News

Preprint: ISASO2 : Recent trends and regional patterns of Ocean Dissolved Oxygen change

Abstract.

"Recent estimates of the global inventory of dissolved oxygen (DO) have suggested a decrease of 2 % since the 1960s. However, due to the sparse historical oxygen data coverage, the DO inventory exhibits large regional uncertainties at interannual timescale. Using ISASO2, a new DO Argo-based optimally interpolated climatology https://doi.org/10.17882/52367 (Kolodziejczyk et al.,2021), we have estimated an updated regional oxygen inventory. Over the long term (~1980–2013), comparing the ISASO2 Argo fields with the first guess WOA18 built from the DO bottle samples fields extracted from WOD18, the broad tendency to global ocean deoxygenation remains robust in the upper 2000 m with -451±243 Tmol per decade. [...]".

 

Source: Earth System Science Data
Authors: Nicolas Kolodziejczyk et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2024-106

Read the full article here.


The Ocean's Meridional Oxygen Transport

Abstract.

"Quantification of oxygen uptake at the ocean surface and its surface-to-interior pathways is crucial for understanding oxygen concentration change in a warming ocean. We investigate the mean meridional global oxygen transport between 1950 and 2009 using coupled physical-biogeochemical model output. We introduce a streamfunction in latitude-oxygen coordinates to reduce complexity in the description of the mean meridional oxygen pathways. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Esther Portela et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023JC020259

Read the full article here.


Chapter 13 - The crucial contribution of mixing to present and future ocean oxygen distribution

Abstract.

"The oxygen content of the ocean interior largely results from a balance between respiration and advective ventilation, with only a small contribution from mixing processes. However, two important characteristics, which are key to future oxygen distribution in the ocean, primarily depend on the strength of ocean mixing. The first relates to the oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), which are wide O2-deficient mesopelagic layers inhospitable to most marine macro-fauna. We illustrate how mixing intensity controls the volume[...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Marina Lévy et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-821512-8.00020-7

Read the full article here.


Rapid ecosystem-scale consequences of acute deoxygenation on a Caribbean coral reef

Abstract.

"Loss of oxygen in the global ocean is accelerating due to climate change and eutrophication, but how acute deoxygenation events affect tropical marine ecosystems remains poorly understood. Here we integrate analyses of coral reef benthic communities with microbial community sequencing to show how a deoxygenation event rapidly altered benthic community composition and microbial assemblages in a shallow tropical reef ecosystem. Conditions associated with the event precipitated coral bleaching and mass mortality, causing a 50% loss of live coral and a shift in the benthic community that persisted a year later. Conversely, the unique taxonomic and functional profile of hypoxia-associated microbes rapidly reverted to a normoxic assemblage[...]".

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Maggie D. Johnson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24777-3

Read the full article here.


Fate of floating plastic debris released along the coasts in a global ocean model

Abstract.

"Marine plastic pollution is a global issue, from the shores to the open ocean. Understanding the pathway and fate of plastic debris is fundamental to manage and reduce plastic pollution. Here, the fate of floating plastic pollution discharged along the coasts is studied by comparing two sources, one based on river discharges and the other on mismanaged waste from coastal populations, using a Lagrangian numerical analysis in a global ocean circulation model. About 1/3 of the particles end up in the open ocean and 2/3 on beaches[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Fanny Chenillat et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.112116

Read the full article here.


A committed fourfold increase in ocean oxygen loss

Abstract.

"Less than a quarter of ocean deoxygenation that will ultimately be caused by historical CO2 emissions is already realized, according to millennial-scale model simulations that assume zero CO2 emissions from year 2021 onwards. About 80% of the committed oxygen loss occurs below 2000 m depth, where a more sluggish overturning circulation will increase water residence times and accumulation of respiratory oxygen demand. According to the model results, the deep ocean will thereby lose more than 10% of its pre-industrial oxygen content even if CO2 emissions and thus global warming[...]".

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Andreas Oschlies
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22584-4 

Read the full article here.


In oceanography, acoustics and hydrodynamics: An extended coupled (2+1)-dimensional Burgers system

Abstract.

"In oceanography, acoustics and hydrodynamics, people pay attention to the Burgers-type equations for different wave processes, one of which is an extended coupled (2+1)-dimensional Burgers system hereby under investigation. Based on the scaling transformation, Bell polynomials, Hirota operators and symbolic computation, we structure out two hetero-Bäcklund transformations, each of which to a solvable linear partial differential[...]"

