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Benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients under the influence of macrobenthic fauna on the periphery of the intermittently hypoxic zone in the Baltic Sea

Abstract.

"Understanding the role of benthic organisms in marine sediments is becoming increasingly important with the growing problem of eutrophication of marine ecosystems around the world, including the Baltic Sea. Therefore, we have conducted a series of incubation experiments on sediment cores collected from sites characterized by varying oxygen conditions and measured the influx (uptake by sediment) of oxygen as well as the sediment–water exchange of phosphate, ammonia and silicate.[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Halina Kendzierska et al.
Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2020.151439

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Biogeochemistry and hydrography shape microbial community assembly and activity in the eastern topical North Pacific Ocean oxygen minimum zone

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycles due to extensive microbial activity. How OMZ microbial communities assemble and respond to environmental variation is therefore essential to understanding OMZ functioning and ocean biogeochemistry. Sampling along depth profiles at five stations in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP), we captured systematic variations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and associated variables (nitrite, chlorophyll, and ammonium) with depth and between stations. We quantitatively analysed relationships between oceanographic gradients and microbial community assembly and activity based on paired 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA sequencing. Overall microbial community[...] "

 

Source: Society for Applied Microbiology
Authors: J. Michael Berman et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15215

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Impacts of climate change on dissolved oxygen concentration relevant to the costal and marine environment around the UK

Abstract.

"The decline in dissolved oxygen and onset of oxygen deficiency and hypoxia are naturally occurring phenomenon in aquatic environments, typically occurring on seasonal timescales. Over decadal timescales, there has been a measurable decline in dissolved oxygen concentrations in the global ocean due to warming caused by anthropogenic activity. Approximately 15% of the global decline in oxygen has been attributed to reduced solubility in response to ocean warming, with the remaining 85% due to intensified stratification. The relative contribution of these factors in coastal and shelf-sea waters is currently unknown. In UK waters, sustained observations in the North[...]"

 

Source: MCCIP Science Review
Authors: Mahaffey, C et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14465/2020.arc02.oxy

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The Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Ecosystems and Reliant Human Communities

Abstract.

"Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation, along with agriculture and land-use practices are causing wholesale increases in seawater CO2 and inorganic carbon levels; reductions in pH; and alterations in acid-base chemistry of estuarine, coastal, and surface open-ocean waters. On the basis of laboratory experiments and field studies of naturally elevated CO2 marine environments, widespread biological impacts of human-driven ocean acidification have been posited, ranging from changes in organism physiology and population dynamics to altered communities and ecosystems. Acidification, in conjunction with other climate change–related environmental stresses, particularly under future climate change[...]"

 

Source: Annual Review of Environment and Resources
Authors: Scott C. Doney et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-environ-012320-083019

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The role of calcium in regulating marine phosphorus burial and atmospheric oxygen

Abstract.

"The marine phosphorus cycle plays a critical role in controlling the extent of global primary productivity and thus atmospheric pO2 on geologic time scales. However, previous attempts to model carbon–phosphorus-oxygen feedbacks have neglected key parameters that could shape the global P cycle. Here we present new diagenetic models to fully parameterize marine P burial. We have also coupled this diagenetic framework to a global carbon cycle model. We find that seawater calcium concentration, by strongly influencing carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) formation, is a key factor controlling global phosphorus cycling, and therefore plays[...]"

 

Source: Nature Communications 
Authors: Mingyu Zhao et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15673-3

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Metabolic trait diversity shapes marine biogeography

Abstract.

"Climate and physiology shape biogeography, yet the range limits of species can rarely be ascribed to the quantitative traits of organisms1,2,3. Here we evaluate whether the geographical range boundaries of species coincide with ecophysiological limits to acquisition of aerobic energy4 for a global cross-section of the biodiversity of marine animals. We observe a tight correlation between the metabolic rate and the efficacy of oxygen supply, and between the temperature sensitivities[...]"

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Curtis Deutsch et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2721-

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Can microplastics pose a threat to ocean carbon sequestration?

Abstract.

"Global climate change has attracted worldwide attention. The ocean is the largest active carbon pool on the planet and plays an important role in global climate change. However, marine plastic pollution is getting increasingly serious due to the large consumption and mismanagement of global plastics. The impact of marine plastics on ecosystem responsible for the gas exchange and circulation of marine CO2 may cause more greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, in this paper, threats of marine microplastics to ocean carbon sequestration are discussed. Marine microplastics[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Maocai Shen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2019.110712

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Coral reef survival under accelerating ocean deoxygenation

Abstract.

"Global warming and local eutrophication simultaneously lower oxygen (O2) saturation and increase biological O2 demands to cause deoxygenation. Tropical shallow waters, and their coral reefs, are particularly vulnerable to extreme low O2 (hypoxia) events. These events can drive mass mortality of reef biota; however, they currently remain unaccounted for when considering coral reef persistence under local environmental alterations and global climatic change. In this Perspective, we integrate existing biological, ecological and geochemical[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: David J. Hughes et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0737-9

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Observing the Global Ocean with Biogeochemical-Argo

Abstract.

"Biogeochemical-Argo (BGC-Argo) is a network of profiling floats carrying sensors that enable observation of as many as six essential biogeochemical and bio-optical variables: oxygen, nitrate, pH, chlorophyll a, suspended particles, and downwelling irradiance. This sensor network represents today's most promising strategy for collecting temporally and vertically resolved observations of biogeochemical properties throughout the ocean. All data are freely available within 24 hours of transmission. These data fill large gaps in ocean-observing systems and support three ambitions: gaining a better understanding of biogeochemical processes (e.g., the biological[...]"

 

Source: Annual Review of Marine Science
Authors: Hervé Claustre et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-010419-010956

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Phosphorus-limited conditions in the early Neoproterozoic ocean maintained low levels of atmospheric oxygen

Abstract.

"The redox chemistry of anoxic continental margin settings evolved from widespread sulfide-containing (euxinic) conditions to a global ferruginous (iron-containing) state in the early Neoproterozoic era (from ~1 to 0.8 billion years ago). Ocean redox chemistry exerts a strong control on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, a limiting nutrient, and hence on primary production, but the response of the phosphorus cycle to this major ocean redox transition has not been investigated. Here, we use a geochemical[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Romain Guilbaud et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-0548-7

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