News

Prokaryotic community assembly patterns and nitrogen metabolic potential in oxygen minimum zone of Yangtze Estuary water column

Abstract.

"It is predicted that oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean will expand as a consequence of global warming and environmental pollution. This will affect the overall microbial ecology and microbial nitrogen cycle. As one of the world's largest alluvial estuaries, the Yangtze Estuary has exhibited a seasonal OMZ since the 1980s. In this study, we have uncovered the microbial composition, the patterns of community assembly and the potential for microbial nitrogen cycling within the water column of the Yangtze Estuary, with a particular focus on OMZ. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Yihua Sun et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2024.119011

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Regional Fluctuations in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Late Holocene

Abstract.

"This study presents a high-resolution record of δ15Nsed, which serves as a proxy for water column denitrification and oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) intensity, from the Soledad Basin in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific OMZ. The Soledad Basin δ15Nsed record is compared to the Pescadero Slope and Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) δ15Nsed records to gain insight into regional variations in the ETNP OMZ. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 950–1250 CE), Soledad Basin, Pescadero Slope, and SBB records exhibit coherent trends suggesting that there was general water column oxygenation stability. [...]".

 

Source: MDPI
Authors: Caitlin E. Tems & Eric Tappa
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans5020021

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Prokaryotic community structure and key taxa in the Arabian Sea’s oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Microbial communities within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play crucial roles in the marine biogeochemical cycling. Arabian Sea (AS) has one of the largest OMZs among the global oceans, however, knowledge about the microbial ecology of the AS OMZ remained limited. In the present study, 44 water samples collected from six stations across the AS, spanning from the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layer to 4000m depth were analyzed. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed the structural diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities, influenced primarily by depth and dissolved oxygen (DO) levels. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Ding Li et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1380819

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Emergent constraint on oxygenation of the upper South Eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone in the twenty-first century

Abstract.

"As a consequence of on-going global warming, the ocean is losing oxygen, which has implications not only in terms of marine resources management and food supply but also in terms of the potentially important feedback on the global carbon cycle and climate. Of particular scrutiny are the extended zones of already low levels of oxygen called the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) embedded in the subsurface waters of the productive Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS). These OMZs are currently diversely simulated by state-of-the-art Earth System Models (ESM) hampering a reliable projection of ocean deoxygenation on marine ecosystem services in these regions. [...]".

 

Source: Nature 
Authors: Ivan Almendra et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-024-01427-2

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Expanding oxygen minimum zones in the northern Indian Ocean predicted by hypoxia-related bacteria

Abstract.

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean are areas with dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below critical thresholds that impact marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycling. In the northern Indian Ocean (NIO), OMZs exhibit a tendency to expand in mesopelagic waters and contribute significantly to global nitrogen loss and climate change. However, the microbial drivers of OMZ expansion in the NIO remain understudied. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Jinyan Liu et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1396306

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Copepoda community imprints the continuity of the oceanic and shelf oxygen minimum zones along the west coast of India

Abstract.

"The largest continental shelf Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) in the world is formed along the Indian western shelf in the eastern Arabian Sea during the Southwest Monsoon [(SWM); June–September], which is a natural pollution event associated with the coastal upwelling. This study examines the composition, abundance, and distribution of copepods during the Northeast Monsoon [(NEM); November to February] and SWM in 50 m depth zones along the Indian western shelf in the eastern Arabian Sea. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Vidhya Vijayasenan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2024.106380

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Highly active fish in low oxygen environments: vertical movements and behavioural responses of bigeye and yellowfin tunas to oxygen minimum zones...

Full title: "Highly active fish in low oxygen environments: vertical movements and behavioural responses of bigeye and yellowfin tunas to oxygen minimum zones in the eastern Pacific Ocean"

Abstract.

"Oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean are predicted to significantly increase in volume over the coming decades as a result of anthropogenic climatic warming. The resulting reduction in dissolved oxygen (DO) in the pelagic realm is likely to have detrimental impacts on water-breathing organisms, particularly those with higher metabolic rates, such as billfish, tunas, and sharks. [...]".

 

Source: Springer Nature 
Authors: Nicolas E. Humphries et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-023-04366-2

Read the full article here.


Cold-Water Coral Reefs in the Oxygen Minimum Zones Off West Africa

Abstract.

"The discoveries of large reefs within cold-water coral mound provinces revealed that the West African margin is a coral hotspot area in the Atlantic Ocean. The most striking observation is that cold-water corals thrive in extensive oxygen minimum zones under extreme conditions. This points to a wide tolerance of cold-water corals in these regions to low oxygen concentrations. The coral mound provinces off Mauritania, Angola, and Namibia, which are located in the centre of the local oxygen minimum zones, were selected as key study areas, and their regional oceanographic, bio-ecological, and geo-morphological settings are described in detail. [...]".

 

Source: Springer Nature
Authors: Claudia Wienberg et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-40897-7_8

Read the full article here.


Editorial: Constraining uncertainties in hindcasts and future projections of marine deoxygenation

Abstract.

"Ocean deoxygenation is a key stressor for marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles (Gruber, 2011; Breitburg et al., 2018). Climate projections based on Earth system models (ESMs) suggest that the global oxygen inventory will undergo a significant decline over the next century under persistent greenhouse gas emissions (Bopp et al., 2013; Kwiatkowski et al., 2020). Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) located close to productive eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUSs) and the Arabian Sea may expand or shift in spatial extent dramatically, thereby impacting regional marine habitats (Stramma et al., 2012) and ecosystem services (Lachkar et al., 2023). [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Masahito Shigemitsu et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1355015

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Hypoxia-tolerant zooplankton may reduce biological carbon pump efficiency in the Humboldt current system off Peru

Abstract.

"In the ocean, downward flux of particles produced in sunlit surface waters is the major component of the biological carbon pump, which sequesters atmospheric carbon dioxide and fuels deep-sea ecosystems. The efficiency of downward carbon transfer is expected to be particularly high in tropical upwelling systems where hypoxia occurring beneath the productive surface waters is thought to hamper particle consumption. However, observations of both particle feeders and carbon export in low-oxygen waters are scarce. Here, we provide evidence that hypoxia-tolerant zooplankton feed on sinking particles in the extensive Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) off Peru. [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Anja Engel et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-023-01140-6

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Fossil-Bearing Concretions of the Araripe Basin Accumulated During Oceanic Anoxic Event 1b

Abstract.

"Fossils from the Araripe Basin (northeastern Brazil) are known for their remarkable preservation of vertebrates and invertebrates, even including soft tissues. They occur in carbonate concretions within organic carbon-rich strata assigned to the Romualdo Formation. Here we present integrated stable isotope, elemental and microfossil records from the Sítio Sobradinho outcrop, Araripe Basin, northeastern Brazil. Our results imply that black shales hosting fossil-bearing carbonate concretions within the lower Romualdo Formation were deposited during Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) 1b (Kilian sub-event). [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Marlone H. H. Bom et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023PA004736

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Vertical variation of bacterial production and potential role in oxygen loss in the southern Bay of Bengal

Abstract.

"Marine environments wherein long-term microbial oxygen consumption exceeds oxygen replenishment can be associated with oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). The Bay of Bengal OMZ (BOB-OMZ) is one of the most intense OMZs globally. To assess the contribution of bacterial oxygen consumption to oxygen loss in BOB-OMZ, we measured bacterial production (BP), temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in the whole water column. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Microbiology
Authors: Wenqi Ye et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2023.1250575

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Widespread marine euxinia along the western Yangtze Platform caused by oxygen minimum zone expansion during the Capitanian mass extinction

Abstract.

"The development of widespread marine anoxic and/or euxinic conditions has been proposed as a likely driver of the mid-Capitanian mass extinction. However, the driving mechanisms and spatiotemporal evolution of anoxia/euxinia remain poorly constrained. In order to decipher changes in marine redox conditions and their possible influence on the mid-Capitanian biotic crisis, we applied multiple geochemical indicators to three sections across a shelf-to-basin transect in the Middle Permian Kuhfeng and Lower Yinping formations of the Lower Yangtze Basin, South China. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Bolin Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104273

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Dynamical Response of the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone to the Extreme Indian Ocean Dipole Events in 2016 and 2019

Abstract.