 

Source: Science Direkt
Authors: Xin-YiGao et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cjph.2020.11.017

Read the full article here.


Paleocene-Eocene volcanic segmentation of the Norwegian-Greenland seaway reorganized high-latitude ocean circulation

Abstract.

"The paleoenvironmental and paleogeographic development of the Norwegian–Greenland seaway remains poorly understood, despite its importance for the oceanographic and climatic conditions of the Paleocene–Eocene greenhouse world. Here we present analyses of the sedimentological and paleontological characteristics of Paleocene–Eocene deposits (between 63 and 47 million years old) in northeast Greenland, and investigate key unconformities and volcanic facies observed through seismic reflection imaging in offshore basins.[...]"

 

Source: Communications Earth & Environment
Authors: Jussi Hovikoski et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-021-00249-w

Read the full article here.


Ocean currents as a potential dispersal pathway for Antarctica’s most persistent non-native terrestrial insect

Abstract.

"The non-native midge Eretmoptera murphyi is Antarctica’s most persistent non-native insect and is known to impact the terrestrial ecosystems. It inhabits by considerably increasing litter turnover and availability of soil nutrients. The midge was introduced to Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, from its native South Georgia, and routes of dispersal to date have been aided by human activities, with little known about non-human-assisted methods of dispersal. This study is the first to determine the potential for dispersal of a terrestrial invertebrate species in Antarctica by combining physiological sea water tolerance data with quantitative assessments[...]"

 

Source: Polar Biology
Authors: Jesamine C. Bartlett  et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-020-02792-2

Read the full article here.


The Thermodynamic Controls on Sulfide Saturation in Silicate Melts with Application to Ocean Floor Basalts

Abstract.

"A thermodynamic model to calculate the sulfide content at sulfide saturation or SCSS of basaltic and intermediate composition silicate melts has been built from four independently measurable thermodynamic entities, namely the standard state Gibbs free energy of the saturation reaction, the “sulfide capacity”, and the activities of FeO in[...]"

 

Source: AGU- Advancing Earth and Space Science 
Authors: Daniel R. Neuville et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119473206.ch10

Read the full article here. 


Recent Developments in Oxygen Minimum Zones Biogeochemistry

New Research Topic: Recent Developments in Oxygen Minimum Zones Biogeochemistry

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a key role in carbon, nitrogen and other elemental cycles, and directly impact climate dynamics by influencing air-sea fluxes of the potent greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. Oxygen concentrations, catalyze specialized micro-organisms to regulate chemical fluxes, which are critical for ecosystem functioning. The degree of deoxygenation in the OMZs vary from hypoxic in the tropical Atlantic Ocean to functionally anoxic in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the northern Indian Ocean.[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Read articles here.

 


Constraint on net primary productivity of the global ocean by Argo oxygen measurements

Abstract.

"The biological transformation of dissolved inorganic carbon to organic carbon during photosynthesis in the ocean, marine primary production, is a fundamental driver of biogeochemical cycling, ocean health and Earth’s climate system. The organic matter created supports oceanic food webs, including fisheries, and is an essential control on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Marine primary productivity is sensitive to changes due to climate forcing, but observing the response at the global scale[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience 
Authors: Kenneth S. Johnson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-021-00807-z

Read the full article here.


Transferring Complex Scientific Knowledge to Useable Products for Society: The Role of the Global Integrated Ocean Assessment and Challenges in the

Effective Delivery of Ocean Knowledge

Abstract.

"The ocean provides essential services to human wellbeing through climate regulation, provision of food, energy and livelihoods, protection of communities and nurturing of social and cultural values. Yet despite the ocean’s key role for all life, it is failing as a result of unsustainable human practices. The first global integrated assessment of the marine environment, produced by the United Nations under The Regular Process for Global Reporting and Assessment of the State of the Marine Environment, including Socioeconomic Aspects (the World Ocean Assessment), identified an overall decline in ocean health. The second assessment, launched in April 2021, although recognising some bright spots and improvements, stresses ongoing decline in the ocean[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Karen Evans et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fenvs.2021.626532

Read the full article here.


