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The palynology of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event at Dormettingen, southwest Germany, with emphasis on changes in vegetational dynamics

Abstract.

"The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE; ~ 183 Ma) represents an episode of marine anoxia that lasted for several hundred thousand years. Abiotic factorscontributing to the formation of the T-OAE, such as global warming, changes in weathering intensity, or sea-level change, are associated with a marked change in carbon cycling. While these factors are well studied, detailed palynological data, including marine and terrestrial palynomorphs, is still missing. Here we present comprehensive palynological data from the sedimentologically and geochemically well constrained T-OAE section in Dormettingen (SW Germany). [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Francesca Galasso et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.revpalbo.2022.104701

Read the full article here.


Oceanic anoxia and extinction in the latest Ordovician

Abstract.

"The Late Ordovician (Hirnantian) mass extinction (LOME) was marked by two discrete pulses of high species turnover rates attributed to glacial cooling (LOME-1) and subsequent expansion of anoxic marine conditions (LOME-2). However, the mechanisms and extent of global marine anoxia remain controversial. In this study, we present uranium isotope (U) data from a new Ordovician-Silurian (O-S) boundary carbonate section in the Southwest China to explore the extent/duration of the global marine anoxia, and links to the LOME. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Mu Liu et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2022.117553

Read the full article here.


Extensive marine anoxia in the European epicontinental sea during the end-Triassic mass extinction

Abstract. 

"Warming-induced marine anoxia has been hypothesized as an environmental stressor for the end-Triassic mass extinction (ETME), but links between the spread of marine anoxia and the two phases of extinction are poorly constrained. Here, we report iron speciation and trace metal data from the Bristol Channel Basin and Larne Basin of the NW European epicontinental sea (EES), spanning the Triassic–Jurassic (T–J) transition (~ 202–200 Ma). Results show frequent development of anoxic-ferruginous conditions, interspersed with ephemeral euxinic episodes in the Bristol Channel Basin during the latest Rhaetian, whereas the contemporaneous Larne Basin remained largely oxygenated, suggesting heterogeneous redox conditions between basins. Subsequently, more persistent euxinic conditions prevailed across the T–J boundary in both basins, coinciding precisely with the second phase of the ETME. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Tianchen He et al. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103771

Read the full article here.


Shallow ocean oxygen decline during the end-Triassic mass extinction

Abstract.

"The end-Triassic mass extinction (ETME) was associated with intensified deep-water anoxia in epicontinental seas and mid-depth waters, yet the absolute oxygenation state in the shallow ocean is uncharacterized. Here we report carbonate-associated iodine data from the peritidal Mount Sparagio section (Southern Italy) that documents the ETME (~ 200 Ma) in the western Tethys. We find a sharp drop in carbonate I/(Ca + Mg) ratios across the extinction horizon and persisting into the Early Jurassic. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Tianchen He et al.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2022.103770

Read the full article here. 


Extensive marine anoxia associated with the Late Devonian Hangenberg Crisis

Abstract.

"The global Hangenberg Crisis near the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary (DCB) represents one of the major Phanerozoic mass extinction events, which shaped the roots of modern vertebrate biodiversity. Marine anoxia has been cited as the proximate kill mechanism for this event. However, the detailed timing, duration, and extent of global marine redox chemistry changes across this critical interval remain controversial because most of the studies to date only constrain changes in local or regional redox chemistry. [...]"

Source: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Authors: Feifei Zhang et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2019.115976

Read the full article here.


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