News

Building the Knowledge-to-Action Pipeline in North America: Connecting Ocean Acidification Research and Actionable Decision Support

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification (OA) describes the progressive decrease in the pH of seawater and other cascading chemical changes resulting from oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon. These changes can have important implications for marine ecosystems, creating risk for commercial industries, subsistence communities, cultural practices, and recreation. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Jessica N. Cross et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00356

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Scientists, students to conduct first live, interactive public broadcasts from arctic ocean

"A team of natural and social scientists, supported by 25 post-secondary students from the U.S. and Canada, will study vital signs of a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean this summer, and offer the public a chance to share the experience in real time.

The innovative, 18-day Northwest Passage Project research expedition will depart on July 18 from the U.S. Air Base in Thule, Greenland, aboard the Swedish Icebreaker Oden, returning to Thule August 4 after a 2,000 nautical mile voyage through the Northwest Passage [...]"

Source: EurekAlert!

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Observing an anticyclonic eddy in the South China Sea using multiple underwater gliders

Abstract.

"Mesoscale eddies, as a considerable contributor to the transport of ocean heat, dissolved oxygen and other biochemical tracers, have an important influence on the distribution of marine resources and global climate change. The purpose of this research is to capture the high variability of an anticyclonic eddy in South China Sea to observe its thermohaline vertical structure in different transections. [...]"

Source: OCEANS 2018 MTS/IEEE Charleston
Authors: Shufeng Li et al.
DOI: 10.1109/OCEANS.2018.8604623

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The far-future ocean: Warm yet oxygen-rich

"The oceans are losing oxygen. Numerous studies based on direct measurements in recent years have shown this. Since water can dissolve less gas as temperatures rise, these results were not surprising. In addition to global warming, factors such as eutrophication of the coastal seas also contribute to the ongoing deoxygenation. [...]"

Source: Phys.org

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Loss of fixed nitrogen causes net oxygen gain in a warmer future ocean

Abstract.

"Oceanic anoxic events have been associated with warm climates in Earth history, and there are concerns that current ocean deoxygenation may eventually lead to anoxia. Here we show results of a multi-millennial global-warming simulation that reveal, after a transitory deoxygenation, a marine oxygen inventory 6% higher than preindustrial despite an average 3 °C ocean warming. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Andreas Oschlies et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-10813-w

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Seasonal changes in the chemical composition and reactivity of dissolved organic matter at the land-ocean interface of a subtropical river

Abstract.

"Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a critical component in aquatic ecosystems, yet its seasonal variability and reactivity remain not well constrained. These were investigated at the land-ocean interface of a subtropical river (Minjiang River, SE China), using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. [...]"

Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Authors: Liyang Yang et al.
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-019-05700-2

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Exploring the Susceptibility of Turbid Estuaries to Hypoxia as a Prerequisite to Designing a Pertinent Monitoring Strategy of Dissolved Oxygen

Abstract.

"Globally, there has been a decrease in dissolved oxygen in the oceans, that is more pronounced in coastal waters, resulting in more frequent hypoxia exposure for many marine animals. Managing hypoxia requires an understanding of the dynamics of dissolved oxygen (DO) where it occurs. The French coast facing the Bay of Biscay (N-E Atlantic Ocean) hosts at least a dozen tidal and turbid estuaries, but only the large estuaries of the Gironde and the Loire, are subject to a continuous monitoring. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science 
Authors: Sabine Schmidt et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00352

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Will giant polar amphipods be first to fare badly in an oxygen-poor ocean? Testing hypotheses linking oxygen to body size

Abstract.

"It has been suggested that giant Antarctic marine invertebrates will be particularly vulnerable to declining O2 levels as our ocean warms in line with current climate change predictions. Our study provides some support for this oxygen limitation hypothesis, with larger body sizes being generally more sensitive to O2 reductions than smaller body sizes. [...]"

Source: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Authors: John I. Spicer  and Simon A. Morley
DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2019.0034

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The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

"Researchers have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen than smaller animals, and so will be more sensitive to future global climate change. However, evolutionary innovation can to some extent offset any respiratory disadvantages of large body size. [...]"

Source: Science Daily / University of Plymouth

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Nitrifier abundance and diversity peak at deep redox transition zones

Abstract.

"More than half of the global ocean floor is draped by nutrient-starved sediments characterized by deep oxygen penetration and a prevalence of oxidized nitrogen. Despite low energy availability, this habitat hosts a vast microbial population, and geochemical characteristics suggest that nitrogen compounds are an energy source critical to sustaining this biomass. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Rui Zhao et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-44585-6

Read the full article here.


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