More than 1000 rivers account for 80% of global riverine plastic emissions into the ocean

Abstract.

"Plastic waste increasingly accumulates in the marine environment, but data on the distribution and quantification of riverine sources required for development of effective mitigation are limited. Our model approach includes geographically distributed data on plastic waste, land use, wind, precipitation, and rivers and calculates the probability for plastic waste to reach a river and subsequently the ocean. This probabilistic approach highlights regions that are likely to emit plastic into the ocean. We calibrated our model using recent field observations[...]".

 

Source: Science Advances 
Authors: LOURENS J. J. MEIJER et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaz5803

Read the full article here.


Hydrostatic pressure is the universal key driver of microbial evolution in the deep ocean and beyond

Abstract.

"Oceans cover approximately 70% of the Earth’s surface, and microbes comprise 90% of the ocean biomass and are regarded as an important ‘hidden’ driver of essential elemental cycling, such as carbon cycling, in the oceans (Karl, 2007; Salazar and Sunagawa, 2017). Although the general public – even many scientists – think of the oceans as unified, stable water systems, they contain varied environments, including extreme environments such as oxygen-deficient zones, oligotrophic open ocean, polar water regions, deep ocean[...]"

 

Source: Environmental Microbiology Reports
Authors: Xiang Xiao et al.
DOI: 10.1111/1758-2229.12915 

Read the full article here.


Toward a better understanding of fish-based contribution to ocean carbon flux

Abstract.

"Fishes are the dominant vertebrates in the ocean, yet we know little of their contribution to carbon export flux at regional to global scales. We synthesize the existing information on fish-based carbon flux in coastal and pelagic waters, identify gaps and challenges in measuring this flux and approaches to address them, and recommend research priorities. Based on our synthesis of passive (fecal pellet sinking) and active.[...]".

 

Source: ASLO- Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography
Authors: Grace K. Saba et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11709

Read the full article here.


Floating macrolitter leaked from Europe into the ocean

Abstract.

"Riverine systems act as converging pathways for discarded litter within drainage basins, becoming key elements in gauging the transfer of mismanaged waste into the ocean. However, riverine litter data are scarce and biased towards microplastics, generally lacking information about larger items. Based on the first ever database of riverine floating macrolitter across Europe, we have estimated that between 307 and 925 million litter items are released annually from Europe into the ocean[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Daniel González-Fernández et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-021-00722-6

Read the full article here.


Evolution of (Bio-)Geochemical Processes and Diagenetic Alteration of Sediments Along the Tectonic Migration of Ocean Floor in the Shikoku Basin off J

Abstract.

"Biogeochemical processes in subseafloor sediments are closely coupled to global element cycles. To improve the understanding of changes in biogeochemical conditions on geological timescales, we investigate sediment cores from a 1,180 m deep hole in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan (Site C0023) drilled during International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 370. During its tectonic migration from the Shikoku Basin to the Nankai Trough over the past 15 Ma, Site C0023 has experienced significant changes in[...]"

 

Source: AGU- Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: Male Köster et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GC009585

Read the full article here.


Fossil evidence for vampire squid inhabiting oxygen-depleted ocean zones since at least the Oligocene

Abstract.

"A marked 120 My gap in the fossil record of vampire squids separates the only extant species (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) from its Early Cretaceous, morphologically-similar ancestors. While the extant species possesses unique physiological adaptations to bathyal environments with low oxygen concentrations, Mesozoic vampyromorphs inhabited epicontinental shelves. However, the timing of their retreat towards bathyal and oxygen-depleted habitats is poorly documented. Here, we document a first record of a post-Mesozoic vampire squid from the Oligocene of the Central Paratethys represented[...]"

 

Source: Communications Biology
Authors: Martin Košťák et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-01714-0

Read the full article here.


The Ocean barcode atlas: A web service to explore the biodiversity and biogeography of marine organisms

Abstract.

"The Ocean Barcode Atlas (OBA) is a user friendly web service designed for biologists who wish to explore the biodiversity and biogeography of marine organisms locked in otherwise difficult to mine planetary scale DNA metabarcode data sets. Using just a web browser, a comprehensive picture of the diversity of a taxon or a barcode sequence is visualized graphically on world maps and interactive charts. Interactive results panels allow dynamic threshold adjustments and the display of diversity results[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Caroline Vernette et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1755-0998.13322

Read the full article here.


