News

Antarctic icebergs reorganize ocean circulation during Pleistocene glacials

Abstract.

"The dominant feature of large-scale mass transfer in the modern ocean is the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). The geometry and vigour of this circulation influences global climate on various timescales. Palaeoceanographic evidence suggests that during glacial periods of the past 1.5 million years the AMOC had markedly different features from today1; in the Atlantic basin, deep waters of Southern Ocean origin[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Aidan Starr et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-03094-7

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Ocean currents as a potential dispersal pathway for Antarctica’s most persistent non-native terrestrial insect

Abstract.

"The non-native midge Eretmoptera murphyi is Antarctica’s most persistent non-native insect and is known to impact the terrestrial ecosystems. It inhabits by considerably increasing litter turnover and availability of soil nutrients. The midge was introduced to Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, from its native South Georgia, and routes of dispersal to date have been aided by human activities, with little known about non-human-assisted methods of dispersal. This study is the first to determine the potential for dispersal [...]"

 

Source: Polar Biology
Authors: Jesamine C. Bartlett et al.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-020-02792-2

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Environmental controls on bacteriohopanepolyol profiles of benthic microbial mats from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

Abstract.

"Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are pentacyclic triterpenoid lipids that contribute to the structural integrity and physiology of some bacteria. Because some BHPs originate from specific classes of bacteria, BHPs have potential as taxonomically and environmentally diagnostic biomarkers. For example, a stereoisomer of bacteriohopanetetrol (informally BHT II) has been associated with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria and suboxic to anoxic marine environments where anammox is active. [...]"

Source: geobiology
Authors: Emily D. Matys et al.
DOI: 10.1111/gbi.12353

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