"The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) plays a crucial role in shaping local and global environments, yet its effects on interannual variability of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (ASOMZ) remains poorly understood. Here, we used a coupled physical-biogeochemical model to investigate the dynamical response of the ASOMZ to extreme negative (2016) and positive (2019) IOD events. Our findings revealed that the suboxic area of the ASOMZ reduced (expanded) by ∼27% (∼28%) after the negative (positive) IOD event. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Zhiwei Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023GL104226

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Evolution and dynamics of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: Understanding the paradoxes

Abstract.

"The Arabian Sea hosts a perennial and intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at 150–1200 m depths with O2 concentrations <0.5 ml/l. It is generally believed that the oxygen-depleted conditions at mid-water depths result from high rate of O2 consumption due to monsoon-driven productivity generating a high organic matter flux, combined with slow renewal of thermocline waters in the region. With global warming and increasing hypoxia, there is growing interest to better understand the various factors controlling oxygen conditions in the thermocline waters and the impact on the nutrient cycling and climate. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Arun Deo Singh et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eve.2023.100028

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Effect of an Open Central American Seaway on Ocean Circulation and the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Tropical Pacific From Model Simulations

Abstract.

"The tectonic closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) during the mid-Miocene to mid-Pliocene (∼16–3 Ma BP) is thought of as a key interval for the onset of the present-day tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). In this study we investigate the impact of an open CAS on the ocean circulation and the OMZ in the tropical Pacific. We perform a series of sensitivity experiments with the Kiel Climate Model, where we vary the CAS sill depth from shallow to deep. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Vyacheslav Khon et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023GL103728

Read the full article here.


Editorial: Recent developments in oxygen minimum zones biogeochemistry

Abstract.

"Marine Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) modulate biogeochemical cycles, and directly impact climate dynamics by influencing air-sea fluxes of the potent greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide (Levin, 2018). OMZs are formed in regions of weak oxygen (O2) supply from physical ventilation and high integrated microbial O2 demand fueled by downward organic flux from overlying surface waters. The ocean’s major OMZs are found in the Eastern Tropical South and North Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal in the Indian Ocean (Karstensen et al., 2008; Stramma et al., 2008). [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Annie Bourbonnais et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1333731

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On the Origins of Open Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract.

"Recent work suggests that Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are sustained by the supply of oxygen-poor waters rather than the export of organic matter from the local surface layer and its subsequent remineralization inside OMZs. However, the mechanisms that form and maintain OMZs are not well constrained, such as the origin of the oxygen that oxygenates OMZs, and the locations where oxygen consumption occurs. Here we use an observation-based transport matrix to determine the origins of open ocean OMZs in terms of (a) OMZ volume, (b) oxygen that survives remineralization and oxygenates OMZs, and (c) oxygen utilization in the interior ocean that contributes to the oxygen-deficit of OMZs. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Xabier Davila et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023JC019677

Read the full article here.

 


Widespread marine euxinia along the western Yangtze Platform caused by oxygen minimum zone expansion during the Capitanian mass extinction

Abstract.

"The development of widespread marine anoxic and/or euxinic conditions has been proposed as a likely driver of the mid-Capitanian mass extinction. However, the driving mechanisms and spatiotemporal evolution of anoxia/euxinia remain poorly constrained. In order to decipher changes in marine redox conditions and their possible influence on the mid-Capitanian biotic crisis, we applied multiple geochemical indicators to three sections across a shelf-to-basin transect in the Middle Permian Kuhfeng and Lower Yinping formations of the Lower Yangtze Basin, South China. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Bolin Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104273

Read the full article here.


Preprint: Unique ocean circulation pathways reshape the Indian Ocean oxygen minimum zone with warming

Abstract.

"The global ocean is losing oxygen with warming. Observations and Earth system model projections suggest, however, that this global ocean deoxygenation does not equate to a simple and systematic expansion of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Previous studies have focused on the Pacific Ocean; they showed that the outer OMZ deoxygenates and expands as oxygen supply by advective transport weakens, the OMZ core oxygenates and contracts due to a shift in the composition of the source waters supplied by slow mixing, and in between these two regimes, oxygen is redistributed with little effect on OMZ volume. [...]".

 

Source: EGUsphere 
Authors: Sam Ditkovsky et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2023-1082

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Extensive Accumulation of Nitrous Oxide in the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Bay of Bengal

Abstract.

"The production by microorganisms of nitrous oxide (N2O), a trace gas contributing to global warming and stratospheric ozone depletion, is enhanced around the oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). The production constitutes an important source of atmospheric N2O. Although an OMZ is found in the northern part of the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal (BoB), two earlier studies conducted during the later phase of winter monsoon (February) and spring intermonsoon (March–April) found quite different magnitudes of N2O accumulation. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Sakae Toyoda et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022GB007689

Read the full article here.


A compendium of bacterial and archaeal single-cell amplified genomes from oxygen deficient marine waters

Abstract.

"Oxygen-deficient marine waters referred to as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) or anoxic marine zones (AMZs) are common oceanographic features. They host both cosmopolitan and endemic microorganisms adapted to low oxygen conditions. Microbial metabolic interactions within OMZs and AMZs drive coupled biogeochemical cycles resulting in nitrogen loss and climate active trace gas production and consumption. Global warming is causing oxygen-deficient waters to expand and intensify. [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Julia Anstett et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-023-02222-y

Read the full article here.


Do phytoplankton require oxygen to survive? A hypothesis and model synthesis from oxygen minimum zones

Abstract. 

"It is commonly known that phytoplankton have a pivotal role in marine biogeochemistry and ecosystems as carbon fixers and oxygen producers, but their response to deoxygenation has scarcely been studied. Nonetheless, in the major oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), all surface phytoplankton groups, regardless of size, disappear and are replaced by unique cyanobacteria lineages below the oxycline. To develop reasonable hypotheses to explain this pattern, we conduct a review of available information on OMZ phytoplankton, and we re-analyze previously published data (flow cytometric and hydrographic) [...]". 

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Jane C. Y. Wong et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.12367

Read the full article here.


Nitrite Oxidation Across the Full Oxygen Spectrum in the Ocean

Abstract. 

"Fixed nitrogen limits primary productivity in most areas of the surface ocean. Nitrite oxidation is the main source of nitrate, the most abundant form of inorganic fixed nitrogen. Even though known as an aerobic process, nitrite oxidation is not always stimulated by increased oxygen concentration, and nitrite oxidation occurs in layers of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) where oxygen is not detectable. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, known since their original isolation as aerobes, were also detected in these layers. Whether and how nitrite oxidation is occurring in the anoxic seawater is debated. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library 
Authors: Xin Sun et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022GB007548

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Prokaryotic community dynamics and nitrogen-cycling genes in an oxygen-deficient upwelling system during La Niña and El Niño conditions

Abstract. 

"Dissolved oxygen regulates microbial distribution and nitrogen cycling and, therefore, ocean productivity and Earth's climate. To date, the assembly of microbial communities in relation to oceanographic changes due to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) remains poorly understood in oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). The Mexican Pacific upwelling system supports high productivity and a permanent OMZ. Here, the spatiotemporal distribution of the prokaryotic community and nitrogen-cycling genes was investigated along a repeated transect subjected to varying oceanographic conditions associated with La Niña in 2018 and El Niño in 2019. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library 
Authors: Silvia Pajares et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.16362

Read the full article here.


The effects of seawater thermodynamic parameters on the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the tropical western Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"The continuous expansion of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a microcosm of marine hypoxia problem. Based on a survey in M4 seamount area of Tropical Western Pacific Ocean, the effects of thermodynamic parameters on OMZ were discussed. The study showed thermodynamic parameters mainly affect the upper oxycline of OMZ. The increase in temperature aggravates seawater stratification, which not only shallows oxycline but also increases the strength of DO stratification, promoting the expansion of OMZ. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Jun Ma et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114579

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Otoliths of marine fishes record evidence of low oxygen, temperature and pH conditions of deep Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract.