Variability-based constraint on ocean primary production models

Abstract.

"Primary production (PP) is fundamental to ocean biogeochemistry, but challengingly variable. Satellite models are unique tools for investigating PP, but are difficult to compare and validate because of the scale separation between in situ and remote measurements, which also are rarely coincident. Here, I argue that satellite estimates should be log-skew-normally distributed, because of this scale separation and because PP measurements are log-normally distributed.[...]"

 

Source: ASLO- Association for the Sciences of the Limnology and Oceanography 
Authors: B. B. Cael et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lol2.10196

Read the full article here.


Developing achievable alternate futures for key challenges during the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development

Abstract.

"The oceans face a range of complex challenges for which the impacts on society are highly uncertain but mostly negative. Tackling these challenges is testing society’s capacity to mobilise transformative action, engendering a sense of powerlessness. Envisaging positive but realistic visions of the future, and considering how current knowledge, resources, and technology could be used to achieve these futures, may lead to greater[...]"

 

Source: Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries
Authors: Kirsty L. Nash et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11160-021-09635-1

Read the full article here.


Protecting the global ocean for biodiversity, food and climate

Abstract.

"The ocean contains unique biodiversity, provides valuable food resources and is a major sink for anthropogenic carbon. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an effective tool for restoring ocean biodiversity and ecosystem services1,2, but at present only 2.7% of the ocean is highly protected3. This low level of ocean protection is due largely to conflicts with fisheries and other extractive uses. To address this issue[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Enric Sala et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03371-z

Read the full article here.


The effects of historical ozone changes on Southern Ocean heat uptake and storage

Abstract.

"Atmospheric ozone concentrations have dramatically changed in the last five decades of past century. Herein we explore the effects of historical ozone changes that include stratospheric ozone depletion on Southern Ocean heat uptake and storage, by comparing CESM1 large ensemble simulations with fixed-ozone experiment. During 1958–2005, the ozone changes contribute to about 50% of poleward intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds in historical simulations, which intensifies the Deacon Cell and residual meridional overturning circulation, thus contributing to heat redistribution[...]"

 

Source: Climate Dynamics
Authors: Shouwei Li et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00382-021-05803-y

Read the full article here.


Reactive Nitrogen Cycling in the Atmosphere and Ocean

Abstract.

"The budget of reactive nitrogen (Nr; oxidized and reduced inorganic and organic forms of nitrogen) has at least doubled since the preindustrial era due to human activities. Excess Nr causes significant detrimental effects on many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; less is known about the impact on the open ocean. Nr deposition may already rival biological N2 fixation quantitatively and will likely continue to rise.[...]"

 

Source: Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Authors: Katye E. Altieri et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-earth-083120-052147

Read the full article here.


Marine Litter Windrows: A Strategic Target to Understand and Manage the Ocean Plastic Pollution

Abstract.

"Windrow is a long-established term for the aggregations of seafoam, seaweeds, plankton and natural debris that appear on the ocean surface. Here, we define a “litter windrow” as any aggregation of floating litter at the submesoscale domain (<10 km horizontally), regardless of the force inducing the surface convergence, be it wind or other forces such as tides or density-driven currents. The marine litter windrows observed to date usually form stripes[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Andrés Cózar et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.571796

Read the full article here.


Heavy iron in large gem diamonds traces deep subduction of serpentinized ocean floor

Abstract.

"Subducting tectonic plates carry water and other surficial components into Earth’s interior. Previous studies suggest that serpentinized peridotite is a key part of deep recycling, but this geochemical pathway has not been directly traced. Here, we report Fe-Ni–rich metallic inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from a depth of 360 to 750 km with isotopically heavy iron (δ56Fe = 0.79 to 0.90‰) and unradiogenic osmium[...]"

 

Source: AAAS
Authors: Evan M. Smith et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abe9773

Read the full article here.


Ocean currents as a potential dispersal pathway for Antarctica’s most persistent non-native terrestrial insect

Abstract.

"The non-native midge Eretmoptera murphyi is Antarctica’s most persistent non-native insect and is known to impact the terrestrial ecosystems. It inhabits by considerably increasing litter turnover and availability of soil nutrients. The midge was introduced to Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, from its native South Georgia, and routes of dispersal to date have been aided by human activities, with little known about non-human-assisted methods of dispersal. This study is the first to determine the potential for dispersal [...]"

