anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere. The rate of acidification generally diminishes with increasing depth. Yet, slowing down of the thermohaline circulation due to global warming could reduce the pH in the deep oceans, as more organic material would decompose with a longer residence time. [...]"

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Chen-Tung Arthur Chen
DOI: 10.1038/s41558-017-0003-y

Read the full article here.


Investigating the impacts of treated effluent discharge on coastal water health (Visakhapatnam, SW coast of Bay of Bengal, India)

Abstract.

"The present study investigated the impacts of treated effluent discharge on physicochemical and biological properties of coastal waters from three pharmaceuticals situated along the coast of Visakhapatnam (SW Bay of Bengal). Seawater samples were collected (during the months of December 2013, March 2014 and April 2014) from different sampling locations (Chippada (CHP), Tikkavanipalem (TKP) and Nakkapalli (NKP)) at 0- and 30-m depths within 2-km radius (0.5 km = inner, 1 km = middle and 2 km = outer sampling circles) from the marine outfall points. [...]"

Source: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Authors: Aziz Ur Rahman Shaik et al.
DOI: 10.1007/s10661-017-6344-1

Read the full article here.


Showing 1 - 10 of 202 results.
Items per Page 10
of 21