"The deep-sea is rapidly losing oxygen, with profound implications for marine organisms. Within Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, such as the California and the Benguela Current Ecosystems, an important question is how the ongoing expansion, intensification and shoaling of Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) will affect deep-sea fishes throughout their lifetimes. One of the first steps to filling this knowledge gap is through the development of tools and techniques to track fishes’ exposure to hypoxic (<45 μmol kg-1), low-temperature (∼4–10°C) and low-pH (∼7.5) waters when inhabiting OMZs. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Leticia Maria Cavole et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2022.103941

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Intermediate water circulation drives distribution of Pliocene Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract. 

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a critical role in global biogeochemical cycling and act as barriers to dispersal for marine organisms. OMZs are currently expanding and intensifying with climate change, however past distributions of OMZs are relatively unknown. Here we present evidence for widespread pelagic OMZs during the Pliocene (5.3-2.6 Ma), the most recent epoch with atmospheric CO2 analogous to modern (~400-450 ppm). The global distribution of OMZ-affiliated planktic foraminifer, Globorotaloides hexagonus, and Earth System and Species Distribution Models show [...]". 

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Catherine V. Davis et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-35083-x

Read the full article here. 


The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone was similar in extent but weaker during the Last Glacial Maximum than Late Holocene

Abstract. 

"Quantifying past oxygen concentrations in oceans is crucial to improving understanding of current global ocean deoxygenation. Here, we use a record of pore density of the epibenthic foraminifer Planulina limbata from the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone to reconstruct oxygen concentrations in bottom waters from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Late Holocene at 17.5°S about 500 meters below the sea surface. We found that oxygen levels were 40% lower during the Last Glacial Maximum than during the Late Holocene (about 6.7 versus 11.1 µmol/kg, respectively). [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Nicolaas Glock et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00635-y 

Read the full article here.


Diverging Fates of the Pacific Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone and Its Core in a Warming World

Abstract. 

"Global ocean oxygen loss is projected to persist in the future, but Earth system models (ESMs) have not yet provided a consistent picture of how it will influence the largest oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the tropical Pacific. We examine the change in the Pacific OMZ volume in an ensemble of ESMs from the CMIP6 archive, considering a broad range of oxygen (O2) thresholds relevant to biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems (5–160 µmol/kg). Despite OMZ biases in the historical period of the simulations, the ESM ensemble projections consistently fall into three regimes across ESMs […]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Julius J.M. Busecke et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2021AV000470

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Investigating ocean deoxygenation and the oxygen minimum zone in the Central Indo Pacific region based on the hindcast datasets

Abstract. 

"Deoxygenation is increasingly recognized as a significant environmental threat to the ocean following sea temperature rises due to global warming and climate change. Considering the cruciality of the deoxygenation impacts, it is important to assess the current status and predict the future possibility of ocean deoxygenation, for instance, within the Central Indo Pacific (CIP) regions represent climate-regulated marine areas. This study divided CIP into five regions then investigated the deoxygenation parameters (dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, and pH) collected from 1993 to 2021 sourced from in situ measurement and long-term hindcast data. [...]".

 

Source: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Authors: Karlina Triana et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-022-10615-6

Read the full article here.


Physical-chemical factors influencing the vertical distribution of phototrophic pico-nanoplankton in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) off Northern Chile

Abstract. 

"The vertical distribution of phytoplankton is of fundamental importance in the structure, dynamic, and biogeochemical pathways in marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, what are the main factors determining this distribution remains as an open question. Here, we evaluated the relative influence of environmental factors that might control the coexistence and vertical distribution of pico-nanoplankton associated with the OMZ off northern Chile. Our results showed that in the upper layer Synechococcus-like cells were numerically important at all sampling stations. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edson Piscoya et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2022.105710

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Variability of the oxygen minimum zone associated with primary productivity and hydrographic conditions in the Eastern North Pacific

Abstract. 

"The expansion of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) associated with global warming has generated interest in its variability during the last two millennia. Several oceanographic mechanisms, as advection of dissolved oxygen and depletion of dissolved oxygen by oxidation of exported marine productivity, could explain the variability of δ15N in organic matter as a denitrification indicator of the water column in the Pacific Ocean. Our objective was to infer local or remote forcing mechanisms that lead to the strengthening or weakening of the OMZ in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Alberto Sánchez et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2022.103810

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Mercury stable isotopes suggest reduced foraging depth in oxygen minimum zones for blue sharks

Abstract. 

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are currently expanding across the global ocean due to climate change, leading to a compression of usable habitat for several marine species. Mercury stable isotope compositions provide a spatially and temporally integrated view of marine predator foraging habitat and its variability with environmental conditions. Here, we analyzed mercury isotopes in blue sharks Prionace glauca from normoxic waters in the northeastern Atlantic and from the world's largest and shallowest OMZ, located in the northeastern Pacific (NEP). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Gaël Le Croizier et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2022.113892

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Oxygen minimum zone copepods in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal: Their adaptations and status

Abstract.

"The Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal are cul-de-sacs of the northern Indian Ocean, and they contain more than half of the world's Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs). The current study reviews the vast and advancing literature on the oceanographic settings that lead to distinct OMZs in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal and links them with the copepods thriving there, their status, and likely adaptations. The Arabian Sea has a thicker perennial subsurface OMZ (∼1000 m) than the Bay of Bengal (∼500 m), which is linked to high plankton production via upwelling and winter convection in the former and river influx and mesoscale eddies in the latter. [...]."

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Vidhya Vijayasenan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2022.102839

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Spatio-temporal variations in culturable bacterial community associated with denitrification in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

Abstract. 

"The Arabian Sea (AS) oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a site of intense denitrification, contributing to 20% of the global oceanic denitrification, playing a significant role in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, the structure and diversity of culturable bacterial communities inhabiting the water column of the AS OMZ were investigated through phylogenetic analysis and nitrate-utilizing ability was studied through culture-based studies. A total of 248 isolates collected during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon season were analysed for 16S rRNA gene sequences. [...]".

 

Source: Marine Biology Research
Authors: Ujwala Amberkar et al. 
DOI: 10.1080/17451000.2022.2086700

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Deglacial restructuring of the Eastern equatorial Pacific oxygen minimum zone

Abstract. 

"Oxygenation in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific is responsive to ongoing climate change in the modern ocean, although whether the region saw a deglacial change in extent or position of the Oxygen Minimum Zone remains poorly constrained. Here, stable isotopes from the shells of an Oxygen Minimum Zone-dwelling planktic foraminifer are used to reassess the position of the mid-water Oxygen Minimum Zone relative to both the thermocline and benthos. Oxygen isotopes record a rapid shoaling of the Oxygen Minimum Zone towards the thermocline associated with Heinrich Stadial 1 and persisting through the deglaciation. [...]". 

 

Source: Communications Earth & Environment
Authors: Catherine V. Davis
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00477-8

Read the full article here.


Insights into prokaryotic community and its potential functions in nitrogen metabolism in the Bay of Bengal, a pronounced Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract. 

"Ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) around the global ocean are expanding both horizontally and vertically. Multiple studies have identified the significant influence of anoxic conditions (≤1 μM O2) on marine prokaryotic communities and biogeochemical cycling of elements. However, little attention has been paid to the expanding low-oxygen zones where the oxygen level is still above the anoxic level. Here, we studied the abundance and taxonomic and functional profiles of prokaryotic communities in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), where the oxygen concentration is barely above suboxic level (5 μM O2). [...]". 

 

Source: Microbiology Spectrum
Authors: Bowei Gu et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.00892-21

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Ostracod response to monsoon and OMZ variability over the past 1.2 Myr

Abstract. 

"We present the first continuous middle through late Pleistocene record of fossil ostracods from the Maldives in the northern Indian Ocean, derived from sediment cores taken at Site U1467 by Expedition 359 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). Site U1467 lies at 487 m water depth in the Inner Sea of the Maldives archipelago, an ideal place for studying the effects of the South Asian Monsoon (SAM) system on primary productivity, intermediate depth ocean circulation, and the regional oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Carlos A. Alvarez Zarikian et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marmicro.2022.102105

Read the full article here.