 

Source: Polar Biology
Authors: Jesamine C. Bartlett et al.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-020-02792-2

Read the full article here.


Trends and variability of ocean waves under RCP8.5 emission scenario in the Mediterranean Sea

Abstract.

"Wind-generated ocean waves are key inputs for several studies and applications, both near the coast (coastal vulnerability assessment, coastal structures design, harbor operativity) and off-shore (a.o. oil and gas production, ship routes, and navigation safety). As such, the evaluation of trends in future wave climate is fundamental for the development of efficient policies in the framework of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures. This study focuses[...]"

 

Source: Ocean Dynamics
Authors: Francesco De Leo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10236-020-01419-8

Read the full article here.


Can seafloor voltage cables be used to study large-scale circulation? An investigation in the Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"Marine electromagnetic (EM) signals largely depend on three factors: flow velocity, Earth's main magnetic field, and seawater's electrical conductivity (which depends on the local temperature and salinity). Because of this, there has been recent interest in using marine EM signals to monitor and study ocean circulation. Our study utilizes voltage data from retired seafloor telecommunication cables in the Pacific Ocean to examine whether such cables could be used to monitor circulation velocity or transport on large oceanic scales. We process the cable data to isolate the seasonal and monthly variations and then evaluate the correlation between the processed data and numerical predictions of the electric field[...]"

 

Source: EGU-European Geosciences Union
Authors: Jakub Velímský et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/os-17-383-2021

Read the full article here.


A global viral oceanography database (gVOD)

Abstract.

"Virioplankton are a key component of the marine biosphere in maintaining diversity of microorganisms and stabilizing ecosystems. They also contribute greatly to nutrient cycles/cycling by releasing organic matter after lysis of hosts. In this study, we constructed the first global viral oceanography database (gVOD) by collecting 10 931 viral abundance (VA) data and 727 viral production (VP) data, along with host and relevant oceanographic parameters when available. Most VA data were obtained in the North Atlantic (32 %) and North Pacific (29 %) oceans, while the southeast Pacific[...]"

 

Source: Earth System Science Data 
Authors: Le Xie et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-13-1251-2021

Read the full article here.


How deep ocean-land coupling controls the generation of secondary microseism Love waves

Abstract.

"Wind driven ocean wave-wave interactions produce continuous Earth vibrations at the seafloor called secondary microseisms. While the origin of associated Rayleigh waves is well understood, there is currently no quantified explanation for the existence of Love waves in the most energetic region of the microseism spectrum (3–10 s). Here, using terrestrial seismic arrays and 3D synthetic acoustic-elastic simulations combined with ocean wave hindcast data, we demonstrate that, observed from land[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Florian Le Pape et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22591-5

Read the full article here.


A committed fourfold increase in ocean oxygen loss

Abstract.

"Less than a quarter of ocean deoxygenation that will ultimately be caused by historical CO2 emissions is already realized, according to millennial-scale model simulations that assume zero CO2 emissions from year 2021 onwards. About 80% of the committed oxygen loss occurs below 2000 m depth, where a more sluggish overturning circulation will increase water residence times and accumulation of respiratory oxygen demand. According to the model results, the deep ocean will thereby lose more than 10% of its pre-industrial oxygen content even if CO2 emissions and thus global warming[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Andreas Oschlies 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22584-4

Read the full article here.


A pole-to-equator ocean ousverturning circulation on Encelad

Abstract.

"Enceladus is believed to have a saltwater global ocean, heated at the ocean–core interface and losing heat to the floating ice shell above. This configuration suggests an important role for vertical convection. The ice shell has dramatic meridional thickness variations that, in steady state, must be sustained by the ocean circulation against processes acting to remove these anomalies. This could be achieved through spatially separated regions of freezing and melting at the ocean–ice interface. Here, we use an idealized[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authours: Ana H. Lobo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-021-00706-3

Read the full article here.


Iron isotopes trace primordial magma ocean cumulates melting in Earth’s upper mantle

Abstract.

