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Role of organic components in regulating denitrification in coastal water of Daya Bay, southern China

Abstract.

"Both dissolved and particulate organic materials have been proposed to be important factors in regulating the heterotrophic denitrification in various aquatic environments. However, specific pathways and mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, water column samples were collected from Daya Bay, southern China, to examine the relationships between potential denitrification and different organic components in the water column. Bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was categorized into three major components including terrigenous fluorescent (tFDOC), autochthonous fluorescent (bFDOC) and non-fluorescent (nFDOC) fractions, while the bulk particulate organic carbon (POC) was divided into terrigenous (tPOC) and autochthonous (bPOC) based on an isotope mixing model [...]"

Source: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts
Authors: Jian Zeng
DOI: 10.1039/C8EM00558C

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Yield stability analysis reveals sources of large-scale nitrogen loss from the US Midwest

Abstract.

"Loss of reactive nitrogen (N) from agricultural fields in the U.S. Midwest is a principal cause of the persistent hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. We used eight years of high resolution satellite imagery, field boundaries, crop data layers, and yield stability classes to estimate the proportion of N fertilizer removed in harvest (NUE) versus left as surplus N in 8 million corn (Zea mays) fields at subfield resolutions of 30 × 30 m (0.09 ha) across 30 million ha of 10 Midwest states. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Bruno Basso et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-42271-1

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Coastal Mooring Observing Networks and Their Data Products: Recommendations for the Next Decade

Abstract.

"Instrumented moorings (hereafter referred to as moorings), which are anchored buoys or an anchored configuration of instruments suspended in the water column, are highly valued for their ability to host a variety of interchangeable oceanographic and meteorological sensors. This flexibility makes them a useful technology for meeting end user and science-driven requirements. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Kathleen Bailey et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00180

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Small zooplankton rings the alarm for oxygen loss in big oceans

"Hypoxia, a low level of oxygen that limits the physiological functions of animals, is a topic that fascinates many biologists. As climate change progresses, the frequency of hypoxic episodes in aquatic environments is increasing, putting fish species under stress and even reducing populations in some cases. But it is not only fish that suffer the ill effects of hypoxia. [...]"

Source: Journal of Experimental Biology
Author: Yangfan Zhang
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.199141

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Assessment of the impact of spatial resolution on ROMS simulated upper-ocean biogeochemistry of the Arabian Sea from an operational perspective

Abstract.

"The resolution of the model emerges to be an important factor in simulating the real oceanic features. In this paper, the performance of two coupled bio-physical models, having spatial resolutions 1/12° (∼9 km) and 1/4° (∼25 km) configured using Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), have been evaluated in simulating upper ocean dynamics of the Arabian Sea. [...]"

Source: Journal of Operational Oceanography
Authors: Kunal Chakraborty et al.
DOI: 10.1080/1755876X.2019.1588697

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Carbon cycling in the North American coastal ocean: a synthesis

Abstract.

"A quantification of carbon fluxes in the coastal ocean and across its boundaries with the atmosphere, land, and the open ocean is important for assessing the current state and projecting future trends in ocean carbon uptake and coastal ocean acidification, but this is currently a missing component of global carbon budgeting. This synthesis reviews recent progress in characterizing these carbon fluxes for the North American coastal ocean. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Katja Fennel et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-1281-2019

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Microbial ecosystem dynamics drive fluctuating nitrogen loss in marine anoxic zones

Abstract.

"The dynamics of nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean’s oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) are thought to be driven by climate impacts on ocean circulation and biological productivity. Here we analyze a data-constrained model of the microbial ecosystem in an ODZ and find that species interactions drive fluctuations in local- and regional-scale rates of N loss, even in the absence of climate variability. [...]"

Source: PNAS
Authors: Justin L. Penn et al.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1818014116

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An assessment of the predictability of column minimum dissolved oxygen concentrations in Chesapeake Bay using a machine learning model

Abstract.

"Subseasonal to seasonal forecasts have the potential to be a useful tool for managing estuarine fisheries and water quality, and with increasing skill at forecasting conditions at these time scales in the atmosphere and open ocean, skillful forecasts of estuarine salinity, temperature, and biogeochemistry may be possible. In this study, we use a machine learning model to assess the predictability of column minimum dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay at a monthly time scale. [...]"

Source: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Authors: Andrew C. Ross, Charles A. Stock
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecss.2019.03.007

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Limited oxygen production in the Mesoarchean ocean

Abstract.

"The Archean Eon was a time of predominantly anoxic Earth surface conditions, where anaerobic processes controlled bioessential element cycles. In contrast to “oxygen oases” well documented for the Neoarchean [2.8 to 2.5 billion years ago (Ga)], the magnitude, spatial extent, and underlying causes of possible Mesoarchean (3.2 to 2.8 Ga) surface-ocean oxygenation remain controversial. [...]"

Source: PNAS
Authors: Frantz Ossa Ossa et al.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1818762116

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The influence of decadal oscillations on the oxygen and nutrient trends in the Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"A strong oxygen deficient layer is located in the upper layer of the tropical Pacific Ocean and at deeper depths in the North Pacific. Processes related to climate change (upper ocean warming, reduced ventilation) are expected to change ocean oxygen and nutrient inventories. In most ocean basins, a decrease in oxygen (‘deoxygenation’) and an increase of nutrients has been observed in subsurface layers. Deoxygenation trends are not linear and there could be other influences on oxygen and nutrient trends and variability. Here oxygen and nutrient time series since 1950 in the Pacific Ocean were investigated at 50 to 300 m depth, as this layer provides critical pelagic habitat for biological communities. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Lothar Stramma et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-2019-91

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