Trace elements V, Ni, Mo and U: A geochemical tool to quantify dissolved oxygen concentration in the oxygen minimum zone of the north-eastern Pacific

Abstract.

"Deoxygenation of the water column in the oceans and in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) has become relevant due to its connection with global climate change. The variability of the OMZ has been inferred by in situ measurements for the last 70 years and qualitatively assessed through the monitoring of trace elements and the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) of organic matter on several time scales. The V, Ni, Mo and U concentrations in surface sediments and the dissolved oxygen concentration in the water column of La Paz Bay and the Mazatlán margin were used to propose an exponential regression model. This model will allow the inference of the dissolved oxygen concentration in the sedimentary records from the Alfonso Basin in La Paz Bay and in the Mazatlán margin over the last 250 years. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Alberto Sánchez et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2022.103732

Read the full article here.


Geochemistry of sediments in contact with oxygen minimum zone of the eastern Arabian Sea: Proxy for palaeo-studies

Abstract. 

"The Arabian Sea encompasses oxygen minimum zone with denitrifying conditions. For the present study, sediments were collected across three transects off Goa transect (GT), Mangalore transect (MT) and Kochi transect (KT) in contact with water column dissolved oxygen (DO) range of 1.4–118.0 µM. Sediments were investigated for texture, clay mineralogy, total organic carbon (Corg), total nitrogen, CaCO3, δ15N, δ13C, metal content to infer their distribution with changing DO and their use as possible palaeo-proxies. The Corg (0.9–8.6%) is largely marine and δ15N from GT and MT preserves signatures of higher water column denitrification. [...]". 

 

Source: Journal of Earth System Science 

Authors: Pratima M. Kessarkar et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12040-022-01823-2 

Read the full article here.


Anaerobic methane oxidation in a coastal oxygen minimum zone: spatial and temporal dynamics

Abstract. 

"Coastal waters are a major source of marine methane to the atmosphere. Particularly high concentrations of this potent greenhouse gas are found in anoxic waters, but it remains unclear if and to what extent anaerobic methanotrophs mitigate the methane flux. Here we investigate the long-term dynamics in methanotrophic activity and the methanotroph community in the coastal oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, combining biogeochemical analyses, experimental incubations and 16S rRNA gene sequencing over 3 consecutive years. [...]".

 

Source: Environmental Microbiology

Authors: Herdís G. R. Steinsdóttir et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.16003

Read the full article here.


Temperature and oxygen supply shape the demersal community in a tropical Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract. 

"The organisms that inhabit Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) have specialized adaptations that allow them to survive within a very narrow range of environmental conditions. Consequently, even small environmental perturbations can result in local species distribution shifts that alter ecosystem trophodynamics. Here, we examined the effect of changing sea water temperatures and oxygen levels on the physiological performance and metabolic traits of the species forming marine demersal communities along the OMZ margins in the Costa Rican Pacific. The strong temperature and oxygen gradients along this OMZ margin provide a “natural experiment” to explore the effects of warming and hypoxia on marine demersal communities. [...]".

 

Source: Environmental Biology of Fishes

Authors: Tayler M. Clarke et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10641-022-01256-2

Read the full article here.


Mid-Holocene intensification of the oxygen minimum zone in the northeastern Arabian Sea

Abstract. 

"The Arabian Sea is characterized by a strong Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) bearing sub-oxic conditions at the intermediate water depth. We analyzed a sediment core near the upper margin of OMZ (174 m water depth) from offshore Saurashtra, northeastern (NE) Arabian Sea to reconstruct multi-proxy biogeochemical response in the area during the Early-Middle Holocene (∼10–4 ka before present). The results indicate lower foraminiferal productivity (both benthic and planktic) and weak sub-surface denitrification causing mild OMZ conditions at the study site during the early Holocene (∼10–8 ka). Subsequently, an increased foraminiferal productivity and sub-surface (both the water column and sediment) denitrification in the area led to intensified OMZ conditions during the mid-Holocene (after ∼8 ka). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Syed Azharuddin et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jseaes.2022.105094

Read the full article here.


Observed denitrification in the northeast Arabian Sea during the winter-spring transition of 2009

Abstract. 

"The central and northeast Arabian Sea (AS) has an intense and thick oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and denitrification zone. It is comparable with the strongest OMZ of the north-equatorial Pacific Ocean. Denitrification in the AS is revisited using a set of cruise observations collected during February–March of 2009 by the Centre for Marine Living Resources, India. The region possesses one of the most robust N* depleted water reaching as low as -20 μmol l−1 at depths (~600 m). In AS, the oxygen depletion is mainly due to sluggish circulation, weak lateral and vertical ventilation. The biological respiration in oxygen deficit condition depletes nitrate and further modifies the Redfield ratio at intermediate depths (200-600 m) from 16N:1P to 8N:1P. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Anju Mallissery et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2021.103680

Read the full article here.


Oxygen gradients shape the unique structure of picoeukaryotic communities in the Bay of Bengal

Abstract. 

"Picoeukaryotic communities respond rapidly to global climate change and play an important role in marine biological food webs and ecosystems. The formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) is facilitated by the stratification of seawater and higher primary production in the surface layer, and the marine picoeukaryotic community this low-oxygen environment is topic of interest. To better understand the picoeukaryotic community assembly mechanisms in an OMZ, we collected samples from the Bay of Bengal (BOB) in October and November 2020 and used 18S rDNA to study the picoeukaryotic communities and their community assembly mechanisms that they are controlled by in deep-sea and hypoxic zones. The results show that deterministic and stochastic processes combine to shape picoeukaryotic communities in the BOB. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Zhuo Chen et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.152862

Read the full article here.


Sensitivity of asymmetric oxygen minimum zones to mixing intensity and stoichiometry in the tropical Pacific using a basin-scale model

Abstract.

"The tropical Pacific Ocean holds the two largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the world's oceans, showing a prominent hemispheric asymmetry, with a much stronger and broader OMZ north of the Equator. However, many models have difficulties in reproducing the observed asymmetric OMZs in the tropical Pacific. Here, we apply a fully coupled basin-scale model to evaluate the impacts of stoichiometry and the intensity of vertical mixing on the dynamics of OMZs in the tropical Pacific. We first utilize observational data of dissolved oxygen (DO) to calibrate and validate the basin-scale model. Our model experiments demonstrate that enhanced vertical mixing combined with a reduced O:C utilization ratio can significantly improve our model capability of reproducing the asymmetric OMZs. Our study shows that DO concentration is more sensitive to biological processes over 200–400 m but to physical processes below 400 m. [...]".

 

Source: Geoscientific Model Development 

Authors: Kai Wang et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-15-1017-2022 

Read the full article here.


Responses of Horizontally Expanding Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones to Climate Change Based on Observations

Abstract.

"Due to climate change, global oceanic dissolved oxygen (DO) has been decreasing, and oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have been expanding. Here, we estimate the annual global and regional OMZ areas using geostatistical regression combined with Monte Carlo. From 1960 to 2019, annual global OMZ20 (DO < 20 μmol/kg) and OMZ60 (DO < 60 μmol/kg) areas cover 5%–14% and 15%–32% of the global ocean, respectively. The global and most regional OMZ areas after the late 2000s were all significantly larger than those in previous years. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library 

Authors: Yuntao Zhou et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022GL097724

Read the full article here.


Distribution and biomass of gelatinous zooplankton in relation to an oxygen minimum zone and a shallow seamount in the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic

Abstract.

"Physical and topographic characteristics can structure pelagic habitats and affect the plankton community composition. For example, oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are expected to lead to a habitat compression for species with a high oxygen demand, while upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water at seamounts can locally increase productivity, especially in oligotrophic oceanic waters. Here we investigate the response of the gelatinous zooplankton (GZ) assemblage and biomass to differing oxygen conditions and to a seamount in the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) around the Cape Verde archipelago. [...]."

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Florian Lüskow et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2022.105566

Read the full article here. 