"The differentiation of Earth ~4.5 billion years (Ga) ago is believed to have culminated in magma ocean crystallization, crystal-liquid separation, and the formation of mineralogically distinct mantle reservoirs. However, the magma ocean model remains difficult to validate because of the scarcity of geochemical tracers of lower mantle mineralogy. The Fe isotope compositions (δ57Fe) of ancient mafic rocks can be used to reconstruct the mineralogy of their mantle source regions. We present Fe isotope data for 3.7-Ga metabasalts from the Isua Supracrustal Belt (Greenland). The δ57Fe signatures[...]"

 

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Helen M. Williams et al.
DOI:10.1126/sciadv.abc7394

Read the full article here.


Opposite response of strong and moderate positive Indian Ocean Dipole to global warming

Abstract.

"A strong positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) induces weather extremes such as the 2019 Australian bushfires and African floods. The impact is influenced by sea surface temperature (SST), yet models disagree on how pIOD SST may respond to greenhouse warming. Here we find increased SST variability of strong pIOD events, with strong equatorial eastern Indian Ocean cool anomalies, but decreased variability of moderate pIOD events, dominated by western warm anomalies[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Wenju Cai et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00943-1

Read the full article here.


An integrated framework for lean manufacturing in relation with blue ocean manufacturing - A case study

Abstract.

"Lean Manufacturing (LM) has traditionally helped industries in removing the non-value-added processes to achieve operational excellence. Similarly, the blue ocean strategy helps organizations in creating an uncontested market space where the competition is irrelevant. The authors posit that the integration of two approaches helps in achieving holistic manufacturing excellence, and there is a paucity of approaches that integrate the two paradigms. In order to fill this research gap, the authors have developed an integrated framework that combines the concepts of lean[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Saba Sadiq et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.123790

Read the full article here.


Protecting the global ocean biodiversity, food and climate

Abstract.

"The ocean contains unique biodiversity, provides valuable food resources and is a major sink for anthropogenic carbon. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an effective tool for restoring ocean biodiversity and ecosystem services1,2, but at present only 2.7% of the ocean is highly protected3. This low level of ocean protection is due largely to conflicts with fisheries and other extractive uses. To address this issue, here we developed a conservation planning framework to prioritize highly protected MPAs in places that would result in multiple benefits today and in the future. We find that a substantial increase in ocean protection could have triple benefits, by protecting biodiversity[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Enric Sala et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03371-z

Read the full article here.


Role of tide-induced vertical mixing in the deep Pacific Ocean circulation

Abstract.

"We investigate the control mechanisms of the deep Pacific Ocean circulation by introducing updated methods for parameterizing tidal mixing. The column-integrated rates of dissipation in near- and far-fields are derived from the tidal energy conversion and dissipation rates estimated by a high resolution tide model. In the calculation of the far-field mixing, its dependency on stratification is taken into account based on theoretical and observational knowledge.Unlike previous studies that did not take the stratification dependence into account, the far-field mixing does not function to significantly enhance the deep Pacific Ocean circulation. The deep Pacific Ocean circulation is also found to be insensitive to the decay scale height of the near-field mixing. However, these factors affect the reproducibility of the[...]"

 

Source: Journal of Oceanography
Authors: Takao Kawasaki et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10872-020-00584-0

Read the full article here.


Atlantic Ocean science diplomacy in action: the pole-to-pole All Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance

Abstract.

"The ocean provides important ecosystem services to society, but its health is in crisis due to the impacts of human activities. Ocean sustainability requires ambitious levels of scientific evidence to support governance and management of human activities that impact the ocean. However, due to the size, complexity and connectivity of the ocean, monitoring and data collection presupposes high investments, and nations need to cooperate to deliver the ambitious, costly science that is required to inform decisions[...]"

 

Source: Nature - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications
Authors: Andrei Polejack et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-021-00729-6

Read the full article here.


Emerging Solutions to Return Nature to the Urban Ocean

Abstract.

"Urban and periurban ocean developments impact 1.5% of the global exclusive economic zones, and the demand for ocean space and resources is increasing. As we strive for a more sustainable future, it is imperative that we better design, manage, and conserve urban ocean spaces for both humans and nature. We identify three key objectives for more sustainable urban oceans: reduction of urban pressures, protection and restoration of ocean ecosystems, and support of critical ecosystem services. We describe an array of emerging evidence-based approaches, including greening grayinfrastructure, restoring habitats, and developing biotechnologies.

 

Source: ANNUAL REVIEWS
Authors: Laura Airoldi et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-032020-020015

Read the full article here.


