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Simulations of ocean deoxygenation in the historical era: insights from forced and coupled models

Abstract.

"Ocean deoxygenation due to anthropogenic warming represents a major threat to marine ecosystems and fisheries. Challenges remain in simulating the modern observed changes in the dissolved oxygen (O2). Here, we present an analysis of upper ocean (0-700m) deoxygenation in recent decades from a suite of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 6 (CMIP6) ocean biogeochemical simulations. The physics and biogeochemical simulations include both ocean-only (the Ocean Model Intercomparison Project Phase 1 and 2, OMIP1 and OMIP2) and coupled Earth system (CMIP6 Historical) configurations. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science 
Authors: Yohei Takano et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1139917

Read the full article here.


Impact of deoxygenation and warming on global marine species in the 21st century

Abstract.

"Ocean temperature and dissolved oxygen shape marine habitats in an interplay with species' physiological characteristics. Therefore, the observed and projected warming and deoxygenation of the world's oceans in the 21st century may strongly affect species' habitats. Here, we implement an extended version of the Aerobic Growth Index (AGI), which quantifies whether a viable population of a species can be sustained in a particular location. We assess the impact of projected deoxygenation and warming on the contemporary habitat of 47 representative marine species covering the epipelagic, mesopelagic, and demersal realms. [...]".

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Anne L. Morée et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-2425-2023

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Increasing hypoxia on global coral reefs under ocean warming

Abstract. 

"Ocean deoxygenation is predicted to threaten marine ecosystems globally. However, current and future oxygen concentrations and the occurrence of hypoxic events on coral reefs remain underexplored. Here, using autonomous sensor data to explore oxygen variability and hypoxia exposure at 32 representative reef sites, we reveal that hypoxia is already pervasive on many reefs. Eighty-four percent of reefs experienced weak to moderate (≤153 µmol O2 kg−1to ≤92 µmol O2 kg−1) hypoxia and 13% experienced severe (≤61 µmol O2 kg−1) hypoxia. Under different climate change scenarios based on four Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs) [...]".

 

Source: Nature 
Authors: Ariel K. Pezner et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-023-01619-2

Read the full article here.


A molecular perspective on the invasibility of the southern ocean benthos: The impact of hypoxia and temperature on gene expression

Abstract. 

"When an organism makes a long-distance transition to a new habitat, the associated environmental change is often marked and requires physiological plasticity of larvae, juveniles, or other migrant stages. Exposing shallow-water marine bivalves (Aequiyoldia cf. eightsii) from southern South America (SSA) and the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) to changes in temperature and oxygen availability, we investigated changes in gene expression in a simulated colonization experiment of the shores of a new continent after crossing of the Drake Passage, and in a warming scenario in the WAP. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers
Authors: Mariano Martínez et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2023.1083240

Read the full article here.


Warming, Acidification and Deoxygenation of the Ocean

Abstract. 

"The ocean plays an essential role in regulating Earth’s climate. The ocean provides many services, but two crucial ones are its ability to take up heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere and cycle both around the world in its vast currents, as well as store them away long term. The ocean is changing rapidly and often unnoticed by the general public. However, as the effects of climate change become more prevalent on the ocean, we will start to see a direct impact on human society. This chapter discusses three main climate change effects on the ocean: ocean warming, acidification, and loss of oxygen. [...]".

 

Source: Springer Nature
Authors: Helen S. Findlay
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-10812-9_2

Read the full article here.


Diverging Fates of the Pacific Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone and Its Core in a Warming World

Abstract. 

"Global ocean oxygen loss is projected to persist in the future, but Earth system models (ESMs) have not yet provided a consistent picture of how it will influence the largest oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the tropical Pacific. We examine the change in the Pacific OMZ volume in an ensemble of ESMs from the CMIP6 archive, considering a broad range of oxygen (O2) thresholds relevant to biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems (5–160 µmol/kg). Despite OMZ biases in the historical period of the simulations, the ESM ensemble projections consistently fall into three regimes across ESMs […]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Julius J.M. Busecke et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2021AV000470

Read the full article here.


Investigating ocean deoxygenation and the oxygen minimum zone in the Central Indo Pacific region based on the hindcast datasets

Abstract. 

"Deoxygenation is increasingly recognized as a significant environmental threat to the ocean following sea temperature rises due to global warming and climate change. Considering the cruciality of the deoxygenation impacts, it is important to assess the current status and predict the future possibility of ocean deoxygenation, for instance, within the Central Indo Pacific (CIP) regions represent climate-regulated marine areas. This study divided CIP into five regions then investigated the deoxygenation parameters (dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, and pH) collected from 1993 to 2021 sourced from in situ measurement and long-term hindcast data. [...]".

 

Source: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Authors: Karlina Triana et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-022-10615-6

Read the full article here.


Impact of warming and deoxygenation on the habitat distribution of Pacific halibut in the Northeast Pacific

Abstract. 

"Ocean warming and deoxygenation are already modifying the habitats of many aerobic organisms. Benthic habitat in the Northeast Pacific is sensitive to deoxygenation, as low oxygen concentrations occur naturally in continental shelf bottom waters. Here, we examine the potential impacts of deoxygenation and ocean warming on the habitat distribution of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), one of the most commercially important groundfish in North America. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library  
Authors: Ana C. Franco et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/fog.12610

Read the full article here.


Marine anoxia linked to abrupt global warming during Earth’s penultimate icehouse

Abstract.

"Piecing together the history of carbon (C) perturbation events throughout Earth’s history has provided key insights into how the Earth system responds to abrupt warming. Previous studies, however, focused on short-term warming events that were superimposed on longer-term greenhouse climate states. Here, we present an integrated proxy (C and uranium [U] isotopes and paleo CO2) and multicomponent modeling approach to investigate an abrupt C perturbation and global warming event (∼304 Ma) that occurred during a paleo-glacial state. We report pronounced negative C and U isotopic excursions coincident with a doubling of atmospheric CO2 partial pressure and a biodiversity nadir. [...]".

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Authors: Jitao Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2115231119

Read the full article here.


A committed fourfold increase in ocean oxygen loss

Abstract.

"Less than a quarter of ocean deoxygenation that will ultimately be caused by historical CO2 emissions is already realized, according to millennial-scale model simulations that assume zero CO2 emissions from year 2021 onwards. About 80% of the committed oxygen loss occurs below 2000 m depth, where a more sluggish overturning circulation will increase water residence times and accumulation of respiratory oxygen demand. According to the model results, the deep ocean will thereby lose more than 10% of its pre-industrial oxygen content even if CO2 emissions and thus global warming[...]".

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Andreas Oschlies
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22584-4 

Read the full article here.


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