News

Effects of water flow and ocean acidification on oxygen and pH gradients in coral boundary layer

Abstract.

"Reef-building corals live in highly hydrodynamic environments, where water flow largely controls the complex chemical microenvironments surrounding them—the concentration boundary layer (CBL). The CBL may be key to alleviate ocean acidification (OA) effects on coral colonies by partially isolating them. However, OA effects on coral CBL remain poorly understood, particularly under different flow velocities. Here, we investigated these effects on the reef-building corals Acropora cythereaPocillopora verrucosa, and Porites cylindrica. [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Catarina P. P. Martins et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-024-63210-9

Read the full article here.


Editorial: Drivers and consequences of ocean deoxygenation in tropical ecosystems

Abstract.

"Coastal habitats are under increasing anthropogenic pressures that jeopardize the survival and persistence of ecologically important marine life. One such stressor, increasingly recognized as a significant threat to marine coastal habitats, is deoxygenation (Breitburg et al., 2018; IPCC, 2023). The United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development has identified deoxygenation as a top international priority for ocean research, with efforts being led by the Global Ocean Oxygen Network (GO2NE) and affiliated programs (Global Ocean Oxygen Decade program). [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Maggie D. Johnson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1425902

Read the full article here.


Effect of nutrient reductions on dissolved oxygen and pH: a case study of Narragansett bay

Abstract.

"To assess the consequences of nutrient reduction strategies on water quality under climate change, we investigated the long-term dynamics of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH in Narragansett Bay (NB), a warming urbanized estuary in Rhode Island, where nitrogen loads have declined due to extensive wastewater treatment plant upgrades. We use 15 years (January 2005-December 2019) of measurements from the Narragansett Bay Fixed Site Monitoring network. Nutrient-enhanced phytoplankton growth can increase DO in the upper water column while subsequent respiration can reduce water column DO and enhance bottom water acidification, and vice-versa. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Hongjie Wang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1374873

Read the full article here.


Emergent constraint on oxygenation of the upper South Eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone in the twenty-first century

Abstract.

"As a consequence of on-going global warming, the ocean is losing oxygen, which has implications not only in terms of marine resources management and food supply but also in terms of the potentially important feedback on the global carbon cycle and climate. Of particular scrutiny are the extended zones of already low levels of oxygen called the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) embedded in the subsurface waters of the productive Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS). These OMZs are currently diversely simulated by state-of-the-art Earth System Models (ESM) hampering a reliable projection of ocean deoxygenation on marine ecosystem services in these regions. [...]".

 

Source: Nature 
Authors: Ivan Almendra et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-024-01427-2

Read the full article here.


GO2NE Webinar on Ocean Deoxygenation

GO2NE Webinar on Ocean Deoxygenation. 

"Do you want to know more about deoxygenation in the ocean?
Join us for the upcoming webinar!

Wednesday, 12 June 2024, 15:00 h – 16:00 CEST

Registration link

Join the Global Ocean Oxygen Network (IOC Expert Working Group GO2NE) for a special session of its webinar series on ocean deoxygenation to mark World Ocean Day 2024. The 29th webinar will take place on 12 June 2024, 1500 CEST. The webinar will feature presentations by GO2NE Co-Chairs Andreas Oschlies and Caroline Slomp and expert working group member Karin Limburg, speaking on the latest global scientific efforts to understand, mitigate and adapt to ocean deoxygenation and the most recent work of GO2NE and its members. 

If you are interested in presenting at one of the upcoming webinars, please submit a short abstract here.

Speakers:

Andreas Oschlies (GEOMAR, Germany)
Caroline Slomp (Radboud University, The Netherlands)
Karin Limburg (SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, USA)

If you want to receive further information about upcoming webinars, please register here." 


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Oxygen declination in the coastal ocean over the twenty-first century: Driving forces, trends, and impacts

Abstract.

"Oxygen declination in coastal oceans has accelerated drastically in recent decades, both in terms of severity and spatial extent, and such disappearance of oxygen leads to dead zones where life can't survive. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to nutrient pollution and climate change due to intensified anthropogenic activities. The annual statistical oxygen mean concentrations showed the current deoxygenation trends based on (WOA_2001–2018) data comparison of 200 m below the surface water from the first two decades of the 21st century. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Md Mesbah Uddin Bhuiyan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cscee.2024.100621

Read the full article here.


Preprint: ISASO2 : Recent trends and regional patterns of Ocean Dissolved Oxygen change

Abstract.

"Recent estimates of the global inventory of dissolved oxygen (DO) have suggested a decrease of 2 % since the 1960s. However, due to the sparse historical oxygen data coverage, the DO inventory exhibits large regional uncertainties at interannual timescale. Using ISASO2, a new DO Argo-based optimally interpolated climatology https://doi.org/10.17882/52367 (Kolodziejczyk et al.,2021), we have estimated an updated regional oxygen inventory. Over the long term (~1980–2013), comparing the ISASO2 Argo fields with the first guess WOA18 built from the DO bottle samples fields extracted from WOD18, the broad tendency to global ocean deoxygenation remains robust in the upper 2000 m with -451±243 Tmol per decade. [...]".

 

Source: Earth System Science Data
Authors: Nicolas Kolodziejczyk et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2024-106

Read the full article here.


Preprint: The influence of zooplankton and oxygen on the particulate organic carbon flux in the Benguela Upwelling System

Abstract.

"We conducted extensive sediment trap experiments in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) in the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean to study the influence of zooplankton on the flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) through the water column and its sedimentation. Two long term moored and sixteen short term free-floating sediment trap systems were deployed. The mooring experiments were conducted for several years and the sixteen drifters were deployed on three different research cruises between 2019 and 2021. Zooplankton was separated from the trapped material and divided into 8 different zooplankton groups. [...]".

 

Source: EGUsphere 
Authors: Luisa Chiara Meiritz et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-700

Read the full article here.


Disparity between Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and Toarcian carbon isotope excursion

Abstract.

"The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, Early Jurassic) is marked by widespread marine deoxygenation and deposition of organic carbon (OC)-rich strata. The genesis of the T-OAE is thought to be associated with environmental changes caused by the emission of 12C-enriched greenhouse gasses (CO2, CH4), manifested in a negative Toarcian carbon isotope excursion (nT-CIE). The nT-CIE is commonly used to stratigraphically define the T-OAE, and despite the complex interrelationship of the different environmental phenomena, both terms (nT-CIE and T-OAE) are commonly used interchangeable. [...]".

 

Source: Springer Nature
Authors: Wolfgang Ruebsam & Lorenz Schwark 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00531-024-02408-8

Read the full article here.


Preprint: Reviews and syntheses: Biological Indicators of Oxygen Stress in Water Breathing Animals

Abstract.

"Anthropogenic warming and nutrient over-enrichment of our oceans have resulted in significant, and often catastrophic, reductions in dissolved oxygen (deoxygenation). Stress on water-breathing animals from this deoxygenation has been shown to occur at all levels of biological organization: cellular; organ; individual; species; population; community; and ecosystem. Most climate forecasts predict increases in ocean deoxygenation, thus it is essential to develop reliable biological indicators of oxygen stress that can be used by regional and global oxygen monitoring efforts to detect and assess the impacts of deoxygenation on ocean life. [...]".

 

Source: EGUsphere 
Authors: Michael R. Roman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-616

Read the full article here.


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