Fossil evidence for vampire squid inhabiting oxygen-depleted ocean zones since at least the Oligocene

Abstract.

"A marked 120 My gap in the fossil record of vampire squids separates the only extant species (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) from its Early Cretaceous, morphologically-similar ancestors. While the extant species possesses unique physiological adaptations to bathyal environments with low oxygen concentrations, Mesozoic vampyromorphs inhabited epicontinental shelves. However, the timing of their retreat towards bathyal and oxygen-depleted habitats is poorly documented. Here, we document a first record of a post-Mesozoic vampire squid from the Oligocene of the Central Paratethys[...]"

Source: Nature - Communications Biology
Authors: Martin Košťák et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-01714-0

Read the full article here.


Mixing by Oceanic Lee Waves

Abstract.

"Oceanic lee waves are generated in the deep stratified ocean by the flow of ocean currents over sea floor topography, and when they break, they can lead to mixing in the stably stratified ocean interior. While the theory of linear lee waves is well established, the nonlinear mechanisms leading to mixing are still under investigation. Tidally driven lee waves have long been observed in the ocean, along with associated mixing, but observations of lee waves forced by geostrophic eddies are relatively sparse and largely indirect[...]"

 

Source: Annual Reviews
Authors: Sonya Legg
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-fluid-051220-043904

Read the full article here.


Microbial niche differentiation explains nitrite oxidation in marine oxygen minimum zones

Abstract.

"Nitrite is a pivotal component of the marine nitrogen cycle. The fate of nitrite determines the loss or retention of fixed nitrogen, an essential nutrient for all organisms. Loss occurs via anaerobic nitrite reduction to gases during denitrification and anammox, while retention occurs via nitrite oxidation to nitrate. Nitrite oxidation is usually represented in biogeochemical models by one kinetic parameter and one oxygen threshold, below which nitrite oxidation is set to zero. Here we find that the responses of nitrite oxidation[...]"

Source: Nature
Authors: Xin Sun et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-020-00852-3

Read the full article here.


Ocean Optimism: Moving Beyond the Obituaries in Marine Conservation

Abstract.

"While the ocean has suffered many losses, there is increasing evidence that important progress is being made in marine conservation. Examples include striking recoveries of once-threatened species, increasing rates of protection of marine habitats, more sustainably managed fisheries and aquaculture, reductions in some forms of pollution, accelerating restoration of degraded habitats, and use of the ocean and its habitats to sequester carbon and provide clean energy. Many of these achievements have multiple benefits[...]"

 

Source: Annual Reviews
Authors: Nancy Knowlton
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-040220-101608

Read the full article here.


Around one third of current Arctic Ocean primary production sustained by rivers and coastal erosion

Abstract.
 

"Net primary production (NPP) is the foundation of the oceans’ ecosystems and the fisheries they support. In the Arctic Ocean, NPP is controlled by a complex interplay of light and nutrients supplied by upwelling as well as lateral inflows from adjacent oceans and land. But so far, the role of the input from land by rivers and coastal erosion has not been given much attention. Here, by upscaling observations from the six largest rivers and using measured coastal erosion rates, we construct a pan-Arctic[...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Jens Terhaar et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20470-z

Read the full article here.


Status and trends of Arctic Ocean environmental change and its impacts on marine biogeochemistry: Findings from the ArCS project

Abstract.

"Ocean observation research theme under ArCS project, “Theme 4: Observational research on Arctic Ocean environmental changes”, aimed to elucidate the status and trends of ongoing Arctic Ocean environmental changes and to evaluate their impacts on Arctic marine ecosystem and the global climate system. For these purposes, we conducted field observations, mooring observations, laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and international collaborative research focusing on the Pacific Arctic[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Takashi Kikuchi et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polar.2021.100639

Read the full article here.


Assimilating synthetic Biogeochemical-Argo and ocean colour observations into a global ocean model to inform observing system design

Abstract.

"A set of observing system simulation experiments was performed. This assessed the impact on global ocean biogeochemical reanalyses of assimilating chlorophyll from remotely sensed ocean colour and in situ observations of chlorophyll, nitrate, oxygen, and pH from a proposed array of Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) floats. Two potential BGC-Argo array distributions were tested: one for which biogeochemical sensors are placed on all current Argo floats and one for which biogeochemical sensors are placed on a quarter of current Argo floats. Assimilating BGC-Argo data greatly improved model results throughout the water column[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: David Ford et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-509-2021

Read the full article here.


