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Spatial heterogeneity in benthic foraminiferal assemblages tracks regional impacts of paleoenvironmental change across Cretaceous OAE2

Abstract. 

"The impact of global climate events on local ecosystems can vary spatially. Understanding this potential heterogeneity can illuminate which environments will be most impacted and the proximal drivers of ecosystem responses. Cenomanian–Turonian marine deposits of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS) record paleoceanographic changes associated with the Greenhorn transgression and the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2). They provide an ideal setting to study basin-wide paleoecological responses during a global perturbation. [...]".

 

Source: Cambridge University Press
Authors: Raquel Bryant & Christina L. Belanger
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/pab.2022.47

Read the full article here.


Marine bioturbation collapse during Early Jurassic deoxygenation: implications for post-extinction marine ecosystem functioning

Abstract. 

"Climate change is undermining the health and integrity of seafloor ecosystems, with declines in bioturbation expected to impact future ecosystem functioning. We explored changes in the nature and degree of bioturbation during Early Jurassic global warming and ocean deoxygenation. Understanding how these communities responded can help anticipate how bioturbation and ecosystem functioning might change over large spatial and temporal scales. Trace and body fossils from outcrop and core in the Cleveland Basin, UK show how healthy seafloor communities deteriorated through the Pliensbachian spinatum Zone, and macroinfaunal behaviour [...]".

 

Source: Geological Society of London
Authors: Bryony A. Caswell & Liam Herringshaw
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1144/SP529-2022-226

Read the full article here.


No evidence for expansion of global ocean euxinia during the base Stairsian mass extinction event (Tremadocian, Early Ordovician)

Abstract.

"A Tremadocian (Early Ordovician, base Stairsian North American Stage) mass extinction event is recorded globally in rocks from several ancient continents and is accompanied by a globally correlated positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE; the largest during the Early Ordovician). In this study, elemental concentrations and uranium isotope compositions (δ238U) were measured for carbonate samples from three sections (along a proximal-to-distal transect: Ibex area, Shingle Pass, Meiklejohn Peak, respectively) in the Great Basin to test the role of ocean anoxia/euxinia on the base Stairsian mass extinction event. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Xinze Lu et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.11.028

Read the full article here.


Vanadium isotope evidence for widespread marine oxygenation from the late Ediacaran to early Cambrian

Abstract. 

"Early animals experienced multiple-phase radiations and extinctions from the late Ediacaran to early Cambrian. Oxygen likely played an important role in these evolutionary events, but detailed marine redox evolution during this period remains highly debated. The emerging vanadium (V) isotope system can better capture short-term perturbations to global ocean redox conditions. In this study, we analyzed V isotope compositions [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Wei Wei et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117942

Read the full article here.


Authigenic uranium deposition in the glacial North Atlantic: Implications for changes in oxygenation, carbon storage, and deep water-mass geometry

Abstract.

"Oxygen in the ocean has essential ecological and climatic functions, and can be an important indicator of deep-ocean ventilation and carbon storage. Previous studies are divided on whether the subsurface North Atlantic, which today is well-oxygenated, had higher or lower oxygen levels during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Crucially, the limited number of previous reconstructions precludes any conclusions regarding basin-wide patterns in past changes in oxygenation. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Yuxin Zhou & Jerry F. McManus
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2022.107914

Read the full article here.


Shallow- and deep-ocean Fe cycling and redox evolution across the Pliensbachian–Toarcian boundary and Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Panthalassa

Abstract.

"The late Pliensbachian to early Toarcian was characterized by major climatic and environmental changes, encompassing the early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, or Jenkyns Event, ∼183 Ma) and the preceding Pliensbachian–Toarcian boundary event (Pl/To). Information on seawater redox conditions through this time interval has thus far come mainly from European sections deposited in hydrographically restricted basins, and hence our understanding of the redox evolution of the open ocean (and in particular Panthalassa – the largest ocean to have existed) is limited. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Wenhan Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117959

Read the full article here.


Sedimentary molybdenum and uranium: Improving proxies for deoxygenation in coastal depositional environments

Abstract. 

"Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) enrichments are widely used to reconstruct changes in bottom water oxygen conditions in aquatic environments. Until now, most studies using Mo and U have focused on restricted suboxic-euxinic basins and continental margin oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), leaving mildly reducing and oxic (but eutrophic) coastal depositional environments vastly understudied. Currently, it is unknown: (1) to what extent Mo and U enrichment factors (Mo- and U-EFs) can accurately reconstruct oxygen conditions in coastal sites experiencing mild deoxygenation, and (2) to what degree secondary [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: K. Mareike Paul et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2022.121203

Read the full article here.


Otoliths of marine fishes record evidence of low oxygen, temperature and pH conditions of deep Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract.

"The deep-sea is rapidly losing oxygen, with profound implications for marine organisms. Within Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, such as the California and the Benguela Current Ecosystems, an important question is how the ongoing expansion, intensification and shoaling of Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) will affect deep-sea fishes throughout their lifetimes. One of the first steps to filling this knowledge gap is through the development of tools and techniques to track fishes’ exposure to hypoxic (<45 μmol kg-1), low-temperature (∼4–10°C) and low-pH (∼7.5) waters when inhabiting OMZs. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Leticia Maria Cavole et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2022.103941

Read the full article here.


Nature Scientific Reports collection on ocean hypoxia: Call for papers

Call for paper manuscripts

We would like to draw your attention to a new collection on ocean hypoxia in Scientific Reports.

The paper manuscript submission deadline is 4 April 2023.

For further information about the call, visit: https://www.nature.com/collections/bgdgcgahcf/


Intermediate water circulation drives distribution of Pliocene Oxygen Minimum Zones

Abstract. 

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a critical role in global biogeochemical cycling and act as barriers to dispersal for marine organisms. OMZs are currently expanding and intensifying with climate change, however past distributions of OMZs are relatively unknown. Here we present evidence for widespread pelagic OMZs during the Pliocene (5.3-2.6 Ma), the most recent epoch with atmospheric CO2 analogous to modern (~400-450 ppm). The global distribution of OMZ-affiliated planktic foraminifer, Globorotaloides hexagonus, and Earth System and Species Distribution Models show [...]". 

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Catherine V. Davis et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-35083-x

Read the full article here. 


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