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Intensive peatland wildfires during the Aptian–Albian oceanic anoxic event 1b: Evidence from borehole SK-2 in the Songliao Basin, NE China

Abstract. 

"The Cretaceous has been considered a “high-fire” world accompanied by widespread by-products of combustion in the rock record. The mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 1b (OAE1b) is marked by one of the major perturbations in the global carbon cycle characterized by deposition of organic-rich sediments in both marine and terrestrial settings. However, our understanding is still limited on changes in wildfire activity during OAE1b period. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Zhi-Hui Zhang et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jop.2022.06.002

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Quantifying the Contribution of Ocean Mesoscale Eddies to Low Oxygen Extreme Events

Abstract.

"Ocean mesoscale eddies have been identified as drivers of localized extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration ([O2]) conditions in the subsurface. We employ a global physical-biogeochemical ocean model at eddy-permitting resolution to conduct a census of open-ocean eddies near Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems adjacent to tropical Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs). We track cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies with a surface signature over the period 1992–2018 and isolate their subsurface oxygen characteristics. We identify strongly deoxygenating eddies and quantify their contribution to low [O2] extreme events. [...]".

 

Source: Geophysical Research Letters
Authors: Jamie Atkins et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2022GL098672

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Spatio-temporal variations in culturable bacterial community associated with denitrification in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

Abstract. 

"The Arabian Sea (AS) oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a site of intense denitrification, contributing to 20% of the global oceanic denitrification, playing a significant role in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, the structure and diversity of culturable bacterial communities inhabiting the water column of the AS OMZ were investigated through phylogenetic analysis and nitrate-utilizing ability was studied through culture-based studies. A total of 248 isolates collected during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon season were analysed for 16S rRNA gene sequences. [...]".

 

Source: Marine Biology Research
Authors: Ujwala Amberkar et al. 
DOI: 10.1080/17451000.2022.2086700

Read the full article here.


Oxygen availability driven trends in DOM molecular composition and reactivity in a seasonally stratified fjord

Abstract. 

"Ocean deoxygenation could potentially trigger substantial changes in the composition and reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool, which plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. To evaluate links between DOM dynamics and oxygen availability, we investigated the DOM composition under varying levels of oxygen in a seasonally hypoxic fjord through a monthly time-series over two years. We used ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) to characterize DOM on a molecular level. [...]".

 

Source: Science Direct 
Authors: Xiao Chen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2022.118690

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Enhanced phosphorus recycling during past oceanic anoxia amplified by low rates of apatite authigenesis

Abstract.

"Enhanced recycling of phosphorus as ocean deoxygenation expanded under past greenhouse climates contributed to widespread organic carbon burial and drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Redox-dependent phosphorus recycling was more efficient in such ancient anoxic marine environments, compared to modern anoxic settings, for reasons that remain unclear. Here, we show that low rates of apatite authigenesis in organic-rich sediments can explain the amplified phosphorus recycling in ancient settings as reflected in highly elevated ratios of organic carbon to total phosphorus. [...]".

 

Source: Science Advances 
Authors: Nina M. Papadomanolaki et al.
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abn2370

Read the full article here.


Competing and accelerating effects of anthropogenic nutrient inputs on climate-driven changes in ocean carbon and oxygen cycles

Abstract. 

"Nutrient inputs from the atmosphere and rivers to the ocean are increased substantially by human activities. However, the effects of increased nutrient inputs are not included in the widely used CMIP5 Earth system models, which introduce bias into model simulations of ocean biogeochemistry. Here, using historical simulations by an Earth system model with perturbed atmospheric and riverine nutrient inputs, we show that the contribution of anthropogenic nutrient inputs to past global changes in ocean biogeochemistry is of similar magnitude to the effect of climate change. [...]". 

 

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Akitomo Yamamoto et al. 
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abl9207

Read the full article here.


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