Sensitivity of 21st-century projected ocean new production changes to idealized biogeochemical model structure

Abstract.

"While there is agreement that global warming over the 21st century is likely to influence the biological pump, Earth system models (ESM) display significant divergence in their projections of future new production. This paper quantifies and interprets the sensitivity of projected changes in new production in an idealized global ocean-biogeochemistry model. The model includes two tracers that explicitly represent nutrient transport, light- and nutrient-limited nutrient uptake by the ecosystem (new production), and export via sinking organic particles. Globally, new production declines with warming due to reduced surface nutrient availability, as expected. However, the magnitude[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Genevieve Jay Brett et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-479

Read the full article here.


Recent Changes in Deep Ventilation of the Mediterranean Sea; Evidence From Long-Term Transient Tracer Observations

Abstract.

"The Mediterranean Sea is a small region of the global ocean but with a very active overturning circulation that allows surface perturbations to be transported to the interior ocean. Understanding of ventilation is important for understanding and predicting climate change and its impact on ocean ecosystems. To quantify changes of deep ventilation, we investigated the spatiotemporal variability of transient tracers (i.e., CFC-12 and SF6) observations combined with temporal evolution of hydrographic and oxygen observations in the Mediterranean Sea from 13 cruises conducted during 1987–2018, with emphasize on the update from 2011 to 2018. Spatially, both the Eastern and Western Mediterranean Deep Water (EMDW and WMDW) show a general west-to-east gradient[...]"

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Pingyang Li et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.00594

Read the full article here.


Multi‐Century Impacts of Ice Sheet Retreat on Sea Level and Ocean Tides in Hudson Bay

Abstract.

"Past and modern large‐scale ice sheet loss results in geographically variable sea level changes. At present, in Hudson Bay, Canada, sea level is decreasing due to glacial isostatic adjustment, which represents a departure from the globally averaged sea level rise. However, there are large uncertainties in future sea level trends with further polar ice sheet retreat in the coming centuries. Sea level changes affect ocean tides considerably because tides are highly sensitive to changes in bathymetry. Here, we present multi‐century sea level projections associated with a suite of past and future ice loss scenarios and consider the impact of these changes on ocean tides[...]"

Source: Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: A.‐M. Hayden et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015104

Read the full article here.


New Webinar Series on Ocean Deoxygenation

New Webinar Series on Ocean Deoxygenation
Do you want to know more about deoxygenation in the ocean?
Join us for the upcoming webinar!

The Global Ocean Oxygen Network (IOC Expert Working Group GO2NE) starts a new series on ocean deoxygenation. The first webinar will take place 11 November 2020. The speakers will present latest science on the impacts of reduced oxygen in the open ocean and coastal zones. Each webinar will feature two presentations by a more senior and an earlier-career scientist, 20 minutes each followed by 10 minutes moderated discussion sessions.

When? Wednesday, 11th November 2020, 14:00 h – 15:00 h CET

To register please click here.


Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability

Abstract.

"Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from the Redfield ratio, the molar ratio of oxygen to organic carbon consumed during respiration (i.e., the respiration quotient, r −O2:C  r−O2:C ) is consistently assumed constant but rarely, if ever, measured. Using a prognostic[...]"

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Allison R. Moreno et al.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004986117

Read the full article here.


Ocean acidification could doom key Arctic fish species: study

Ocean acidification combined with warming of the world oceans and loss of oxygen is having a severe impact on key Arctic marine species such as polar cod in the Barents Sea, according to a new study conducted by German scientists.

 

"The eight-year interdisciplinary study, which began in 2009 and involved more than 250 scientist in the German research network on ocean acidification BIOACID (Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification), investigated how different marine species respond to ocean acidification – a change in the ocean chemistry that occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere dissolves in seawater.

In addition to ocean acidification, the study, Exploring Ocean Change: Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification, also examined the cascading effect of other stressors such as ocean warming, deoxygenation, overfishing and eutrophication – the increased concentration of nutrients in estuaries and coastal waters that causes harmful algal blooms, ocean dead zones and fish kills. [...]"

Source: The Independent Barents Observer

Read the full article here.

 


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