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Ironstone as a proxy of Paleozoic ocean oxygenation

Abstract. 

"Marine ironstone is a Phanerozoic biochemical sedimentary rock that contains abundant primary iron. Although rare, ironstone is conspicuous in the Paleozoic sedimentary record. Its iron source remains contentious, with traditional models invoking a continentally derived source. Increasing sedimentologic evidence suggests that many Paleozoic ironstones formed along favourably oriented continental margins where coastal upwelling delivered ferruginous waters, with the postulated source of iron being deep-ocean hydrothermal fluids. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edward J. Matheson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117715

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Low oxygen levels with high redox heterogeneity in the late Ediacaran shallow ocean: Constraints from I/(Ca + Mg) and Ce/Ce* of the Dengying Formation

Abstract. 

"Most previous studies focused on the redox state of the deep water, leading to an incomplete understanding of the spatiotemporal evolution of the redox-stratified ocean during the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition. In order to decode the redox condition of shallow marine environments during the late Ediacaran, this study presents I/(Ca + Mg), carbon and oxygen isotope, major, trace, and rare earth element data of subtidal to peritidal dolomite from the Dengying Formation at Yangba, South China. [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Yi Ding et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gbi.12520

Read the full article here.


Mo isotope composition of the 0.85 Ga ocean from coupled carbonate and shale archives: Some implications for pre-Cryogenian oxygenation

Abstract.

"This study addresses marine palaeoredox conditions of the mid-Neoproterozoic by analysing the Mo isotope, trace element, and U-Th-Pb isotope compositions of shallow water microbial carbonate, deep water pelagic carbonate, and shale from the Stone Knife Formation (SKF) in NW Canada. The U-Th-Pb isotope SKF systematics of reef microbialite carbonates, and the moderately expressed negative Ce anomalies are consistent with the presence of dissolved O2 in the surface waters. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Edel Mary O'Sullivan et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.precamres.2022.106760

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A transient oxygen increase in the Mesoproterozoic ocean at ∼1.44 Ga: Geochemical evidence from the Tieling Formation, North China Platform

Abstract.

"Oxygen availability is crucial for the evolution of eukaryotes in geological history, yet detailed Mesoproterozoic oceanic-atmospheric redox conditions remain enigmatic. In contrast to the generally accepted hypothesis of an anoxic mid-Proterozoic ocean and atmosphere, several transient oxygenation events may occur at the Earth’s surface during the Mesoproterozoic, especially for the period around 1.4 Ga. The North China Platform develops one of the most complete and continuous Mesoproterozoic stratigraphic successions globally, preserving key information on the redox state of the surface ocean–atmosphere system during the mid-Proterozoic. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Yang Yu et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.precamres.2021.106527

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Redox control on the tungsten isotope composition of seawater

Abstract.

"Free oxygen represents an essential basis for the evolution of complex life forms on a habitable Earth. The isotope composition of redox-sensitive trace elements such as tungsten (W) can possibly trace the earliest rise of oceanic oxygen in Earth’s history. However, the impact of redox changes on the W isotope composition of seawater is still unknown. Here, we report highly variable W isotope compositions in the water column of a redox-stratified basin (δ186/184W between +0.347 and +0.810 ‰) that contrast with the homogenous W isotope composition of the open ocean[...]"

 

Source: PNAS- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Florian Kurzweil et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2023544118

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Biogeochemical evolution and organic carbon deposition on the Northwestern European Shelf during the Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event

Abstract.

"The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, ~183 Ma) represents a well-known episode of organic-rich deposition, which is accompanied by a substantial negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE). Underpinning the relationships between the carbon-cycle perturbation, ocean anoxia, primary productivity feedbacks and the enrichment of sedimentary organic carbon remains a major challenge. Here, we present high-resolution geochemical[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Alexander J.P.Houben et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2020.110191

Read the full article here.


Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations

Abstract.

"The Permian/Triassic boundary approximately 251.9 million years ago marked the most severe environmental crisis identified in the geological record, which dictated the onwards course for the evolution of life. Magmatism from Siberian Traps is thought to have played an important role, but the causational trigger and its feedbacks are yet to be fully understood. Here we present a new boron-isotope-derived seawater pH record from fossil brachiopod shells deposited on the Tethys shelf that demonstrates a substantial decline in seawater pH coeval with the onset of the mass extinction in the latest Permian. Combined with carbon isotope data, our results are integrated in a geochemical model that resolves the carbon cycle dynamics as well as the ocean redox conditions[...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Hana Jurikova et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

Read the full article here.


Phosphorus-limited conditions in the early Neoproterozoic ocean maintained low levels of atmospheric oxygen

Abstract.

"The redox chemistry of anoxic continental margin settings evolved from widespread sulfide-containing (euxinic) conditions to a global ferruginous (iron-containing) state in the early Neoproterozoic era (from ~1 to 0.8 billion years ago). Ocean redox chemistry exerts a strong control on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, a limiting nutrient, and hence on primary production, but the response of the phosphorus cycle to this major ocean redox transition has not been investigated. [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Romain Guilbaud et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-020-0548-7

Read the full article here.


Redox condition and nitrogen cycle in the Permian deep mid-ocean: A possible contrast between Panthalassa and Tethys

Abstract.

"To constrain the redox conditions and related nitrogen cycles during the Middle Permian (Guadalupian) to latest Late Permian (Lopingian) deep mid-Panthalassa, we determined the abundances of major, trace, and rare earth elements along with the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in shales interbedded with deep-sea cherts that are well-exposed at the Gujo-Hachiman section in the Mino-Tanba belt, SW Japan. [...]"

Source: Global and Planetary Change
Authors: Wataru Fujisaki et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.09.015

Read the full article here.


Coupling of ocean redox and animal evolution during the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition

Abstract.

"The late Ediacaran to early Cambrian interval witnessed extraordinary radiations of metazoan life. The role of the physical environment in this biological revolution, such as changes to oxygen levels and nutrient availability, has been the focus of longstanding debate. Seemingly contradictory data from geochemical redox proxies help to fuel this controversy. As an essential nutrient, nitrogen can help to resolve this impasse by establishing linkages between nutrient supply, ocean redox, and biological changes. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Dan Wang et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-04980-5

Read the full article here.


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