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Editorial: Drivers and consequences of ocean deoxygenation in tropical ecosystems

Abstract.

"Coastal habitats are under increasing anthropogenic pressures that jeopardize the survival and persistence of ecologically important marine life. One such stressor, increasingly recognized as a significant threat to marine coastal habitats, is deoxygenation (Breitburg et al., 2018; IPCC, 2023). The United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development has identified deoxygenation as a top international priority for ocean research, with efforts being led by the Global Ocean Oxygen Network (GO2NE) and affiliated programs (Global Ocean Oxygen Decade program). [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Maggie D. Johnson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1425902

Read the full article here.


Oxygen declination in the coastal ocean over the twenty-first century: Driving forces, trends, and impacts

Abstract.

"Oxygen declination in coastal oceans has accelerated drastically in recent decades, both in terms of severity and spatial extent, and such disappearance of oxygen leads to dead zones where life can't survive. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to nutrient pollution and climate change due to intensified anthropogenic activities. The annual statistical oxygen mean concentrations showed the current deoxygenation trends based on (WOA_2001–2018) data comparison of 200 m below the surface water from the first two decades of the 21st century. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Md Mesbah Uddin Bhuiyan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cscee.2024.100621

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Preprint: ISASO2 : Recent trends and regional patterns of Ocean Dissolved Oxygen change

Abstract.

"Recent estimates of the global inventory of dissolved oxygen (DO) have suggested a decrease of 2 % since the 1960s. However, due to the sparse historical oxygen data coverage, the DO inventory exhibits large regional uncertainties at interannual timescale. Using ISASO2, a new DO Argo-based optimally interpolated climatology https://doi.org/10.17882/52367 (Kolodziejczyk et al.,2021), we have estimated an updated regional oxygen inventory. Over the long term (~1980–2013), comparing the ISASO2 Argo fields with the first guess WOA18 built from the DO bottle samples fields extracted from WOD18, the broad tendency to global ocean deoxygenation remains robust in the upper 2000 m with -451±243 Tmol per decade. [...]".

 

Source: Earth System Science Data
Authors: Nicolas Kolodziejczyk et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2024-106

Read the full article here.


Preprint: Reviews and syntheses: Biological Indicators of Oxygen Stress in Water Breathing Animals

Abstract.

"Anthropogenic warming and nutrient over-enrichment of our oceans have resulted in significant, and often catastrophic, reductions in dissolved oxygen (deoxygenation). Stress on water-breathing animals from this deoxygenation has been shown to occur at all levels of biological organization: cellular; organ; individual; species; population; community; and ecosystem. Most climate forecasts predict increases in ocean deoxygenation, thus it is essential to develop reliable biological indicators of oxygen stress that can be used by regional and global oxygen monitoring efforts to detect and assess the impacts of deoxygenation on ocean life. [...]".

 

Source: EGUsphere 
Authors: Michael R. Roman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-616

Read the full article here.


Preprint: Signatures of Oxygen-Depleted Waters along the Sumatra-Java Coasts in the Southeastern Tropical Indian Ocean

Abstract.

"A prominent ocean region exhibiting depleted oxygen concentration is the northern Indian Ocean, whose projected deoxygenation trend in response to climate change requires a comprehensive understanding of the roles of ocean dynamics. We present newly compiled in situ data across platforms (e.g. cruises, Argo, buoy) in the Indonesian coasts of Sumatra and Java between 2010–2022. Combined with reanalysis products, our data detect oxygen-depleted waters attributed to the eastward advection of the northern Indian Ocean waters and monsoon-driven coastal upwelling. [...]".

 

Source: EGUsphere
Authors: Faisal Hamzah et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2024-451

Read the full article here.


Shifts in magnetic mineral assemblages support ocean deoxygenation before the end-Permian mass extinction

Abstract.

"Expansion of oceanic anoxia is a prevailing hypothesis for driving the marine end-Permian mass extinction and is mainly based on isotopic geochemical proxies. However, long-term oceanic redox conditions before the end-Permian mass extinction remain unresolved. Here we report a secular redox trend based on rock magnetic experiments and cerium anomalies through the Changhsingian and across the Permian-Triassic boundary at the Meishan section, China. Magnetic mineral assemblages changed dramatically at ca. 252.8 million years age (Ma), which indicates that oceanic deoxygenation started about 0.9 million years earlier than the end-Permian mass extinction. [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Min Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-024-01394-8

Read the full article here.


Simulated Abrupt Shifts in Aerobic Habitats of Marine Species in the Past, Present, and Future

Abstract.

"The physiological tolerances of marine species toward ambient temperature and oxygen can jointly be evaluated in a single metric: the metabolic index. Changes therein characterize a changing aerobic habitat tailored to species-specific thermal and hypoxia sensitivity traits. If the geographical limits of marine species as indicated by critical thresholds of the metabolic index shift abruptly in response to ocean warming and deoxygenation, aerobic habitat could potentially be lost abruptly. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Friederike Fröb et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2023EF004141

Read the full article here.


Adjusting metabolic rates and critical oxygen tension in planktonic copepods under increasing hypoxia in highly productive coastal upwelling zones

Abstract.

"Ongoing ocean deoxygenation is threatening marine organisms globally. In eastern boundary upwelling systems, planktonic copepods dominate the epipelagic zooplankton, being crucial in the marine food web. Yet, they must cope with severe hypoxia caused by shoaling of the oxygen minimum zone. Based on laboratory experiments during 2021, we found differential responses in the metabolic rate (MR) and critical oxygen partial pressure of three abundant copepods. Calanoides patagoniensis doubled its MR during the upwelling season, so better exploiting the spring phytoplankton bloom for feeding and reproduction while maintaining their critical oxygen partial pressure unchanged between seasons. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Leissing Frederick et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.12556

Read the full article here.


The global energy transition offers new options for mitigation of coastal hypoxia: Do we know enough?

Abstract.

"The mitigation of climate change and pollution-related hypoxia and anoxia is a growing challenge for coastal communities. Known ocean conservation measures do not show the desired fast results counteracting deoxygenation. The new infrastructure related to the coastal production of renewable energies linked to the production of green hydrogen can provide new possibilities of artificial ocean reoxygenation to mitigate coastal hypoxia, but has to be treated urgently and seriously from different scientific, engineering and socio-economic angles. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Patricia Handmann & Douglas Wallace
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.17228

Read the full article here.


Intra-colony spatial variance of oxyregulation and hypoxic thresholds for key Acropora coral species

Abstract.

"Oxygen (O2) availability is essential for healthy coral reef functioning, yet how continued loss of dissolved O2 via ocean deoxygenation impacts performance of reef building corals remains unclear. Here, we examine how intra-colony spatial geometry of important Great Barrier Reef (GBR) coral species Acropora may influence variation in hypoxic thresholds for upregulation, to better understand capacity to tolerate future reductions in O2 availability. We first evaluate the application of more streamlined models used to parameterise Hypoxia Response Curve data, models that have been used historically to identify variable oxyregulatory capacity. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Nicole J. Dilernia et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.11100

Read the full article here.


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