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Seasonal nearshore ocean acidification and deoxygenation in the Southern California Bight

Abstract. 

"The California Current System experiences seasonal ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH) owing to wind-driven upwelling, but little is known about the intensity, frequency, and depth distribution of OAH in the shallow nearshore environment. Here we present observations of OAH and dissolved inorganic carbon and nutrient parameters based on monthly transects from March 2017 to September 2018 extending from the surf zone to the ~ 40 m depth contour in La Jolla, California. Biologically concerning OAH conditions were observed at depths as shallow as 10 m and as close as 700 m to the shoreline. [...]".

 

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Samuel A. H. Kekuewa et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-21831-y

Read the full article here.


Deglacial restructuring of the Eastern equatorial Pacific oxygen minimum zone

Abstract. 

"Oxygenation in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific is responsive to ongoing climate change in the modern ocean, although whether the region saw a deglacial change in extent or position of the Oxygen Minimum Zone remains poorly constrained. Here, stable isotopes from the shells of an Oxygen Minimum Zone-dwelling planktic foraminifer are used to reassess the position of the mid-water Oxygen Minimum Zone relative to both the thermocline and benthos. Oxygen isotopes record a rapid shoaling of the Oxygen Minimum Zone towards the thermocline associated with Heinrich Stadial 1 and persisting through the deglaciation. [...]". 

 

Source: Communications Earth & Environment
Authors: Catherine V. Davis
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00477-8

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Mid-Cretaceous marine Os isotope evidence for heterogeneous cause of oceanic anoxic events

Abstract. 

"During the mid-Cretaceous, the Earth experienced several environmental perturbations, including an extremely warm climate and Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). Submarine volcanic episodes associated with formation of large igneous provinces (LIPs) may have triggered these perturbations. The osmium isotopic ratio (187Os/188Os) is a suitable proxy for tracing hydrothermal activity associated with the LIPs formation, but 187Os/188Os data from the mid-Cretaceous are limited to short time intervals. Here we provide a continuous high-resolution marine 187Os/188Os record covering all mid-Cretaceous OAEs. Several OAEs (OAE1a, Wezel and Fallot events, and OAE2) correspond to unradiogenic 187Os/188Os shifts, suggesting that they were triggered by massive submarine volcanic episodes. However, minor OAEs (OAE1c and OAE1d), which do not show pronounced unradiogenic 187Os/188Os shifts, were likely caused by enhanced monsoonal activity. [...]".

 

Source: Nature Communications 

Authors: Hironao Matsumoto et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-27817-0

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GO-SHIP Easy Ocean: Gridded ship-based hydrographic section of temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen

Abstract.

"Despite technological advances over the last several decades, ship-based hydrography remains the only method for obtaining high-quality, high spatial and vertical resolution measurements of physical, chemical, and biological parameters over the full water column essential for physical, chemical, and biological oceanography and climate science. The Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP) coordinates a network of globally sustained hydrographic sections. These data provide a unique data set that spans four decades, comprised of more than 40 cross-ocean transects. The section data are, however, difficult to use owing to inhomogeneous format. The purpose of this new temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen data product is to combine, reformat and grid these data measured by Conductivity-Temperature-Depth-Oxygen (CTDO) profilers in order to facilitate their use by a wider audience. [...]".

 

Source: Nature Scientific Data

Authors: Katsuro Katsumata et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-022-01212-w

Read the full article here.


A committed fourfold increase in ocean oxygen loss

Abstract.

"Less than a quarter of ocean deoxygenation that will ultimately be caused by historical CO2 emissions is already realized, according to millennial-scale model simulations that assume zero CO2 emissions from year 2021 onwards. About 80% of the committed oxygen loss occurs below 2000 m depth, where a more sluggish overturning circulation will increase water residence times and accumulation of respiratory oxygen demand. According to the model results, the deep ocean will thereby lose more than 10% of its pre-industrial oxygen content even if CO2 emissions and thus global warming[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Andreas Oschlies 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22584-4

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Pervasive distribution of polyester fibres in the Arctic Ocean is driven by Atlantic inputs

Abstract.

"Microplastics are increasingly recognized as ubiquitous global contaminants, but questions linger regarding their source, transport and fate. We document the widespread distribution of microplastics in near-surface seawater from 71 stations across the European and North American Arctic - including the North Pole. We also characterize samples to a depth of 1,015 m in the Beaufort Sea. Particle abundance correlated with longitude, with almost three times more particles in the eastern Arctic compared to the west. Polyester comprised[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Peter S. Ross et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20347-1

Read the full article here.


Status and trends of Arctic Ocean environmental change and its impacts on marine biogeochemistry: Findings from the ArCS project

Abstract.

"Ocean observation research theme under ArCS project, “Theme 4: Observational research on Arctic Ocean environmental changes”, aimed to elucidate the status and trends of ongoing Arctic Ocean environmental changes and to evaluate their impacts on Arctic marine ecosystem and the global climate system. For these purposes, we conducted field observations, mooring observations, laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and international collaborative research focusing on the Pacific Arctic[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Takashi Kikuchi et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polar.2021.100639

Read the full article here.


Glacial deep ocean deoxygenation driven by biologically mediated air–sea disequilibrium

Abstract.

"Deep ocean deoxygenation inferred from proxies has been used to support the hypothesis that a lower atmospheric carbon dioxide during glacial times was due to an increase in the strength of the ocean’s biological pump. This relies on the assumption that surface ocean oxygen (O2) is equilibrated with the atmosphere such that any O2 deficiency observed in deep waters is a result of organic matter respiration, which consumes O2 and produces dissolved inorganic carbon. However, this assumption has been shown to be imperfect because of disequilibrium. Here we used an Earth system[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience 
Authors: Ellen Cliff et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-00667-z

Read the full article here.


Phosphorus-limited conditions in the early Neoproterozoic ocean maintained low levels of atmospheric oxygen

Abstract.

"The redox chemistry of anoxic continental margin settings evolved from widespread sulfide-containing (euxinic) conditions to a global ferruginous (iron-containing) state in the early Neoproterozoic era (from ~1 to 0.8 billion years ago). Ocean redox chemistry exerts a strong control on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, a limiting nutrient, and hence on primary production, but the response of the phosphorus cycle to this major ocean redox transition has not been investigated. Here, we use a geochemical[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Romain Guilbaud et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-0548-7

Read the full article here.

 


Subseafloor life and its biogeochemical impacts

Abstract.

"Subseafloor microbial activities are central to Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. They control Earth’s surface oxidation and major aspects of ocean chemistry. They affect climate on long timescales and play major roles in forming and destroying economic resources. In this review, we evaluate present understanding of subseafloor microbes and their activities, identify research gaps, and recommend approaches to filling those gaps. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Steven D’Hondt et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-11450-z

Read the full article here.


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