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Ironstone as a proxy of Paleozoic ocean oxygenation

Abstract. 

"Marine ironstone is a Phanerozoic biochemical sedimentary rock that contains abundant primary iron. Although rare, ironstone is conspicuous in the Paleozoic sedimentary record. Its iron source remains contentious, with traditional models invoking a continentally derived source. Increasing sedimentologic evidence suggests that many Paleozoic ironstones formed along favourably oriented continental margins where coastal upwelling delivered ferruginous waters, with the postulated source of iron being deep-ocean hydrothermal fluids. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edward J. Matheson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117715

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LIP volcanism (not anoxia) tracked by Cr isotopes during Ocean Anoxic Event 2 in the proto-North Atlantic region

Abstract.

"Chromium is a redox sensitive element that exhibits a large range of isotopic compositions in Earth’s surface environments because of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) transformations. This property of Cr has been exploited as a tracer of Earth’s oxygenation history using marine sediments. However, paleoredox applications using Cr are difficult to implement due to its complicated cycling, which creates spatial variability in seawater δ53Cr values. Applications are further hindered by the potential for variability in the major inputs of Cr, such as submarine volcanism, to mask redox processes. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Lucien Nana Yobo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.06.016

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Isotopic evidence for changes in the mercury and zinc cycles during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 in the northwestern Tethys, Austria

Abstract. 

"The Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2, ca. 94 Ma) was one of the most extreme carbon cycle and climatic perturbations of the Phanerozoic Eon. Widespread deposition of organic-rich shales during OAE 2 has been attributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric CO2, global heating, and marine anoxia triggered by intense large igneous province (LIP) volcanism. Here, we present new Hg and Zn elemental and isotopic analyses from samples spanning OAE 2 in a hemipelagic section from Rehkogelgraben, Austria, which was part of the north-western Tethys. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Hanwei Yao et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103881

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Uranium isotope reconstruction of ocean deoxygenation during OAE 2 hampered by uncertainties in fractionation factors and local U-cycling

Abstract. 

"A δ238U record of changing ocean anoxia during OAE 2 is reconstructed using seawater derived U in pelagic marine sediments in the Portland #1 core in the south-central region of the Western Interior Seaway of North America. The peak negative excursion of 1.4‰ in authigenic sedimentary δ238U values is consistent with expansion of marine anoxia during the event, but the size of the shift is much larger than the negative excursions recorded in two other published records. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Brayden S. McDonald et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.05.010

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Enhanced phosphorus recycling during past oceanic anoxia amplified by low rates of apatite authigenesis

Abstract.

"Enhanced recycling of phosphorus as ocean deoxygenation expanded under past greenhouse climates contributed to widespread organic carbon burial and drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Redox-dependent phosphorus recycling was more efficient in such ancient anoxic marine environments, compared to modern anoxic settings, for reasons that remain unclear. Here, we show that low rates of apatite authigenesis in organic-rich sediments can explain the amplified phosphorus recycling in ancient settings as reflected in highly elevated ratios of organic carbon to total phosphorus. [...]".

 

Source: Science Advances 
Authors: Nina M. Papadomanolaki et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abn2370

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Oceanic anoxia and extinction in the latest Ordovician

Abstract.

"The Late Ordovician (Hirnantian) mass extinction (LOME) was marked by two discrete pulses of high species turnover rates attributed to glacial cooling (LOME-1) and subsequent expansion of anoxic marine conditions (LOME-2). However, the mechanisms and extent of global marine anoxia remain controversial. In this study, we present uranium isotope (U) data from a new Ordovician-Silurian (O-S) boundary carbonate section in the Southwest China to explore the extent/duration of the global marine anoxia, and links to the LOME. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Mu Liu et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117553

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Marine anoxia linked to abrupt global warming during Earth’s penultimate icehouse

Abstract.

"Piecing together the history of carbon (C) perturbation events throughout Earth’s history has provided key insights into how the Earth system responds to abrupt warming. Previous studies, however, focused on short-term warming events that were superimposed on longer-term greenhouse climate states. Here, we present an integrated proxy (C and uranium [U] isotopes and paleo CO2) and multicomponent modeling approach to investigate an abrupt C perturbation and global warming event (∼304 Ma) that occurred during a paleo-glacial state. We report pronounced negative C and U isotopic excursions coincident with a doubling of atmospheric CO2 partial pressure and a biodiversity nadir. [...]".

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Authors: Jitao Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2115231119

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Marine anoxia as a trigger for the largest Phanerozoic positive carbon isotope excursion: Evidence from carbonate barium isotope record

Abstract. 

"The mid-Ludfordian Lau carbon isotope excursion (Lau CIE) represents the largest positive carbon isotope excursion in the Phanerozoic (~9‰), coincident with the biodiversity loss of many marine animal clades. Two main explanations for the Lau CIE are enhanced organic carbon burial via increased marine productivity and preservation-driven expansion of anoxia. While these two explanations are not mutually exclusive, the main driver of Lau CIE is yet to be constrained. Here, we resolve this longstanding debate using barium isotopes (δ138 Ba) of marine carbonates deposited across the Lau CIE. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Feifei Zhang et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117421

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Uranium isotope evidence for extensive shallow water anoxia in the early Tonian oceans

Abstract. 

"The Earth's redox evolution has been commonly assumed to have played a key role in shaping the evolutionary history of the biosphere. However, whether and how shifts in marine redox conditions are linked to key biotic events – foremost the rise of animals and the ecological expansion of eukaryotic algae in the late Proterozoic oceans – remains heavily debated. Our current picture of global marine redox evolution during this critical interval is incomplete. This is particularly the case for the Tonian Period (∼1.0 to ∼0.717 Ga), when animals may have diverged and when eukaryotic algae began their rise in ecological importance. Here, we present new uranium isotope (U) measurements from Tonian carbonates to fill this outstanding gap. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 

Authors: Feifei Zhang et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117437

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Extensive marine anoxia in the European epicontinental sea during the end-Triassic mass extinction

Abstract. 

"Warming-induced marine anoxia has been hypothesized as an environmental stressor for the end-Triassic mass extinction (ETME), but links between the spread of marine anoxia and the two phases of extinction are poorly constrained. Here, we report iron speciation and trace metal data from the Bristol Channel Basin and Larne Basin of the NW European epicontinental sea (EES), spanning the Triassic–Jurassic (T–J) transition (~ 202–200 Ma). Results show frequent development of anoxic-ferruginous conditions, interspersed with ephemeral euxinic episodes in the Bristol Channel Basin during the latest Rhaetian, whereas the contemporaneous Larne Basin remained largely oxygenated, suggesting heterogeneous redox conditions between basins. Subsequently, more persistent euxinic conditions prevailed across the T–J boundary in both basins, coinciding precisely with the second phase of the ETME. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Tianchen He et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103771

Read the full article here.


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