Biogeochemical feedbacks may amplify ongoing and future ocean deoxygenation: a case study from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"A new box model is employed to simulate the oxygen-dependent cycling of nutrients in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Model results and data for the present state of the OMZ indicate that dissolved iron is the limiting nutrient for primary production and is provided by the release of dissolved ferrous iron from shelf and slope sediments. Most of the removal of reactive nitrogen occurs by anaerobic oxidation of ammonium where ammonium is delivered by aerobic organic nitrogen degradation. Model experiments simulating the effects of ocean deoxygenation and warming show that the productivity of the Peruvian OMZ will increase due to the enhanced release of dissolved iron from shelf and slope sediments. A positive feedback loop rooted in the oxygen-dependent benthic iron release amplifies, both, the productivity rise and oxygen decline in ambient bottom waters. [...]". 

 

Source: Biogeochemistry

Authors: Klaus Wallmann et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-022-00908-w 

Read the full article here.


Oxygen minimum zone along the eastern Arabian Sea: Intra-annual variation and dynamics based on ship-borne studies

Abstract.

"The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS, ∼6° to 21°N), within Indian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), is mapped, for the first time, for one year through ten repeated ship-based observations between December 2017 and January 2019 at seven to ten stations along the 2000 m depth contour. On an annual basis, the OMZ (<20 µM oxygen) in the EAS varied between 60 and 1350 m; its thickness decreased from north to south. During the winter monsoon, the upper boundary of the OMZ in the north and south was deeper (150–160 m) than the central EAS (∼110 m). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Sudheesh Valliyodan et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2022.102742

Read the full article here.


Chapter 13 - The crucial contribution of mixing to present and future ocean oxygen distribution

Abstract.

"The oxygen content of the ocean interior largely results from a balance between respiration and advective ventilation, with only a small contribution from mixing processes. However, two important characteristics, which are key to future oxygen distribution in the ocean, primarily depend on the strength of ocean mixing. The first relates to the oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), which are wide O2-deficient mesopelagic layers inhospitable to most marine macro-fauna. We illustrate how mixing intensity controls the volume[...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Marina Lévy et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-821512-8.00020-7

Read the full article here.


Recent Developments in Oxygen Minimum Zones Biogeochemistry

New Research Topic: Recent Developments in Oxygen Minimum Zones Biogeochemistry

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a key role in carbon, nitrogen and other elemental cycles, and directly impact climate dynamics by influencing air-sea fluxes of the potent greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. Oxygen concentrations, catalyze specialized micro-organisms to regulate chemical fluxes, which are critical for ecosystem functioning. The degree of deoxygenation in the OMZs vary from hypoxic in the tropical Atlantic Ocean to functionally anoxic in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the northern Indian Ocean.[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Read articles here.

 


Oxygen loss in fjords, coastal areas, and open ocean systems

Abstract.

"Loss of oxygen and expansion of oxygen depleted environments have been witnessed in both coastal and open-ocean systems since the middle of the 20th century, and ocean modelling predicts continuing decease by the year 2100. Oxygen depletion occurs thus during the same time epoch as global warming. Increased knowledge on how and why oxygen varies in space and time shapes the biogeochemical and ecological structure of marine systems and will be needed for future predictions of marine productivity. In coastal systems deoxygenation is also linked to human activities that lead to increased loadings of nutrients and organic matter, and to regional effects of climate induced changes in wind and precipitation patterns[...]"

 

Source: BJERKNES CENTRE
Authors: Anne Gro Vea Salvanes et al.
 

Read the full article here.


Low oxygen levels can help to prevent the detrimental effect of acute warming on mitochondrial efficiency in fish

Abstract.

"Aerobic metabolism of aquatic ectotherms is highly sensitive to fluctuating climates. Many mitochondrial traits exhibit phenotypic plasticity in response to acute variations in temperature and oxygen availability. These responses are critical for understanding the effects of environmental variations on aquatic ectotherms' performance. Using the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, we determined the effects of acute warming and deoxygenation in vitro on mitochondrial respiratory capacities and mitochondrial[...]"

 

Source: The Royal Society Publishing 
Authors: Elisa Thoral et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0759

Read the full article here.


System controls of coastal and open ocean oxygen depletion

Abstract.

"The epoch of the Anthropocene, a period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment, has witnessed a decline in oxygen concentrations and an expansion of oxygen-depleted environments in both coastal and open ocean systems since the middle of the 20th century. This paper provides a review of system-specific drivers of low oxygen in a range of case studies representing marine systems in the open ocean, on continental shelves, in enclosed seas[...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Grant C. Pitcher
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2021.102613

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Increase of a hypoxia-tolerant fish, Harpadon nehereus (Synodontidae), as a result of ocean deoxygenation off southwestern China

Abstract.

"We report a sudden explosive rise in abundance off southeastern China of a fish species that is hypoxia-tolerant, Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus, Family Synodontidae), belonging to an Order (the Aulopiformes) encompassing overwhelmingly deep-sea fishes, but which predominantly occurs in coastal water. We suggest that this is made possible by the very high water content of its muscle and other tissues (about 90%, vs 75–80% for other coastal fish), which reduces its oxygen requirements and allows it to outcompete other fish in low-oxygen[...]"

 

Source: Environmental Biology of Fishes
Authors: Bin Kang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10641-021-01130-7

Read the full article here.


Deoxygenation in Marginal Seas of the Indian Ocean

Abstract.

"This article describes oxygen distributions and recent deoxygenation trends in three marginal seas – Persian Gulf and Red Sea in the Northwestern Indian Ocean (NWIO) and Andaman Sea in the Northeastern Indian Ocean (NEIO). Vertically mixed water column in the shallow Persian Gulf is generally well-oxygenated, especially in winter. Biogeochemistry and ecosystems of Persian Gulf are being subjected to enormous anthropogenic stresses including large loading of nutrients and organic matter, enhancing oxygen demand and causing hypoxia (oxygen < 1.4 ml l–1) in central and southern Gulf in summer. The larger and deeper Red Sea is relatively less affected by human[...]"

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: S. Wajih A. Naqvi
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.624322


Temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration in the Pacific Ocean at the northern region of the oxygen minimum zone off Mexico between the last two

Abstract.

"The changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration in the Pacific Ocean in the northern region of the shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Mexico were analyzed on the basis of the Word Ocean Database and a series of oceanographic cruises (LEGOZ-Mex). In order to test the changes in both parameters between two similar oceanographic scenarios according to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), a comparison was made between the last two cool PDO phases of 1962–1974 and 2002–2012 when conditions[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: E.D.Sánchez-Pérez et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2021.103607

Read the full article here.


Biogeochemistry and hydrography shape microbial community assembly and activity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycles due to extensive microbial activity. How OMZ microbial communities assemble and respond to environmental variation is therefore essential to understanding OMZ functioning and ocean biogeochemistry. Sampling along depth profiles at five stations in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP), we captured systematic variations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and associated variables (nitrite, chlorophyll, and ammonium) with depth and between stations. We quantitatively analysed relationships[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library 
Authors: J. Michael Beman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15215

Read the full article here.


Coastal eutrophication drives acidification, oxygen loss, and ecosystem change in a major oceanic upwelling system

Abstract.

"Global change is leading to warming, acidification, and oxygen loss in the ocean. In the Southern California Bight, an eastern boundary upwelling system, these stressors are exacerbated by the localized discharge of anthropogenically enhanced nutrients from a coastal population of 23 million people. Here, we use simulations with a high-resolution, physical–biogeochemical model to quantify the link between terrestrial [...]"

 

Source: PNAS- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Faycal Kessouri et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018856118

Read the full article here.

 


Dissolved Organic Matter in the Upwelling System off Peru: Imprints of Bacterial Activity and Water Mass Characteristics

Abstract.

"Microbial degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) contributes to the formation and preservation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean, but information on the spatial distribution and molecular composition of DOM in OMZ regions is scarce. We quantified molecular components of DOM that is, dissolved amino acids (DAA) and dissolved combined carbohydrates (DCCHO), in the upwelling region off Peru. We found the highest concentrations of DCCHO in fully oxygenated[...]"

 

Source: Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: Anja Engel et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JG006048

Read the full article here.


