News

Source partitioning of oxygen-consuming organic matter in the hypoxic zone of the Chesapeake Bay

Abstract.

"We surveyed the carbonate system along the main channel of the Chesapeake Bay in June 2016 to elucidate carbonate dynamics and the associated sources of oxygen‐consuming organic matter. Using a two endmember mixing calculation, chemical proxies, and stoichiometry, we demonstrated that in early summer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) dynamics were controlled by aerobic respiration in the water column (43%), sulfate reduction in the sediment (39%), atmospheric CO2 invasion (13%), and CaCO3 dissolution (5%). A mass balance of the DIC concentration and its stable isotope suggested that the apparent δ13C of oxygen‐consuming[...]"

 

Source: Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography
Authors: Jianzhong Su et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11419

Read the full article here.


Chromium reduction and associated stable isotope fractionation restricted to anoxic shelf waters in the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

Abstract.

"The marine chromium (Cr) cycle is still insufficiently understood, in particular the mechanisms modulating the spatial distribution of dissolved stable Cr isotopes in seawater. Redox transformations between its main oxidation states, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), have been held accountable for the observed tight inverse logarithmic relationship between the dissolved Cr concentration [Cr] and its isotopic composition (δ53Cr), whereby isotopically light Cr(III) is removed in surface waters and oxygen minimum zones[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Philipp Nasemann et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2020.06.027

Read the full article here.


Organic Carbon Export and Loss Rates in the Red Sea

Abstract.

"The export and fate of organic carbon in the mesopelagic zone are still poorly understood and quantified due to lack of observations. We exploited data from a biogeochemical‐Argo float that was deployed in the Red Sea to study how a warm and hypoxic environment can affect the fate of the organic carbon in the ocean's interior. We observed that only 10% of the particulate organic carbon (POC) exported survived at depth due to remineralization processes[...]"

 

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: Malika Kheireddine et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GB006650

Read the full article here.


Increasing ocean stratification over the past half-century

Abstract.

"Seawater generally forms stratified layers with lighter waters near the surface and denser waters at greater depth. This stable configuration acts as a barrier to water mixing that impacts the efficiency of vertical exchanges of heat, carbon, oxygen and other constituents. Previous quantification of stratification change has been limited to simple differencing of surface and 200-m depth changes and has neglected the spatial complexity of ocean density change. Here, we quantify changes in ocean stratification down[...]"

 

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Guancheng Li  et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00918-2

Read the full article here.


Biogeochemical Controls on the Redox Evolution of Earth`s Oceans and Atmosphere

Abstract.

"The redox state of Earth’s atmosphere has undergone a dramatic shift over geologic time from reducing to strongly oxidizing, and this shift has been coupled with changes in ocean redox structure and the size and activity of Earth’s biosphere. Delineating this evolutionary trajectory remains a major problem in Earth system science. Significant insights have emerged through the application of redox-sensitive geochemical systems. Existing and emerging biogeochemical modeling tools are pushing the limits of the quantitative constraints on ocean–atmosphere[...]"


Source: Elements
Authors: Christopher T. Reinhard et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/gselements.16.3.191

Read the full article here.


Rapid transfer of oxygen to the deep ocean mediated by bubbles

Abstract.

"The concentration of oxygen exerts major controls on life in the ocean, and its distribution in the ocean and atmosphere carries information about biological productivity, transports of mass and heat, ocean deoxygenation and global carbon sinks. Our understanding of processes underlying oxygen distributions, their key features and variability is often lacking. Here we investigate the magnitude, variability and uncertainty of the air–sea flux of oxygen, carbon dioxide and atmospheric potential oxygen over an annual cycle in the Labrador Sea. We demonstrate that two-thirds of the annual oxygen uptake occurs over only 40 days in winter and is associated with a bubble-mediated component[...]"

 

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: D. Atamanchuk et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-0532-2

Read the full article here.


Benthic fluxes of oxygen and heat from a seasonally hypoxic region of Saanich Inlet fjord observed by eddy covariance

Abstract.

"Benthic habitats within fjords are predominantly insulated from the high energy physical dynamics of open coastlines. As a result, fjords may have atypical mass and heat transfer rates at the seafloor. This study presents aquatic eddy covariance (EC) measurements made continuously from late May 2013 through December 2013, in Saanich Inlet fjord, British Columbia, to assess areal-averaged benthic fluxes of dissolved oxygen and heat, and their relationships to bottom boundary layer dynamics and water properties. The measurements were achieved by the connection of a system of underwater EC sensors to Ocean Network Canada's Victoria Experimental Network Under the Sea (VENUS) observatory that has a primary seafloor node[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Clare E. Reimers et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2020.106815

Read the full article here.


Factors controlling plankton community production, export flux, and particulate matter stoichiometry in the coastal upwelling system off Peru

Abstract.

"Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are among the most productive marine ecosystems on Earth. The production of organic material is fueled by upwelling of nutrient-rich deep waters and high incident light at the sea surface. However, biotic and abiotic factors can modify surface production and related biogeochemical processes. Determining these factors is important because EBUS are considered hotspots of climate change, and reliable predictions of their future functioning requires understanding of the mechanisms driving the biogeochemical cycles therein. In this field experiment, we used in situ mesocosms as tools to improve our mechanistic understanding of processes controlling organic matter cycling in the coastal Peruvian upwelling system.[...]"

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Lennart Thomas Bach et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4831-2020

Read the full article here.

 


Recovery from multi-millennial natural costal hypoxia in the Stockholm Archipelago, Baltic Sea, terminated by modern human activity

Abstract.

"Enhanced nutrient input and warming have led to the development of low oxygen (hypoxia) in coastal waters globally. For many coastal areas, insight into redox conditions prior to human impact is lacking. Here, we reconstructed bottom water redox conditions and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the coastal Stockholm Archipelago over the past 3000 yr. Elevated sedimentary concentrations of molybdenum indicate (seasonal) hypoxia between 1000 b.c.e. and 1500 c.e. Biomarker[...]"

 

Source: Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography
Authors: Niels A. G. M. van Helmond et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11575

Read the full article here.

 


Potential effects of deep seabed mining on pelagic and benthopelagic biota

Abstract.

"Environmental concerns were raised from the very onset of discussions concerning the extraction of metalliferous ores from the deep sea, but most studies have targeted the expected impacts on the benthic communities only. The first section of this study compiles possible impacts of deep seabed mining activities on pelagic organisms. Several processes of mining-related activities were identified that can potentially affect the pelagic environment. Some of these processes will assumedly have only minor effects on the pelagic and benthopelagic communities, for example substrate removal and deposition of material.[...]"

 

Source: Science Direct
Authors: Bernd Christiansen et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.02.014

Read the full article here.

 


Showing 81 - 90 of 843 results.
Items per Page 10
of 85