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Seasonal nearshore ocean acidification and deoxygenation in the Southern California Bight

Abstract. 

"The California Current System experiences seasonal ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH) owing to wind-driven upwelling, but little is known about the intensity, frequency, and depth distribution of OAH in the shallow nearshore environment. Here we present observations of OAH and dissolved inorganic carbon and nutrient parameters based on monthly transects from March 2017 to September 2018 extending from the surf zone to the ~ 40 m depth contour in La Jolla, California. Biologically concerning OAH conditions were observed at depths as shallow as 10 m and as close as 700 m to the shoreline. [...]".

 

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Samuel A. H. Kekuewa et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-21831-y

Read the full article here.


Physical-chemical factors influencing the vertical distribution of phototrophic pico-nanoplankton in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) off Northern Chile

Abstract. 

"The vertical distribution of phytoplankton is of fundamental importance in the structure, dynamic, and biogeochemical pathways in marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, what are the main factors determining this distribution remains as an open question. Here, we evaluated the relative influence of environmental factors that might control the coexistence and vertical distribution of pico-nanoplankton associated with the OMZ off northern Chile. Our results showed that in the upper layer Synechococcus-like cells were numerically important at all sampling stations. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edson Piscoya et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2022.105710

Read the full article here.


Environmental change and carbon-cycle dynamics during the onset of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional system

Abstract. 

"We report the first high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical record of the negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) at the onset of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional environment, analysed from a well core from c. 2500 m depth, 100 km offshore Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Time-series analysis of stable oxygen isotope values and concentrations of Si, Al, and Ti resulted in durations of the C3 and C4 segments of the CIE that support relative completeness of the C3 segment and high sediment preservation rates of c. 13 cm/kyr of the studied sedimentary sequence. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Thomas Steuber et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2022.111086

Read the full article here.


Ocean acidification alters the nutritional value of Antarctic diatoms

Abstract.

"Primary production in the Southern Ocean is dominated by diatom-rich phytoplankton assemblages, whose individual physiological characteristics and community composition are strongly shaped by the environment, yet knowledge on how diatoms allocate cellular energy in response to ocean acidification (OA) is limited. Understanding such changes in allocation is integral to determining the nutritional quality of diatoms and the subsequent impacts on the trophic transfer of energy and nutrients.[...]".

 

Source: New Phytologist 
Authors: Rebecca J. Duncan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.17868

Read the full article here.


Effect of environmental history on the habitat-forming kelp Macrocystis pyrifera responses to ocean acidification and warming: a physiological and mol

Abstract.

"The capacity of marine organisms to adapt and/or acclimate to climate change might differ among distinct populations, depending on their local environmental history and phenotypic plasticity. Kelp forests create some of the most productive habitats in the world, but globally, many populations have been negatively impacted by multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we compare the physiological and molecular responses to ocean acidification (OA) and warming (OW) of two populations of the giant kelp[...]"

 

Source: Nature Scientific Reports
Authors: Pamela A. Fernández et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82094-7

Read the full article here.


Impacts of hypoxic events surpass those of future ocean warming and acidification

Abstract.

"Over the past decades, three major challenges to marine life have emerged as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions: ocean warming, acidification and oxygen loss. While most experimental research has targeted the first two stressors, the last remains comparatively neglected. Here, we implemented sequential hierarchical mixed-model meta-analyses (721 control–treatment comparisons) to compare the impacts of oxygen conditions associated with the current and continuously intensifying hypoxic events (1–3.5 O2 mg l−1) with those experimentally yielded by ocean warming (+4 °C) and acidification (−0.4 units) conditions[...]"

 

Source: Nature Ecology & Evolution 
Authors: Eduardo Sampaio et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01370-3

Read the full article here.


Ocean acidification may slow the pace of tropicalization of temperate fish communities

Abstract.

"Poleward range extensions by warm-adapted sea urchins are switching temperate marine ecosystems from kelp-dominated to barren-dominated systems that favour the establishment of range-extending tropical fishes. Yet, such tropicalization may be buffered by ocean acidification, which reduces urchin grazing performance and the urchin barrens that tropical range-extending fishes prefer. Using ecosystems experiencing natural warming and acidification, we show that ocean acidification could buffer warming-facilitated[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Ericka O. C. Coni et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00980-w

Read the full article here.


Extreme Levels of Ocean Acidification Restructure the Plankton Community and Biogeochemistry of a Temperate Coastal Ecosystem: A Mesocosm Study

Abstract.

"The oceans’ uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) decreases seawater pH and alters the inorganic carbon speciation – summarized in the term ocean acidification (OA). Already today, coastal regions experience episodic pH events during which surface layer pH drops below values projected for the surface ocean at the end of the century. Future OA is expected to further enhance the intensity of these coastal extreme pH events. To evaluate the influence of such episodic OA events in coastal regions, we deployed eight pelagic mesocosms[...]".

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Carsten Spisla et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.611157

Read the full article here.


Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a species-poor early successional stage

Abracts.

"Long-term exposure to CO2-enriched waters can considerably alter marine biological community development, often resulting in simplified systems dominated by turf algae that possess reduced biodiversity and low ecological complexity. Current understanding of the underlying processes by which ocean acidification alters biological community development and stability remains limited, making the management of such shifts problematic. Here, we deployed recruitment tiles in reference[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Ben P. Harvey et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15455

Read the full article here.


Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a species-poor early successional stage

Abstract.

"Long-term exposure to CO2-enriched waters can considerably alter marine biological community development, often resulting in simplified systems dominated by turf algae that possess reduced biodiversity and low ecological complexity. Current understanding of the underlying processes by which ocean acidification alters biological community development and stability remains limited, making the management of such shifts problematic. Here, we deployed recruitment[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Ben P. Harvey et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15455

Read the full article here.


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