News

Widespread marine euxinia along the western Yangtze Platform caused by oxygen minimum zone expansion during the Capitanian mass extinction

Abstract.

"The development of widespread marine anoxic and/or euxinic conditions has been proposed as a likely driver of the mid-Capitanian mass extinction. However, the driving mechanisms and spatiotemporal evolution of anoxia/euxinia remain poorly constrained. In order to decipher changes in marine redox conditions and their possible influence on the mid-Capitanian biotic crisis, we applied multiple geochemical indicators to three sections across a shelf-to-basin transect in the Middle Permian Kuhfeng and Lower Yinping formations of the Lower Yangtze Basin, South China. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Bolin Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104273

Read the full article here.


Widespread marine euxinia along the western Yangtze Platform caused by oxygen minimum zone expansion during the Capitanian mass extinction

Abstract.

"The development of widespread marine anoxic and/or euxinic conditions has been proposed as a likely driver of the mid-Capitanian mass extinction. However, the driving mechanisms and spatiotemporal evolution of anoxia/euxinia remain poorly constrained. In order to decipher changes in marine redox conditions and their possible influence on the mid-Capitanian biotic crisis, we applied multiple geochemical indicators to three sections across a shelf-to-basin transect in the Middle Permian Kuhfeng and Lower Yinping formations of the Lower Yangtze Basin, South China. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Bolin Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104273

Read the full article here.


Mercury isotope evidence for recurrent photic-zone euxinia triggered by enhanced terrestrial nutrient inputs during the Late Devonian mass extinction

Abstract.

"Widespread oceanic anoxia marked by globally extensive deposition of organic-rich black shale during the Late Devonian was a major factor in the mass extinctions at the Frasnian-Famennian (FFB, ∼372 million years ago) and Devonian-Carboniferous boundaries (DCB, ∼359 million years ago), although the triggers for these deoxygenation events are still under debate. Here, we apply a novel paleoredox proxy, Hg isotopes, to investigate Late Devonian ocean redox variation and its causes. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Wang Zheng et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2023.118175

Read the full article here.


Oceanic anoxic events, photic-zone euxinia, and controversy of sea-level fluctuations during the Middle-Late Devonian

Abstract.

"This paper reviews global records of anoxic events of the Middle Devonian – earliest Mississippian, as well as the possible triggers and controls of these events. These “anoxic events” are complex multistage paleoenvironmental disturbances manifested in multiple proxies, which we showcase with the Horn River Group (HRG) – a succession of basinal organic-rich shales and cherts deposited during the latest Eifelian – earliest Late Frasnian(∼386–373 My ago) on the western continental margin of Laurentia near the paleo-equator. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Pavel Kabanov et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2023.104415

Read the full article here.


Salinity variations of the inner Yangtze Sea during the Ordovician-Silurian transition and its influences on marginal marine euxinia

Abstract.

"The Ordovician-Silurian transition (OST) is a critical geological interval, during which dramatic climatic, environmental and biological changes occurred. Although expanded euxinic conditions have been regarded as one of the main causes of Late Ordovician mass extinction (LOME), the controls of euxinia remain the topic of debate. In this study, we evaluate the paleosalinity conditions of the inner Yangtze Sea (IYS) during the OST using a combination of paleosalinity proxies (B/Ga, Sr/Ba, and S/TOC). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Guangyao Cao et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104129

Read the full article here.


Basin-scale reconstruction of euxinia and Late Devonian mass extinctions

Abstract. 

"The Devonian–Carboniferous transition marks a fundamental shift in the surface environment primarily related to changes in ocean–atmosphere oxidation states, resulting from the continued proliferation of vascular land plants that stimulated the hydrological cycle and continental weathering, glacioeustasy, eutrophication and anoxic expansion in epicontinental seas, and mass extinction events. Here we present a comprehensive spatial and temporal compilation of geochemical data from 90 cores across the entire Bakken Shale (Williston Basin, North America). [...]".

 

Source: Nature 
Authors: Swapan K. Sahoo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-023-05716-2

Read the full article here.


Euxinia and hydrographic restriction in the Tethys Ocean: Reassessing global oceanic anoxia during the early Toarcian

Abstract. 

"Despite carbon-cycle perturbations at a global scale during the early Toarcian, the extent of anoxia during the ∼182-Ma Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) remains in debate. A common factor in the development of oceanic anoxia is watermass restriction, which is thought to have been important in the NW European Seaway, but whose influence elsewhere is relatively unstudied. Here, we analyze Mo/TOC (a proxy for watermass restriction) and redox proxies (e.g., Corg/P) in two sections of the Asturian Basin (northern Iberian Paleomargin), and we integrate these results with data from a suite of global Toarcian sections in order to reassess [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Javier Fernández-Martínez et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.104026

Read the full article here.


Major Early-Middle Devonian oceanic oxygenation linked to early land plant evolution detected using high-resolution U isotopes of marine limestones

Abstract.

"The middle Paleozoic (∼420-350 Myr) records a major increase in ocean-atmosphere oxygen levels; however, the timing and pattern of oxygenation are poorly constrained. Two well-dated North American locations in Nevada and Illinois were used to generate a high-resolution U-isotopic profile (U) spanning ∼70 Myr of the middle Paleozoic. Stratigraphic and geochemical data support the interpretation that the Nevada profile represents a near-primary record of global-ocean redox variations. First-order U trends indicate strongly reducing oceans during the late Silurian and Early Devonian, terminated by a major oxygenation event near the Emsian-Eifelian boundary (∼395 Ma). More oxic seawater conditions persisted for the next 30+ Myr, but were punctuated by multiple Myr-scale anoxic events during the Middle-Late Devonian and Early Mississippian that correlate with known global biotic crises, positive C excursions, and widespread organic-rich facies deposition. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Maya Elrick et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117410

Read the full article here.


Ocean euxinia and climate change "double whammy" drove the Late Ordovician mass extinction

Abstract.

"The Late Ordovician mass extinction (LOME, ca. 445 Ma) was the first of the "Big Five" Phanerozoic extinction events and comprised two extinction pulses. Proposed kill mechanisms include glacially induced global cooling and the expansion of water-column anoxia and/or euxinia (sulfidic conditions), but no general consensus has been reached with regard to the precise role of these mechanisms. [...]"

Source: Geology
Authors: Caineng Zou et al.
DOI: 10.1130/G40121.1

Read the full article here.


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