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Ecology and evolution of seafloor and subseafloor microbial communities

Abstract.

"Vast regions of the dark ocean have ultra-slow rates of organic matter sedimentation, and their sediments are oxygenated to great depths yet have low levels of organic matter and cells. Primary production in the oxic seabed is supported by ammonia-oxidizing archaea, whereas in anoxic sediments, novel, uncultivated groups have the potential to produce H2 and CH4, which fuel anaerobic carbon fixation. [...]"

Source: Nature Reviews Microbiology
Authors: William D. Orsi
DOI: 10.1038/s41579-018-0046-8

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Early Palaeozoic ocean anoxia and global warming driven by the evolution of shallow burrowing

Abstract.

"The evolution of burrowing animals forms a defining event in the history of the Earth. It has been hypothesised that the expansion of seafloor burrowing during the Palaeozoic altered the biogeochemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. However, whilst potential impacts of bioturbation on the individual phosphorus, oxygen and sulphur cycles have been considered, combined effects have not been investigated, leading to major uncertainty over the timing and magnitude of the Earth system response to the evolution of bioturbation. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Sebastiaan van de Velde et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-04973-4

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Enhanced carbon-sulfur cycling in the sediments of Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone center

Abstract.

"Biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) sediments, which are characterized by high input of labile organic matter, have crucial bearings on the benthic biota, gas and metal fluxes across the sediment-water interface, and carbon-sulfur cycling. Here we couple pore-fluid chemistry and comprehensive microbial diversity data to reveal the sedimentary carbon-sulfur cycle across a water-depth transect covering the entire thickness of eastern Arabian Sea OMZ, off the west coast of India. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Svetlana Fernandes et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-27002-2

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Biogeochemical role of subsurface coherent eddies in the ocean: Tracer cannonballs, hypoxic storms, and microbial stewpots?

Abstract.

"Subsurface coherent eddies are well-known features of ocean circulation, but the sparsity of observations prevents an assessment of their importance for biogeochemistry. Here, we use a global eddying (0.1° ) ocean-biogeochemical model to carry out a census of subsurface coherent eddies originating from eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS), and quantify their biogeochemical effects as they propagate westward into the subtropical gyres.  [...]"

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: Ivy Frenge et al.
DOI: 10.1002/2017GB005743


Marine N2O emissions from nitrification [...] constrained by modern observations and projected in multi-millennial global warming simula

Abstract.

"Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) and ozone destructing agent, yet, global estimates of N2O emissions are uncertain. Marine N2O stems from nitrification and denitrification processes which depend on organic matter cycling and dissolved oxygen (O2). We introduce N2O as an obligate intermediate product of denitrification and as an O2-dependent byproduct from nitrification in the Bern3D ocean model. [...]"

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: G. Battaglia, F. Joos
DOI: 10.1002/2017GB005671

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Diverse Marinimicrobia bacteria may mediate coupled biogeochemical cycles along eco-thermodynamic gradients

Abstract.

"Microbial communities drive biogeochemical cycles through networks of metabolite exchange that are structured along energetic gradients. As energy yields become limiting, these networks favor co-metabolic interactions to maximize energy disequilibria. Here we apply single-cell genomics, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics to study bacterial populations of the abundant “microbial dark matter” phylum Marinimicrobia along defined energy gradients. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Alyse K. Hawley et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01376-9

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A dynamic microbial community with high functional redundancy inhabits the cold, oxic subseafloor aquifer

Abstract.

"The rock-hosted subseafloor crustal aquifer harbors a reservoir of microbial life that may influence global marine biogeochemical cycles. Here we utilized metagenomic libraries of crustal fluid samples from North Pond, located on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a site with cold, oxic subseafloor fluid circulation within the upper basement to query microbial diversity. [...]"

Source: The ISME Journal
Authors: Benjamin J. Tully et al.
DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2017.187

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Impacts of El Niño events on the Peruvian upwelling system productivity

Abstract.

"Every 2–7 years, El Niño events trigger a strong decrease in phytoplankton productivity off Peru, which profoundly alters the environmental landscape and trophic chain of the marine ecosystem. Here we use a regional coupled physical-biogeochemical model to study the dynamical processes involved in the productivity changes during El Nino, with a focus on the strongest events of the 1958–2008 period. Model evaluation using satellite and in situ observations shows that the model reproduces the surface and subsurface interannual physical and biogeochemical variability. [...]"

Source: Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Authors: D. Espinoza-Morriberón
DOI: 10.1002/2016JC012439

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Spatial Patterns of Groundwater Biogeochemical Reactivity in an Intertidal Beach Aquifer

Abstract.

"Beach aquifers host a dynamic and reactive mixing zone between fresh and saline groundwater of contrasting origin and composition. Seawater, driven up the beachface by waves and tides, infiltrates into the aquifer and meets the seaward-discharging fresh groundwater, creating and maintaining a reactive intertidal circulation cell. Within the cell, land-derived nutrients delivered by fresh groundwater are transformed or attenuated. We investigated this process by collecting porewater samples from multi-level wells along a shore-perpendicular transect on a beach near Cape Henlopen, Delaware and analyzing solute and particulate concentrations. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Kyra H. Kim
DOI: 10.1002/2017JG003943

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Widespread seawater circulation in 18–22 Ma oceanic crust: Impact on heat flow and sediment geochemistry

Abstract.

"On the basis of heat-flow measurements, seismic mapping, and sediment pore-water analysis, we demonstrate widespread and efficient ventilation of the 18–22 Ma oceanic crust of the northeast equatorial Pacific Ocean. Recharge and discharge appear to be associated with basement outcrops, including seamounts and north-south–trending faults, along which sediment cover thins out and volcanic rocks are exposed. Low-temperature hydrothermal circulation through the volcanic crust leads to the reduction of heat flow through overlying sediments, with measured heat-flow values that are well below those expected from conductive cooling curves for lithosphere of this age. [...]"

Source: Geology
Authors: Thomas Kuhn et al.
DOI: 10.1130/G39091.1

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