Vertical distribution of planktic foraminifera through an oxygen minimum zone: how assemblages and test morphology reflect oxygen concentrations

Abstract.

"Oxygen-depleted regions of the global ocean are rapidly expanding, with important implications for global biogeochemical cycles. However, our ability to make projections about the future of oxygen in the ocean is limited by a lack of empirical data with which to test and constrain the behavior of global climatic and oceanographic models. We use depth-stratified plankton tows to demonstrate that some species of planktic foraminifera are adapted to life in the heart of the pelagic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). In particular, we identify two species, Globorotaloides hexagonus and Hastigerina parapelagica, living within the eastern tropical North Pacific OMZ. The tests of the former are preserved in marine sediments and could be used to trace the extent and intensity of low-oxygen pelagic habitats in the fossil record. Additional morphometric analyses of G. hexagonus show that tests found in the lowest oxygen[...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Catherine V. Davis et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-977-2021

Read the full article here.


Microbial niche differentiation explains nitrite oxidation in marine oxygen minimum zones

Abstract.

"Nitrite is a pivotal component of the marine nitrogen cycle. The fate of nitrite determines the loss or retention of fixed nitrogen, an essential nutrient for all organisms. Loss occurs via anaerobic nitrite reduction to gases during denitrification and anammox, while retention occurs via nitrite oxidation to nitrate. Nitrite oxidation is usually represented in biogeochemical models by one kinetic parameter and one oxygen threshold, below which nitrite oxidation is set to zero. Here we find that the responses of nitrite oxidation[...]"

Source: Nature
Authors: Xin Sun et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-020-00852-3

Read the full article here.


Limited iodate reduction in shipboard seawater incubations from the Eastern Tropical North Pacific oxygen deficient zone

Abstract.

"The relative abundance of the inorganic iodine species, iodide and iodate, are applied to characterize both modern and ancient marine oxygen deficient zones (ODZs). However, the rates and mechanisms responsible for in situ iodine redox transformations are poorly characterized, rendering iodine-based redox reconstructions uncertain. Here, we provide constraints on the rates and mechanisms of iodate reduction in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) offshore ODZ using a shipboard tracer–incubation method. Observations of iodate reduction from incubations[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: D.S. Hardisty et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2020.116676

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In situ observations show vertical community structure of pelagic fauna in the eastern tropical North Atlantic off Cape Verde

Abstract.

"Distribution patterns of fragile gelatinous fauna in the open ocean remain scarcely documented. Using epi-and mesopelagic video transects in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which features a mild but intensifying midwater oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), we established one of the first regional observations of diversity and abundance of large gelatinous zooplankton. We quantified the day and night vertical distribution of 46 taxa in relation to environmental conditions. While distribution may be driven by multiple factors, abundance peaks of individual taxa were observed in the OMZ[...]"

 

Source: Nature Scientific Reports
Authors: H. J. T. Hoving et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-78255-9

Read the full article here.


Reviews and syntheses: Present, past, and future of the oxygen minimum zone in the northern Indian Ocean

Abstract.

"Decreasing concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the ocean are  fuconsidered one of the main threats to marine ecosystems as they jeopardize the growth of higher organisms. They also alter the marine nitrogen cycle, which is strongly bound to the carbon cycle and climate. While higher organisms in general start to suffer from oxygen concentrations < ∼ 63 µM (hypoxia), the marine nitrogen cycle responds to oxygen concentration below a threshold of about 20 µM (microbial hypoxia), whereas anoxic processes dominate the nitrogen cycle at oxygen concentrations of < ∼ 0.05 µM (functional anoxia). The Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal are home to approximately 21 % of the total volume of ocean waters revealing microbial hypoxia. While in the Arabian Sea this oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is also functionally anoxic[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences 
Authors:  Tim Rixen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-6051-2020

Read the full article here.


Diversity and distribution of nitrogen fixation genes in the oxygen minimum zones of the world oceans

Abstract.

"Diversity and community composition of nitrogen (N) fixing microbes in the three main oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the world ocean were investigated using operational taxonomic unit (OTU) analysis of nifH clone libraries. Representatives of three of the four main clusters of nifH genes were detected. Cluster I sequences were most diverse in the surface waters, and the most abundant OTUs were affiliated with Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria. Cluster II, III, and IV assemblages were most diverse at oxygen-depleted depths, and none of the sequences were closely related to sequences from cultivated organisms. The OTUs were biogeographically distinct for the most part – there was little overlap among regions, between depths, or between cDNA and DNA. In this study of all three OMZ regions, as well as from the few other published reports from individual OMZ sites, the dominance of a few OTUs was[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Amal Jayakumar et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-5953-2020, 2020

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Oceanographic processes control dissolved oxygen variability at a commercial Atlantic salmon farm: Application of a real-time sensor network

Abstract.

"Open ocean fish farming involves containment of cultured animals under environmental conditions influenced by seasonal variation and water quality. Recently, an important area of research focus has been on water quality monitoring to improve aquaculture management. The development of novel sensors that report in real-time is critical to improve the monitoring capacity of farms, while increasing the understanding of the dynamics of environmental variables. In this study, commercially available, real-time dissolved oxygen and temperature sensors were distributed in the center of 19 cages at a commercial[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Meredith Burke et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.736143

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Imprint of Trace Dissolved Oxygen on Prokaryoplankton Community Structure in an Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"The Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) is a large, persistent, and intensifying oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) that accounts for almost half of the total area of global OMZs. Within the OMZ core (∼350–700 m depth), dissolved oxygen is typically near or below the analytical detection limit of modern sensors (∼10 nM). Steep oxygen gradients above and below the OMZ core lead to vertical structuring of microbial communities that also vary between particle-associated (PA) and free-living (FL) size fractions. Here, we use 16S amplicon sequencing (iTags) to analyze the[...]"

Source: Frotiers in the Marine Science
Authors: Luis Medina Faull et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.00360

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Enhanced Organic Carbon Burial in Sediments of Oxygen Minimum Zones Upon Ocean Deoxygenation

Abstract.

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean are expanding. This expansion is attributed to global warming and may continue over the next 10 to 100 kyrs due to multiple climate CO2-driven factors. The expansion of oxygen-deficient waters has the potential to enhance organic carbon burial in marine sediments, thereby providing a negative feedback on global warming. Here, we study the response of dissolved oxygen in the ocean to increased phosphorus and iron inputs due to CO2-driven enhanced weathering and increased dust emissions, respectively. We use an ocean biogeochemical model[...]"

Source: frontiers in the Marine Science
Authors: Itzel Ruvalcaba Baroni et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00839

Read the full article here.


Chromium reduction and associated stable isotope fractionation restricted to anoxic shelf waters in the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"The marine chromium (Cr) cycle is still insufficiently understood, in particular the mechanisms modulating the spatial distribution of dissolved stable Cr isotopes in seawater. Redox transformations between its main oxidation states, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), have been held accountable for the observed tight inverse logarithmic relationship between the dissolved Cr concentration [Cr] and its isotopic composition (δ53Cr), whereby isotopically light Cr(III) is removed in surface waters and oxygen minimum zones[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Philipp Nasemann et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2020.06.027

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Increasing ocean stratification over the past half-century

Abstract.

"Seawater generally forms stratified layers with lighter waters near the surface and denser waters at greater depth. This stable configuration acts as a barrier to water mixing that impacts the efficiency of vertical exchanges of heat, carbon, oxygen and other constituents. Previous quantification of stratification change has been limited to simple differencing of surface and 200-m depth changes and has neglected the spatial complexity of ocean density change. Here, we quantify changes in ocean stratification down[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Guancheng Li  et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00918-2

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Factors controlling plankton community production, export flux, and particulate matter stoichiometry in the coastal upwelling system off Peru

Abstract.

"Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are among the most productive marine ecosystems on Earth. The production of organic material is fueled by upwelling of nutrient-rich deep waters and high incident light at the sea surface. However, biotic and abiotic factors can modify surface production and related biogeochemical processes. Determining these factors is important because EBUS are considered hotspots of climate change, and reliable predictions of their future functioning requires understanding of the mechanisms driving the biogeochemical cycles therein. In this field experiment, we used in situ mesocosms as tools to improve our mechanistic understanding of processes controlling organic matter cycling in the coastal Peruvian upwelling system.[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Lennart Thomas Bach et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4831-2020

Read the full article here.

