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Intensive ocean anoxia and large δ13Ccarb perturbations during the Carnian Humid Episode (Late Triassic) in Southwest China

Abstract. 

"The Carnian Humid Episode (CHE) represents a dramatic dry to wet climate transition in the Late Triassic. Manifestations of this climate shift and its associated biological and environmental responses are not fully understood. Here, we carried out carbonate carbon isotope, trace metal, and pyrite framboid analyses at Wolonggang in southwest China to trace palaeoenvironmental changes during this critical interval. The CHE at Wolonggang is marked by the development of fine laminated carbonaceous siltstones and black shales overlying the intensely bioturbated Zhuganpo limestone deposited in the latest Julian 1. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Zaitian Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103942

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Iron deposition during recovery from Late Devonian oceanic anoxia: Implications of the geochemistry of the Kawame ferromanganese deposit, Nedamo Belt

Abstract. 

"The Late Devonian, during which one of the “Big Five” Phanerozoic mass extinction events occurred, was one of the most important time intervals in Earth history. Nevertheless, the paucity of deep-sea records due to subduction has hampered elucidation of the pelagic environment during the Late Devonian in Panthalassa. However, ancient hydrothermal ferromanganese sediments, which were deposited on the abyssal seafloor and then accreted onto continental margins, are preserved as umber deposits and exposed in accretionary prisms. These sediments can provide key information to characterize the paleo-ocean. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Yusuke Kuwahara et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103920

Read the full article here.


Plate tectonics controls ocean oxygen levels

Abstract. 

"Variations in ocean oxygen levels during Earth’s history have been linked to evolution and mass extinctions. Simulations now suggest that the configuration of the continents has a substantial impact on ocean oxygenation. [...]". 

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Katrin J. Meissner & Andreas Oschlies
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-022-02187-9

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Constraining marine anoxia under the extremely oxygenated Permian atmosphere using uranium isotopes in calcitic brachiopods and marine carbonates

Abstract. 

"The redox chemistry change in ancient oceans has profoundly shaped the evolutionary trajectories of animals. Uranium isotopes (U) in marine carbonate sediments have widely been used to place quantitative constraints on the oxygenation state of the oceans through geological history. However, syndepositional and post-depositional diagenesis impose a positive and variable U offset in the carbonate sediments relative to contemporaneous seawater, leaving uncertainties on quantification of anoxic seafloor areas in the past. Studies from modern settings suggest that Low-Magnesium Calcite (LMC) in articulate brachiopod shells are diagenetic resistant materials that may faithfully record the U value of ancient seawater. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Wen-qian Wang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117714

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Environmental change and carbon-cycle dynamics during the onset of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional system

Abstract. 

"We report the first high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical record of the negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) at the onset of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a from a carbonate-ramp depositional environment, analysed from a well core from c. 2500 m depth, 100 km offshore Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Time-series analysis of stable oxygen isotope values and concentrations of Si, Al, and Ti resulted in durations of the C3 and C4 segments of the CIE that support relative completeness of the C3 segment and high sediment preservation rates of c. 13 cm/kyr of the studied sedimentary sequence. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Thomas Steuber et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2022.111086

Read the full article here.


A Depth-Transect of Ocean Deoxygenation During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: Magnetofossils in Sediment Cores From the Southeast Atlantic

Abstract. 

"The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ∼56 Ma) presents a past analog for future global warming. Previous studies provided evidence for major loss of dissolved oxygen during the PETM, although understanding the degree and distribution of oxygen loss poses challenges. Magnetofossils produced by magnetotactic bacteria are sensitive to redox conditions in sediments and water columns, and have been used to reconstruct paleoredox conditions over a range of geological settings. [...]".

 

Source: JGR Solid Earth
Authors: Pengfei Xue et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022JB024714

Read the full article here.


Ventilation changes drive orbital-scale deoxygenation trends in the late Cretaceous ocean

Abstract. 

"Mechanisms that drive cyclicity in marine sediment deposits during hothouse climate periods in response to Earth’s orbit variations remain debated. Orbital cycles fingerprint in the oceanographic records results from the combined effect of terrestrial (e.g. weathering-derived nutrient supply, freshwater discharge) and oceanic (e.g. productivity, oxygenation) processes, whose respective contribution remains to be clarified. [...]".

 

Source: Geophysical Research Letters
Authors: Anta-Clarisse Sarr et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022GL099830

Read the full article here.


Ironstone as a proxy of Paleozoic ocean oxygenation

Abstract. 

"Marine ironstone is a Phanerozoic biochemical sedimentary rock that contains abundant primary iron. Although rare, ironstone is conspicuous in the Paleozoic sedimentary record. Its iron source remains contentious, with traditional models invoking a continentally derived source. Increasing sedimentologic evidence suggests that many Paleozoic ironstones formed along favourably oriented continental margins where coastal upwelling delivered ferruginous waters, with the postulated source of iron being deep-ocean hydrothermal fluids. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edward J. Matheson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117715

Read the full article here.


LIP volcanism (not anoxia) tracked by Cr isotopes during Ocean Anoxic Event 2 in the proto-North Atlantic region

Abstract.

"Chromium is a redox sensitive element that exhibits a large range of isotopic compositions in Earth’s surface environments because of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) transformations. This property of Cr has been exploited as a tracer of Earth’s oxygenation history using marine sediments. However, paleoredox applications using Cr are difficult to implement due to its complicated cycling, which creates spatial variability in seawater δ53Cr values. Applications are further hindered by the potential for variability in the major inputs of Cr, such as submarine volcanism, to mask redox processes. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Lucien Nana Yobo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.06.016

Read the full article here.


Continental configuration controls ocean oxygenation during the Phanerozoic

Abstract. 

"The early evolutionary and much of the extinction history of marine animals is thought to be driven by changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations ([O2]) in the ocean. In turn, [O2] is widely assumed to be dominated by the geological history of atmospheric oxygen (pO2). Here, by contrast, we show by means of a series of Earth system model experiments how continental rearrangement during the Phanerozoic Eon drives profound variations in ocean oxygenation and induces a fundamental decoupling in time between upper-ocean and benthic [O2]. [...]". 

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Alexandre Pohl et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-022-05018-z 

Read the full article here.


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