News

Stepwise oxygenation of early Cambrian ocean controls early metazoan diversification

Abstract.

"The Ediacaran–Cambrian transition is a critical period in Earth history, during which both marine environment and life experienced drastic changes. It was suggested that pervasive oxygenation and associated chemical changes in the ocean have potentially triggered the rapid diversification of early Cambrian metazoans. The timing and process of ocean oxygenation, however, have not been well constrained. [...]"

Source: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
Authors: Xiangkuan Zhao et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.05.009

Read the full article here.


Oxygen minimum zone cryptic sulfur cycling sustained by offshore transport of key sulfur oxidizing bacteria

Abstract.

"Members of the gammaproteobacterial clade SUP05 couple water column sulfide oxidation to nitrate reduction in sulfidic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Their abundance in offshore OMZ waters devoid of detectable sulfide has led to the suggestion that local sulfate reduction fuels SUP05-mediated sulfide oxidation in a so-called “cryptic sulfur cycle”. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Cameron M. Callbeck et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-04041-x

Read the full article here.


Global Insurance Industry Steps Up to Turn Ocean Risk Into Resilience

At the Ocean Risk Summit in Bermuda, experts gathered to advance a new model for how insurance and reinsurance companies can leverage their products and balance sheets to restore marine ecosystems and slow climate change impacts.

"When Hurricane Irma smashed into the British Virgin Islands last September at speeds faster than a jumbo jet at takeoff, the devastation was total. The storm caused damage valued at three times more than the Caribbean islands’ entire gross domestic product, while the territory’s economy – including its biggest industry, tourism – shut down for months. [...]"

Source: Oceans Deeply

Read the full article here.


The Baltic Sea as a time machine for the future coastal ocean

Abstract.

"Coastal global oceans are expected to undergo drastic changes driven by climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures in coming decades. Predicting specific future conditions and assessing the best management strategies to maintain ecosystem integrity and sustainable resource use are difficult, because of multiple interacting pressures, uncertain projections, and a lack of test cases for management. [...]"

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Thorsten B. H. Reusch et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar8195

Read the full article here.


Will ocean zones with low oxygen levels expand or shrink?

"Computer simulations show that areas of the ocean that have low levels of dissolved oxygen will expand, but then shrink, in response to global warming — adding to an emerging picture of the finely balanced processes involved.

Global warming has reduced the amount of dissolved oxygen in the ocean by 2% since 1960. A major concern is that the rate of loss of dissolved oxygen has already increased by up to 20% in tropical waters, expanding the volume of regions called oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where levels of dissolved oxygen are already very low. [...]"

Source: nature.com

Read the full article here.


A Sixteen-year Decline in Dissolved Oxygen in the Central California Current

Abstract.

"A potential consequence of climate change is global decrease in dissolved oxygen at depth in the oceans due to changes in the balance of ventilation, mixing, respiration, and photosynthesis. We present hydrographic cruise observations of declining dissolved oxygen collected along CalCOFI Line 66.7 (Line 67) off of Monterey Bay, in the Central California Current region, and investigate likely mechanisms.  [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Alice S. Ren et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-25341-8

Read the full article here.


The competing impacts of climate change and nutrient reductions on dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay

Abstract.

"The Chesapeake Bay region is projected to experience changes in temperature, sea level, and precipitation as a result of climate change. This research uses an estuarine-watershed hydrodynamic–biogeochemical modeling system along with projected mid-21st-century changes in temperature, freshwater flow, and sea level rise to explore the impact climate change may have on future Chesapeake Bay dissolved-oxygen (DO) concentrations and the potential success of nutrient reductions in attaining mandated estuarine water quality improvements. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Isaac D. Irby et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-15-2649-2018

Read the full article here.


Coupling of oceanic carbon and nitrogen facilitates spatially resolved quantitative reconstruction of nitrate inventories

Abstract.

"Anthropogenic impacts are perturbing the global nitrogen cycle via warming effects and pollutant sources such as chemical fertilizers and burning of fossil fuels. Understanding controls on past nitrogen inventories might improve predictions for future global biogeochemical cycling. Here we show the quantitative reconstruction of deglacial bottom water nitrate concentrations from intermediate depths of the Peruvian upwelling region, using foraminiferal pore density. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Nicolaas Glock et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03647-5

Read the full article here.


Oxygen Saturation Surrounding Deep Water Formation Events in the Labrador Sea From Argo‐O2 Data

Abstract.

"Deep water formation supplies oxygen‐rich water to the deep sea, spreading throughout the ocean by means of the global thermohaline circulation. Models suggest that dissolved gases in newly formed deep water do not come to equilibrium with the atmosphere. However, direct measurements during wintertime convection are scarce, and the controls over the extent of these disequilibria are poorly quantified [...]"

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: Mitchell K. Wolf et al.
DOI: 10.1002/2017GB005829

Read the full article here.


New insights into Cenomanian paleoceanography and climate evolution from the Tarfaya Basin, southern Morocco

Abstract.

"A 325 m long continuous succession of uppermost Albian to lower Turonian pelagic (outer shelf) deposits was recovered from a new drill site in the central part of the Tarfaya Basin (southern Morocco). Natural gamma ray wireline logging, carbonate and organic carboncontent, bulk carbonate and organic carbon stable isotopes and X-ray fluorescence (XRF)-scanner derived elemental distribution data in combination with planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy indicate complete recovery of the Cenomanian Stage. [...]"

Source: Cretaceous Research
Authors: SebastianBeil et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2017.11.006

Read the full article here.


Showing 1 - 10 of 282 results.
Items per Page 10
of 29