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Ocean deoxygenation : everyone’s problem

Abstract.

"The ocean represents 97% of the physical habitable space on the planet and is central to sustaining all life on Earth. Since 2000 significant and dedicated effort has been directed at raising awareness and understanding of the consequences of greenhouse gas emissions on the ocean. Carbon dioxide emitted by human activities is driving the ocean towards more acidic conditions. Only in the past decade has it started to become more widely recognized that the temperature of the global ocean is also being significantly affected as a result of the effect that the carbon dioxide and other potent greenhouse gases are having in the Earth’s atmosphere. [...]"

Source: IUCN
Authors: D. Laffoley and J. M. Baxter
DOI: 10.2305/IUCN.CH.2019.13.en

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Article Open Access Published: 29 November 2019 Role of synoptic activity on projected changes in upwelling-favourable winds at the ocean’s eastern bo

Abstract.

"The climate of the ocean’s eastern boundaries is strongly influenced by subtropical anticyclones, which drive a surface wind stress that promotes coastal upwelling of nutrient-rich subsurface water that supports high primary productivity and an abundance of food resources. Understanding the projected response of upwelling-favourable winds to climate change has broad implications for coastal biogeochemistry, ecology, and fisheries. [...]"

Source: npj Climate and Atmospheric Science
Authors: Catalina Aguirre et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41612-019-0101-9

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Large projected decline in dissolved oxygen in a eutrophic estuary due to climate change

Abstract.

"Climate change is known to cause deoxygenation in the open ocean, but its effects on eutrophic and seasonally hypoxic estuaries and coastal oceans are less clear. Using Chesapeake Bay as a study site, we conducted climate downscaling projections for dissolved oxygen and found that the hypoxic and anoxic volumes would increase by 10‐30% between the late 20th and mid‐21st century. [...]"

Source: JGR Oceans
Authors: Wenfei Ni et al. 
DOI: 10.1029/2019JC015274

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Meeting climate targets by direct CO2 injections: what price would the ocean have to pay?

Abstract.

"We investigate the climate mitigation potential and collateral effects of direct injections of captured CO2 into the deep ocean as a possible means to close the gap between an intermediate CO2 emissions scenario and a specific temperature target, such as the 1.5 C target aimed for by the Paris Agreement. For that purpose, a suite of approaches for controlling the amount of direct CO2 injections at 3000 m water depth are implemented in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. [...]"

Source: Earth System Dynamics
Authors: Fabian Reith et al.
DOI: 10.5194/esd-10-711-2019

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Oceanic organic carbon as a possible first-order control on the carbon cycle during the Bathonian–Callovian

Abstract.

"Oceans are the largest, readily exchangeable, superficial carbon reservoir; a current challenge in investigating past and present environments and predict future evolution relates to the role of oceanic carbon in regulating Earths' carbon cycle and climate. At least one paired δ13Ccarb-TOC decoupling event is noted in the Late Bathonian–Early Callovian. [...]"

Source: Global and Planetary Change
Authors: Ricardo L.Silva et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2019.103058


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Defining CO2 and O2 syndromes of marine biomes in the Anthropocene

Abstract.

"Research efforts have intensified to foresee the prospects for marine biomes under climate change and anthropogenic drivers over varying temporal and spatial scales. Parallel with these efforts is the utilization of terminology, such as ‘ocean acidification’ and ‘ocean deoxygenation’, that can foster rapid comprehension of complex processes driving carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) concentrations in the global ocean and thus, are now widely used in discussions within and beyond academia. [...]"

Source: Global Change Biology
Authors: Shannon G. Klein et al.
DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14879

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Ocean-Atmosphere Observations in Philippine Sea by Moored Buoy

Abstract.

"Offequatorial extension of equatorial buoy arrays such as Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON) buoy array is required to monitor global and regional climates. On December 3, 2016, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) deployed a moored buoy (Ph buoy) at 13°N, 137° E in the Philippine Sea and are measuring temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentration from the sea surface to 300 m and atmospheric parameters. [...]"

Source: MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Oceans (OTO), 2018 OCEANS
Authors: Akira Nagano  et al.
DOI: 10.1109/OCEANSKOBE.2018.8558886

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Using machine learning to understand climate change

"Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture.

To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the atmosphere’s methane cycle. They need to know the size of the inputs—both natural and human—as well as the outputs. They also need to know how long methane resides in the atmosphere.

To help develop this understanding, Tom Weber, an assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester; undergraduate researcher Nicola Wiseman ’18, now a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine; and their colleague Annette Kock at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Germany, used data science to determine how much methane is emitted from the ocean into the atmosphere each year.  [...]"

Source: University of Rochester

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Researchers find global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

"Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture.

To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the atmosphere's methane cycle. They need to know the size of the inputs—both natural and human—as well as the outputs. They also need to know how long methane resides in the atmosphere. [...]"

Source: Phys.org

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Global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

Abstract.

"Oceanic emissions represent a highly uncertain term in the natural atmospheric methane (CH4) budget, due to the sparse sampling of dissolved CH4 in the marine environment. Here we overcome this limitation by training machine-learning models to map the surface distribution of methane disequilibrium (∆CH4). Our approach yields a global diffusive CH4 flux of 2–6TgCH4yr−1 from the ocean to the atmosphere, after propagating uncertainties in ∆CH4 and gas transfer velocity.  [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Thomas Weber, Nicola A. Wiseman & Annette Kock 
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12541-7

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