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Transferring Complex Scientific Knowledge to Useable Products for Society: The Role of the Global Integrated Ocean Assessment and Challenges in the

Effective Delivery of Ocean Knowledge

Abstract.

"The ocean provides essential services to human wellbeing through climate regulation, provision of food, energy and livelihoods, protection of communities and nurturing of social and cultural values. Yet despite the ocean’s key role for all life, it is failing as a result of unsustainable human practices. The first global integrated assessment of the marine environment, produced by the United Nations under The Regular Process for Global Reporting and Assessment of the State of the Marine Environment, including Socioeconomic Aspects (the World Ocean Assessment), identified an overall decline in ocean health. The second assessment, launched in April 2021, although recognising some bright spots and improvements, stresses ongoing decline in the ocean[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Karen Evans et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fenvs.2021.626532

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Floating macrolitter leaked from Europe into the ocean

Abstract.

"Riverine systems act as converging pathways for discarded litter within drainage basins, becoming key elements in gauging the transfer of mismanaged waste into the ocean. However, riverine litter data are scarce and biased towards microplastics, generally lacking information about larger items. Based on the first ever database of riverine floating macrolitter across Europe, we have estimated that between 307 and 925 million litter items are released annually from Europe into the ocean[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Daniel González-Fernández et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-021-00722-6

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Evolution of (Bio-)Geochemical Processes and Diagenetic Alteration of Sediments Along the Tectonic Migration of Ocean Floor in the Shikoku Basin off J

Abstract.

"Biogeochemical processes in subseafloor sediments are closely coupled to global element cycles. To improve the understanding of changes in biogeochemical conditions on geological timescales, we investigate sediment cores from a 1,180 m deep hole in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan (Site C0023) drilled during International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 370. During its tectonic migration from the Shikoku Basin to the Nankai Trough over the past 15 Ma, Site C0023 has experienced significant changes in[...]"

 

Source: AGU- Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: Male Köster et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GC009585

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Temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration in the Pacific Ocean at the northern region of the oxygen minimum zone off Mexico between the last two

Abstract.

"The changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration in the Pacific Ocean in the northern region of the shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Mexico were analyzed on the basis of the Word Ocean Database and a series of oceanographic cruises (LEGOZ-Mex). In order to test the changes in both parameters between two similar oceanographic scenarios according to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), a comparison was made between the last two cool PDO phases of 1962–1974 and 2002–2012 when conditions[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: E.D.Sánchez-Pérez et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2021.103607

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Variability-based constraint on ocean primary production models

Abstract.

"Primary production (PP) is fundamental to ocean biogeochemistry, but challengingly variable. Satellite models are unique tools for investigating PP, but are difficult to compare and validate because of the scale separation between in situ and remote measurements, which also are rarely coincident. Here, I argue that satellite estimates should be log-skew-normally distributed, because of this scale separation and because PP measurements are log-normally distributed.[...]"

 

Source: ASLO- Association for the Sciences of the Limnology and Oceanography 
Authors: B. B. Cael et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lol2.10196

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Seaweed farms provide refugia from ocean acidification

Abstract.

"Seaweed farming has been proposed as a strategy for adaptation to ocean acidification, but evidence is largely lacking. Changes of pH and carbon system parameters in surface waters of three seaweed farms along a latitudinal range in China were compared, on the weeks preceding harvesting, with those of the surrounding seawaters. Results confirmed that seaweed farming is efficient in buffering acidification, with Saccharina japonica showing the highest capacity of 0.10 pH increase within the aquaculture area[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Xi Xiao et al
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145192

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