 


Biogeochemistry and hydrography shape microbial community assembly and activity in the eastern topical North Pacific Ocean oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycles due to extensive microbial activity. How OMZ microbial communities assemble and respond to environmental variation is therefore essential to understanding OMZ functioning and ocean biogeochemistry. Sampling along depth profiles at five stations in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP), we captured systematic variations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and associated variables (nitrite, chlorophyll, and ammonium) with depth and between stations. We quantitatively analysed relationships between oceanographic gradients and microbial community assembly and activity based on paired 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. Overall microbial community[...] "

 

Source: Society for Applied Microbiology
Authors: J. Michael Berman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15215

Read the full article here.


Metabolic trait diversity shapes marine biogeography

Abstract.

"Climate and physiology shape biogeography, yet the range limits of species can rarely be ascribed to the quantitative traits of organisms1,2,3. Here we evaluate whether the geographical range boundaries of species coincide with ecophysiological limits to acquisition of aerobic energy4 for a global cross-section of the biodiversity of marine animals. We observe a tight correlation between the metabolic rate and the efficacy of oxygen supply, and between the temperature sensitivities[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Curtis Deutsch et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2721-

Read the full article here.

 


Phosphorus-limited conditions in the early Neoproterozoic ocean maintained low levels of atmospheric oxygen

Abstract.

"The redox chemistry of anoxic continental margin settings evolved from widespread sulfide-containing (euxinic) conditions to a global ferruginous (iron-containing) state in the early Neoproterozoic era (from ~1 to 0.8 billion years ago). Ocean redox chemistry exerts a strong control on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, a limiting nutrient, and hence on primary production, but the response of the phosphorus cycle to this major ocean redox transition has not been investigated. Here, we use a geochemical[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Romain Guilbaud et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-0548-7

Read the full article here.

 


Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability

Abstract.

"Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from the Redfield ratio, the molar ratio of oxygen to organic carbon consumed during respiration (i.e., the respiration quotient, r −O2:C  r−O2:C ) is consistently assumed constant but rarely, if ever, measured. Using a prognostic[...]"

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Allison R. Moreno et al.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004986117

Read the full article here.


Imprint of Trace Dissolved Oxygen on Prokaryoplankton Community Structure in an Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"The Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) is a large, persistent, and intensifying oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) that accounts for almost half of the total area of global OMZs. Within the OMZ core (∼350–700 m depth), dissolved oxygen is typically near or below the analytical detection limit of modern sensors (∼10 nM). Steep oxygen gradients above and below the OMZ core lead to vertical structuring of microbial communities that also vary between particle-associated (PA) and free-living (FL) size fractions [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Luis Medina Faull et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00360

Read the full article here.

 


Abundant nitrite-oxidizing metalloenzymes in the mesopelagic zone of the tropical Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"Numerous biogeochemical reactions occur within the oceans’ major oxygen minimum zones, but less attention has been paid to the open ocean extremities of these zones. Here we report measurements on oxygen minimum zone waters from the Eastern to the Central Tropical North Pacific, which we analysed using metaproteomic techniques to discern the microbial functions present and their influence on biogeochemical cycling. [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Mak A. Saito et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-020-0565-6

Read the full article here.


A revisit to the regulation of oxygen minimum zone in the Bay of Bengal

Abstract.

"Occurrence of intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is known in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), but it has been recently reported to have become more acute and is at its tipping point. Here, we show that the intensification of OMZ to acute condition is a random and short-term rather than perennial phenomenon based on re-evaluation of old and recent information in the BoB. Short-term modifications in dissolved oxygen (DO) in the OMZ are caused by balance among physical forcings: salinity stratification, occurrence of cyclonic (CE), and anticyclonic eddies (ACE). [...]"

Source: Journal of Earth System Science
Authors: B Sridevi and V V S S Sarma
DOI: 10.1007/s12040-020-1376-2

Read the full article here.


Anoxic metabolism after the 21st century in oxygen minimum zones

Abstract.

"Global models project a decrease of marine oxygen over the course of the 21th century. The future of marine oxygen becomes increasingly uncertain further into the future after yr 2100 , partly because ocean models differ in the way organic matter remineralisation continues under oxygen- and nitrate-free conditions. Using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity we found that under a business-as-usual CO2-emission scenario ocean deoxygenation further intensifies for several centuries until eventually ocean circulation re-establishes and marine oxygen increases again. (Oschlies et al. 2019, DOI 10.1038/s41467-019-10813-w). [...]"

Source: EGU General Assembly 2020
Authors: Wolfgang Koeve and Angela Landolfi
DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-13038

Read the full article here.


Intermediate water masses, a major supplier of oxygen for the eastern tropical Pacific ocean

Abstract.

"It is well known that Intermediate Water Masses (IWM) are sinking in high latitudes and ventilate the lower thermocline (500–1500 m depth). We here highlight how the IWM oxygen content and the IWM pathway along the Equatorial Intermediate Current System (EICS) towards the eastern tropical Pacific ocean are essential for the supply of oxygen to the lower thermocline and the Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs). [...]"

Source: Ocean Science
Authors: Olaf Duteil et al.
DOI: 10.5194/os-2020-17

Read the full article here.


Bioaccumulation of Trace Elements in Myctophids in the Oxygen Minimum Zone Ecosystem of the Gulf of California

Abstract.

"Myctophids are key members of mesopelagic communities with a world biomass estimated at 600 million tons. They play a central role in oceanic food webs and are known to perform diel vertical migrations, crossing the thermocline and reaching the oxygen minimum zone, however, very scarce information exists on trace element content in these organisms. Therefore, the trace elemental composition (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb) of Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense specimens was determined. Zinc (Zn) was the most common trace element for both species, T. mexicanus presented 39.8 µg.g−1 dw and B. panamense 30.6 µg.g−1 dw. [...]"

Source: Oceans
Authors: Cátia Figueiredo et al.
DOI: 10.3390/oceans1010004

Read the full article here.


Discovery and Mapping of the Triton Seep Site, Redondo Knoll: Fluid Flow and Microbial Colonization Within an Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"This paper examines a deep-water (∼900 m) cold-seep discovered in a low oxygen environment ∼30 km off the California coast in 2015 during an E/V Nautilus telepresence-enabled cruise. This Triton site was initially detected from bubble flares identified via shipboard multibeam sonar and was then confirmed visually using the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules. High resolution mapping (to 1 cm resolution) and co-registered imaging has provided us with a comprehensive site overview – both of the geologic setting and the extent of the associated microbial colonization. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Jamie K. S. Wagner et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00108

Read the full article here.


Enhanced Organic Carbon Burial in Sediments of Oxygen Minimum Zones Upon Ocean Deoxygenation

Abstract.

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean are expanding. This expansion is attributed to global warming and may continue over the next 10 to 100 kyrs due to multiple climate CO2-driven factors. The expansion of oxygen-deficient waters has the potential to enhance organic carbon burial in marine sediments, thereby providing a negative feedback on global warming. Here, we study the response of dissolved oxygen in the ocean to increased phosphorus and iron inputs due to CO2-driven enhanced weathering and increased dust emissions, respectively. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Itzel Ruvalcaba Baroni et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00839

Read the full article here.


The regulation of oxygen to low concentrations in marineoxygen-minimum zones

Abstract.

"The Bay of Bengal hosts persistent, measurable, but sub-micromolar, concentrations of oxygenin its oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ). Such low-oxygen conditions are not necessarily rare in theglobal ocean and seem also to characterize the OMZ of the Pescadero Basin in the Gulf of California,as well as the outer edges of otherwise anoxic OMZs, such as can be found, for example, in theEastern Tropical North Pacific. We show here that biological controls on oxygen consumption arerequired to allow the semistable persistence of low-oxygen conditions in OMZ settings; otherwise,only small changes in physical mixing or rates of primary production would drive the OMZ betweenanoxic and oxic states with potentially large swings in oxygen concentration. [...]"

