News

Biogeochemistry and hydrography shape microbial community assembly and activity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycles due to extensive microbial activity. How OMZ microbial communities assemble and respond to environmental variation is therefore essential to understanding OMZ functioning and ocean biogeochemistry. Sampling along depth profiles at five stations in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP), we captured systematic variations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and associated variables (nitrite, chlorophyll, and ammonium) with depth and between stations. We quantitatively analysed relationships[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library 
Authors: J. Michael Beman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15215

Read the full article here.


Southern Ocean carbon export efficiency in relation to temperature and primary productivity

Abstract.

"Satellite remote sensing and numerical models are widely used to estimate large-scale variations in ocean carbon export, but the relationship between export efficiency (e-ratio) of sinking organic carbon out of the surface ocean and its drivers remains poorly understood, especially in the Southern Ocean. Here, we assess the effects of temperature and primary productivity on e-ratio by combining particulate organic carbon export flux from in situ measurements during 1997–2013, environmental parameters from satellite products, and outputs from ocean biogeochemical models in the Southern Ocean. Results show that “High Productivity Low E-ratio” (HPLE) is a common phenomenon in the Subantarctic Zone and the Polar Frontal Zone, but not the Antarctic Zone[...]"

 

Source: Nature Scientific Reports
Authors: Gaojing Fan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-70417-z 

Read the full article here.


Heat and carbon coupling reveals ocean warming due to circulation changes

Abstract.

Anthropogenic global surface warming is proportional to cumulative carbon emissions1,2,3; this relationship is partly determined by the uptake and storage of heat and carbon by the ocean4. The rates and patterns of ocean heat and carbon storage are influenced by ocean transport, such as mixing and large-scale circulation5,6,7,8,9,10. However, existing climate models do not accurately capture the observed patterns of ocean warming, with a large spread in their projections of ocean circulation and ocean heat uptake8,11. Additionally, assessing the influence of ocean circulation changes (specifically, the redistribution of heat by resolved advection) on patterns[...]"

Source: Nature
Authors: Ben Bronselaer et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2573-5

Read the full article here.


Physical Mechanisms Driving Oxygen Subduction in the Global

Abstract.

"Future changes in subduction are suspected to be critical for the ocean deoxygenation predicted by climate models over the 21st century. However, the drivers of global oxygen subduction have not been fully described or quantified. Here, we address the physical mechanisms responsible for the oxygen transport across the late‐winter mixed layer base and their relation with water mass formation. Up to 70% of the global oxygen uptake takes place during Mode Water subduction mostly in the Southern Ocean[...]"

 

Source: Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: Esther Portela et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GL089040

Read the full article here.

 

 


Recovery from multi-millennial natural costal hypoxia in the Stockholm Archipelago, Baltic Sea, terminated by modern human activity

Abstract.

"Enhanced nutrient input and warming have led to the development of low oxygen (hypoxia) in coastal waters globally. For many coastal areas, insight into redox conditions prior to human impact is lacking. Here, we reconstructed bottom water redox conditions and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the coastal Stockholm Archipelago over the past 3000 yr. Elevated sedimentary concentrations of molybdenum indicate (seasonal) hypoxia between 1000 b.c.e. and 1500 c.e. Biomarker[...]"

 

Source: Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography
Authors: Niels A. G. M. van Helmond et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11575

Read the full article here.

 


Biogeochemistry and hydrography shape microbial community assembly and activity in the eastern topical North Pacific Ocean oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycles due to extensive microbial activity. How OMZ microbial communities assemble and respond to environmental variation is therefore essential to understanding OMZ functioning and ocean biogeochemistry. Sampling along depth profiles at five stations in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP), we captured systematic variations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and associated variables (nitrite, chlorophyll, and ammonium) with depth and between stations. We quantitatively analysed relationships between oceanographic gradients and microbial community assembly and activity based on paired 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. Overall microbial community[...] "

 

Source: Society for Applied Microbiology
Authors: J. Michael Berman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15215

Read the full article here.


Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability

Abstract.

"Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from the Redfield ratio, the molar ratio of oxygen to organic carbon consumed during respiration (i.e., the respiration quotient, r −O2:C  r−O2:C ) is consistently assumed constant but rarely, if ever, measured. Using a prognostic[...]"

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Allison R. Moreno et al.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004986117

Read the full article here.


Contrasting Upper and Deep Ocean Oxygen Response to Protracted Global Warming

Abstract.

"It is well established that the ocean is currently losing dissolved oxygen (O2) in response to ocean warming, but the long‐term, equilibrium response of O2 to a warmer climate is neither well quantified nor understood. Here we use idealized multimillennial global warming simulations with a comprehensive Earth system model to show that the equilibrium response in ocean O2 differs fundamentally from the ongoing transient response. After physical equilibration of the model (>4,000 years) under a two times preindustrial CO2 scenario, the deep ocean[...]"

Source: Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: T. L. Frölicher et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GB006601

Read the full article here.


Mangrove-Derived Organic and Inorganic Carbon Exchanges Between the Sinnamary Estuarine System

Abstract.

"There is growing evidence that a substantial fraction of the dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can be exported from mangroves to the ocean. Yet our understanding of C fluxes in mangrove forests is limited to only few regional studies that exclude the world's longest sediment dispersal system connected to the Amazon River. The present study aims at (1) examining tidal fluctuations of DOC, POC, and DIC; their isotopes; and optical properties such as chromophoric dissolved organic matter[...]"


Source: Advancing Earth And Space Science
Authors: Raghab Ray et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JG005739

Read the full article here.

 

 

 


Ocean acidification reduces growth and grazing impact of Antarctic heterotrophic nanoflagellates

Abstract.

"High-latitude oceans have been identified as particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification if anthropogenic CO2 emissions continue. Marine microbes are an essential part of the marine food web and are a critical link in biogeochemical processes in the ocean, such as the cycling of nutrients and carbon. Despite this, the response of Antarctic marine microbial communities to ocean acidification is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of increasing fCO2 on the growth of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs), nano- and picophytoplankton, and prokaryotes (heterotrophic Bacteria and Archaea) in a natural coastal Antarctic marine microbial community from Prydz Bay, East Antarctica.[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Stacy Deppeler et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-17-4153-2020

Read the  full article here.

 

 


Showing 1 - 10 of 13 results.
Items per Page 10
of 2