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Effect of environmental history on the habitat-forming kelp Macrocystis pyrifera responses to ocean acidification and warming: a physiological and mol

Abstract.

"The capacity of marine organisms to adapt and/or acclimate to climate change might differ among distinct populations, depending on their local environmental history and phenotypic plasticity. Kelp forests create some of the most productive habitats in the world, but globally, many populations have been negatively impacted by multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we compare the physiological and molecular responses to ocean acidification (OA) and warming (OW) of two populations of the giant kelp[...]"

 

Source: Nature Scientific Reports
Authors: Pamela A. Fernández et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82094-7

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Impacts of hypoxic events surpass those of future ocean warming and acidification

Abstract.

"Over the past decades, three major challenges to marine life have emerged as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions: ocean warming, acidification and oxygen loss. While most experimental research has targeted the first two stressors, the last remains comparatively neglected. Here, we implemented sequential hierarchical mixed-model meta-analyses (721 control–treatment comparisons) to compare the impacts of oxygen conditions associated with the current and continuously intensifying hypoxic events (1–3.5 O2 mg l−1) with those experimentally yielded by ocean warming (+4 °C) and acidification (−0.4 units) conditions[...]"

 

Source: Nature Ecology & Evolution 
Authors: Eduardo Sampaio et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01370-3

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Ocean acidification may slow the pace of tropicalization of temperate fish communities

Abstract.

"Poleward range extensions by warm-adapted sea urchins are switching temperate marine ecosystems from kelp-dominated to barren-dominated systems that favour the establishment of range-extending tropical fishes. Yet, such tropicalization may be buffered by ocean acidification, which reduces urchin grazing performance and the urchin barrens that tropical range-extending fishes prefer. Using ecosystems experiencing natural warming and acidification, we show that ocean acidification could buffer warming-facilitated[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Ericka O. C. Coni et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00980-w

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Extreme Levels of Ocean Acidification Restructure the Plankton Community and Biogeochemistry of a Temperate Coastal Ecosystem: A Mesocosm Study

Abstract.

"The oceans’ uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) decreases seawater pH and alters the inorganic carbon speciation – summarized in the term ocean acidification (OA). Already today, coastal regions experience episodic pH events during which surface layer pH drops below values projected for the surface ocean at the end of the century. Future OA is expected to further enhance the intensity of these coastal extreme pH events. To evaluate the influence of such episodic OA events in coastal regions, we deployed eight pelagic mesocosms[...]".

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Carsten Spisla et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.611157

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Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a species-poor early successional stage

Abracts.

"Long-term exposure to CO2-enriched waters can considerably alter marine biological community development, often resulting in simplified systems dominated by turf algae that possess reduced biodiversity and low ecological complexity. Current understanding of the underlying processes by which ocean acidification alters biological community development and stability remains limited, making the management of such shifts problematic. Here, we deployed recruitment tiles in reference[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Ben P. Harvey et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15455

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Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a species-poor early successional stage

Abstract.

"Long-term exposure to CO2-enriched waters can considerably alter marine biological community development, often resulting in simplified systems dominated by turf algae that possess reduced biodiversity and low ecological complexity. Current understanding of the underlying processes by which ocean acidification alters biological community development and stability remains limited, making the management of such shifts problematic. Here, we deployed recruitment[...]"

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Ben P. Harvey et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15455

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Coastal eutrophication drives acidification, oxygen loss, and ecosystem change in a major oceanic upwelling system

Abstract.

"Global change is leading to warming, acidification, and oxygen loss in the ocean. In the Southern California Bight, an eastern boundary upwelling system, these stressors are exacerbated by the localized discharge of anthropogenically enhanced nutrients from a coastal population of 23 million people. Here, we use simulations with a high-resolution, physical–biogeochemical model to quantify the link between terrestrial [...]"

 

Source: PNAS- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Faycal Kessouri et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018856118

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Seaweed farms provide refugia from ocean acidification

Abstract.

"Seaweed farming has been proposed as a strategy for adaptation to ocean acidification, but evidence is largely lacking. Changes of pH and carbon system parameters in surface waters of three seaweed farms along a latitudinal range in China were compared, on the weeks preceding harvesting, with those of the surrounding seawaters. Results confirmed that seaweed farming is efficient in buffering acidification, with Saccharina japonica showing the highest capacity of 0.10 pH increase within the aquaculture area[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Xi Xiao et al
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145192

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Global declines in coral reef calcium carbonate production under ocean acidification and warming

Abstract.

"Ocean warming and acidification threaten the future growth of coral reefs. This is because the calcifying coral reef taxa that construct the calcium carbonate frameworks and cement the reef together are highly sensitive to ocean warming and acidification. However, the global-scale effects of ocean warming and acidification on rates of coral reef net carbonate production remain poorly constrained despite a wealth of studies assessing their effects on the calcification of individual organisms[...]"

 

Source: PNAS- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Christopher E. Cornwall et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2015265118

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Changing carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of organic-matter export under ocean acidification

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification (OA) will affect marine biotas from the organism to the ecosystem level. Yet, the consequences for the biological carbon pump and thereby the oceanic sink for atmospheric CO2 are still unclear. Here we show that OA considerably alters the C/N ratio of organic-matter export (C/Nexport), a key factor determining efficiency of the biological pump. By synthesizing sediment-trap data from in situ mesocosm studies in different marine biomes[...]

 

Source: Nature Climate Change 
Authors: Jan Taucher et al.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00915-5

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