Source: Journal of Marine Research
Authors: Donald E. Canfield et al.
 

Read the full article here.


Variability of dissolved oxygen in the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone and its driving mechanisms

Abstract.

"The Arabian Sea hosts one of the most intense, perennial Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) in the world ocean. Observations along a meridional transect at 68°E extending from 8 to 21°N showed large seasonal as well as interannual changes in the dissolved oxygen and nitrite concentrations. Unlike previous studies that used observations from the periphery of the OMZ, our observations are from its core and also allow us demarcating the southern extent of the OMZ. [...]"

Source: Journal of Marine Systems
Authors: Damodar M.Shenoy et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2020.103310 

Read the full article here.


The regulation of oxygen to low concentrations in marine oxygen-minimum zones

Abstract.

"The Bay of Bengal hosts persistent, measurable, but sub-micromolar, concentrations of oxygen in its oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ). Such low-oxygen conditions are not necessarily rare in the global ocean and seem also to characterize the OMZ of the Pescadero Basin in the Gulf of California, as well as the outer edges of otherwise anoxic OMZs, such as can be found, for example, in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. We show here that biological controls on oxygen consumption are required to allow the semistable persistence of low-oxygen conditions in OMZ settings; otherwise, only small changes in physical mixing or rates of primary production would drive the OMZ between anoxic and oxic states with potentially large swings in oxygen concentration. [...]"

Source: Journal of Marine Research 
Authors: Don E. Canfield et al.

Read the full article here.


Larval Fish Habitats and Deoxygenation in the Northern Limit of the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Mexico

Abstract.

"The present state of deoxygenation in the northern limits of the shallow oxygen minimum zone off Mexico is examined in order to detect its effects on larval fish habitats and consider the sensitivity of fish larvae to decreased dissolved oxygen. A series of cruises between 2000 and 2017 indicated a significant vertical expansion of low oxygen waters. The upper limit of suboxic conditions (<4.4 μmol/kg) has risen ~100 m at 19.5°N off Cabo Corrientes and ~50 m at 25°N in the mouth of the Gulf of California. The larval habitat distribution was related to the geographic variability of dissolved oxygen and water masses between these two latitudes. [...]"

Source: JGR Oceans
Authors: Laura Sánchez‐Velasco et al.
DOI: 10.1029/2019JC015414

Read the full article here.


Multidisciplinary Observing in the World Ocean’s Oxygen Minimum Zone Regions: From Climate to Fish — The VOICE Initiative

Abstract.

"Multidisciplinary ocean observing activities provide critical ocean information to satisfy ever-changing socioeconomic needs and require coordinated implementation. The upper oxycline (transition between high and low oxygen waters) is fundamentally important for the ecosystem structure and can be a useful proxy for multiple observing objectives connected to eastern boundary systems (EBSs) that neighbor oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Véronique Garçon et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00722

Read the full article here.


Dark carbon fixation in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone contributes to sedimentary organic carbon (SOM)

Abstract.

"In response to rising CO2 concentrations and increasing global sea surface temperatures, oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), or “dead zones”, are expected to expand. OMZs are fueled by high primary productivity, resulting in enhanced biological oxygen demand at depth, subsequent oxygen depletion, and attenuation of remineralization. This results in the deposition of organic carbon‐rich sediments. Carbon drawdown is estimated by biogeochemical models; however, a major process is ignored: carbon fixation in the mid‐ and lower water column. [...]"

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: Sabine K. Lengger et al.
DOI: 10.1029/2019GB006282

Read the full article here.


Controls on redox-sensitive trace metals in the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"The availability of the micronutrient iron (Fe) in surface waters determines primary production, N2 fixation, and microbial community structure in large parts of the world's ocean, and thus it plays an important role in ocean carbon and nitrogen cycles. Eastern boundary upwelling systems and the connected oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are typically associated with elevated concentrations of redox-sensitive trace metals (e.g., Fe, manganese (Mn), and cobalt (Co)), with shelf sediments typically forming a key source. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Insa Rapp et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-4157-2019

Read the full article here.


Extinction of cold-water corals on the Namibian shelf due to low oxygen contents

"They were also able to link this event with a shift in the Benguela upwelling system, and an associated intensification of the oxygen minimum zone in this region. The team has now published their findings in the journal Geology.

Known as 'ecosystem engineers', cold-water corals play an important role in the species diversity of the deep sea. The coral species Lophelia pertusa is significantly involved in reef formation. [...]"

Source: EurekAlert!

Read the full article here.


Ocean Deoxygenation and Copepods: Coping with Oxygen Minimum Zone Variability

Abstract.

"Increasing deoxygenation (loss of oxygen) of the ocean, including expansion of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), is a potentially important consequence of global warming. We examined present day variability of vertical distributions of copepod species in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) living in locations with different water column oxygen profiles and OMZ intensity (lowest oxygen concentration and its vertical extent in a profile). [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Karen F. Wishner, Brad Seibel, and Dawn Outram
DOI: 10.5194/bg-2019-394

Read the full article here.


Seasonal variability of the southern tip of the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the eastern South Pacific (30°‐38°S): A modeling study

Abstract.

"We investigate the seasonal variability of the southern tip (30°–38°S) of the eastern South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) based on a high horizontal resolution (1/12°) regional coupled physical‐biogeochemical model simulation. The simulation is validated by available in situ observations and the OMZ seasonal variability is documented. The model OMZ, bounded by the contour of 45 μM, occupies a large volume (4.5x104 km3) during the beginning of austral winter and a minimum (3.5x104 km3) at the end of spring, just 1 and 2 months after the southward transport of the Peru‐Chile Undercurrent (PCUC) is maximum and minimum, respectively.  [...]"

Source: JGR Oceans
Authors: Matias Pizarro‐Koch et al.
DOI: 10.1029/2019JC015201

Read the full article here.


The control of hydrogen sulfide on benthic iron and cadmium fluxes in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru

Abstract.

"Sediments in oxygen-depleted marine environments can be an important sink or source of bio-essential trace metals in the ocean. However, the key mechanisms controlling the release from or burial of trace metals in sediments are not exactly understood. Here, we investigate the benthic biogeochemical cycling of Fe and Cd in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. We combine bottom water profiles, pore water profiles, as well as benthic fluxes determined from pore water profiles and in-situ from benthic chamber incubations along a depth transect at 12° S. In agreement with previous studies, both concentration-depth profiles and in-situ benthic fluxes indicate a Fe release from sediments into bottom waters. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences  (Preprint)
Authors: Anna Plass et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-2019-390

Read the full article here.


Scenarios of Deoxygenation of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific During the Past Millennium as a Window Into the Future of Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract.

"Diverse studies predict global expansion of Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) as a consequence of anthropogenic global warming. While the observed dissolved oxygen concentrations in many coastal regions are slowly decreasing, sediment core paleorecords often show contradictory trends. This is the case for numerous high-resolution reconstructions of oxygenation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Konstantin Choumiline et al.
DOI: 10.3389/feart.2019.00237

Read the full article here.


High-throughput screening of sediment bacterial communities from Oxygen Minimum Zones of the northern Indian Ocean

Abstract.

"The Northern Indian Ocean host two recognized Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ): one in the Arabian Sea and the other in the Bay of Bengal region. The next-generation sequencing technique was used to understand the total bacterial diversity from the surface sediment of off Goa within the OMZ of Arabian Sea, and from off Paradip within the OMZ of Bay of Bengal. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences (preprint)
Authors: Jovitha Lincy and Cathrine Manohar
DOI: 10.5194/bg-2019-330

Read the full article here.


Ventilation of the Upper Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Coastal Region Off Mexico: Implications of El Niño 2015–2016

Abstract.

"As a result of anthropogenic activities, it has been predicted that the ocean will be challenged with rising temperature, increased stratification, ocean acidification, stronger more frequent tropical storms, and oxygen depletion. In the tropical Pacific off central Mexico all these phenomena are already occurring naturally, providing a laboratory from which to explore ocean biogeochemical dynamics that are predicted under future anthropogenic forcing conditions. "

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Pablo N. Trucco-Pignata et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00459

Read the full article here.


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