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Global declines in coral reef calcium carbonate production under ocean acidification and warming

Abstract.

"Ocean warming and acidification threaten the future growth of coral reefs. This is because the calcifying coral reef taxa that construct the calcium carbonate frameworks and cement the reef together are highly sensitive to ocean warming and acidification. However, the global-scale effects of ocean warming and acidification on rates of coral reef net carbonate production remain poorly constrained despite a wealth of studies assessing their effects on the calcification of individual organisms[...]"

 

Source: PNAS- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Christopher E. Cornwall et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2015265118

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The poleward enhanced Arctic Ocean cooling machine in a warming climate

Abstract.

"As a cooling machine of the Arctic Ocean, the Barents Sea releases most of the incoming ocean heat originating from the North Atlantic. The related air-sea heat exchange plays a crucial role in both regulating the climate and determining the deep circulation in the Arctic Ocean and beyond. It was reported that the cooling efficiency of this cooling machine has decreased significantly. In this study, we find that the overall cooling efficiency did not really drop: When the cooling efficiency decreased in the southern Barents Sea[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Qi Shu et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23321-7

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Zooplankton grazing of microplastic can accelerate global loss of ocean oxygen

Abstract.

"Global warming has driven a loss of dissolved oxygen in the ocean in recent decades. We demonstrate the potential for an additional anthropogenic driver of deoxygenation, in which zooplankton consumption of microplastic reduces the grazing on primary producers. In regions where primary production is not limited by macronutrient availability, the reduction of grazing pressure on primary producers causes export production to increase. Consequently, organic particle remineralisation in[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications 
Authors: K. Kvale et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22554-w

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Opposite response of strong and moderate positive Indian Ocean Dipole to global warming

Abstract.

"A strong positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) induces weather extremes such as the 2019 Australian bushfires and African floods. The impact is influenced by sea surface temperature (SST), yet models disagree on how pIOD SST may respond to greenhouse warming. Here we find increased SST variability of strong pIOD events, with strong equatorial eastern Indian Ocean cool anomalies, but decreased variability of moderate pIOD events, dominated by western warm anomalies[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Wenju Cai et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00943-1

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Regional patterns and temporal evolution of ocean iron fertilization and CO2 drawdown during the last glacial termination

Abstract.

"The last time Earth's climate experienced geologically rapid global warming was associated with the last glacial termination, when atmospheric CO2 concentrations rose from 180 ppmv during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 26-19 kaBP) to ∼260 ppmv by the early Holocene (12-8 kaBP). About one quarter of that difference is thought to be due to a stronger biological pump during glacial times, driven by increased aeolian dust deposition and hence greater iron availability in[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Fabrice Lambert et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2020.116675

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Impacts of hypoxic events surpass those of future ocean warming and acidification

Abstract.

"Over the past decades, three major challenges to marine life have emerged as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions: ocean warming, acidification and oxygen loss. While most experimental research has targeted the first two stressors, the last remains comparatively neglected. Here, we implemented sequential hierarchical mixed-model meta-analyses (721 control–treatment comparisons) to compare the impacts of oxygen conditions associated with the current and continuously intensifying hypoxic[...]"

 

Source: Nature Ecology and Evolution
Authors: Eduardo Sampaio et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01370-3

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Increased carbon capture by a silicate-treated forested watershed affected by acid deposition

Abstract.

"Meeting internationally agreed-upon climate targets requires carbon dioxide removal (CDR) strategies coupled with an urgent phase-down of fossil fuel emissions. However, the efficacy and wider impacts of CDR are poorly understood. Enhanced rock weathering (ERW) is a land-based CDR strategy requiring large-scale field trials. Here we show that a low 3.44 t ha−1 wollastonite treatment in an 11.8 ha acid-rain-impacted forested watershed in New Hampshire, USA, led to cumulative carbon capture by carbonic acid weathering of 0.025–0.13 t CO2 ha−1 over 15 years. Despite a 0.8–2.4 t CO2 ha−1 logistical carbon penalty from mining, grinding, transportation[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Lyla L. Taylor et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-169-2021

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Sensitivity of 21st-century projected ocean new production changes to idealized biogeochemical model structure

Abstract.

"While there is agreement that global warming over the 21st century is likely to influence the biological pump, Earth system models (ESM) display significant divergence in their projections of future new production. This paper quantifies and interprets the sensitivity of projected changes in new production in an idealized global ocean-biogeochemistry model. The model includes two tracers that explicitly represent nutrient transport, light- and nutrient-limited nutrient uptake by the ecosystem (new production), and export via sinking organic particles. Globally, new production declines with warming due to reduced surface nutrient availability, as expected. However, the magnitude[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Genevieve Jay Brett et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-479

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Enhanced Organic Carbon Burial in Sediments of Oxygen Minimum Zones Upon Ocean Deoxygenation

Abstract.

"Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean are expanding. This expansion is attributed to global warming and may continue over the next 10 to 100 kyrs due to multiple climate CO2-driven factors. The expansion of oxygen-deficient waters has the potential to enhance organic carbon burial in marine sediments, thereby providing a negative feedback on global warming. Here, we study the response of dissolved oxygen in the ocean to increased phosphorus and iron inputs due to CO2-driven enhanced weathering and increased dust emissions, respectively. We use an ocean biogeochemical model[...]"

Source: frontiers in the Marine Science
Authors: Itzel Ruvalcaba Baroni et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00839

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Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability

Abstract.

"Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from the Redfield ratio, the molar ratio of oxygen to organic carbon consumed during respiration (i.e., the respiration quotient, r −O2:C  r−O2:C ) is consistently assumed constant but rarely, if ever, measured. Using a prognostic[...]"

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Allison R. Moreno et al.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004986117

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