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Mangrove-Derived Organic and Inorganic Carbon Exchanges Between the Sinnamary Estuarine System

Abstract.

"There is growing evidence that a substantial fraction of the dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can be exported from mangroves to the ocean. Yet our understanding of C fluxes in mangrove forests is limited to only few regional studies that exclude the world's longest sediment dispersal system connected to the Amazon River. The present study aims at (1) examining tidal fluctuations of DOC, POC, and DIC; their isotopes; and optical properties such as chromophoric dissolved organic matter[...]"


Source: Advancing Earth And Space Science
Authors: Raghab Ray et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JG005739

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Can ocean community production and respiration be determined by measuring high-frequency oxygen profiles from autonomous floats?

Abstract.

"Oceanic primary production forms the basis of the marine food web and provides a pathway for carbon sequestration. Despite its importance, spatial and temporal variations of primary production are poorly observed, in large part because the traditional measurement techniques are laborious and require the presence of a ship. More efficient methods are emerging that take advantage of miniaturized sensors integrated into autonomous platforms such as gliders and profiling floats. One such method relies on determining the diurnal cycle of dissolved oxygen in the mixed layer and has been applied successfully to measurements from gliders and mixed-layer floats. [...]”

 

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Christopher Gordon et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-17-41110.5194

 

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Macroalgal metabolism and lateral carbon flows can create significant carbon sinks

Abstract.

"Macroalgal beds have drawn attention as one of the vegetated coastal ecosystems that act as atmospheric CO2 sinks. Although macroalgal metabolism as well as inorganic and organic carbon flows are important pathways for CO2 uptake by macroalgal beds, the relationships between macroalgal metabolism and associated carbon flows are still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated carbon flows, including air–water CO2 exchange and budgets of dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), in a temperate macroalgal bed during the productive months of the year. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Auhtors: Kenta Watanabe et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-17-2425-2020

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Carbon cycling in the world's deepest blue hole

Abstract.

"Blue holes are unique geomorphological features with steep biogeochemical gradients and distinctive microbial communities. Carbon cycling in blue holes, however, remains poorly understood. Here we describe potential mechanisms of dissolved carbon cycling in the world's deepest blue hole, the Yongle Blue Hole (YBH), which was recently discovered in the South China Sea. In the YBH, we found some of the lowest concentrations (e.g., 22 μM) and oldest ages (e.g., 6,810 years BP) of dissolved organic carbon, as well as the highest concentrations (e.g., 3,090 μM) and the oldest ages (e.g., 8270 years BP) of dissolved inorganic carbon observed in oceanic waters. [...]"

Source: JGR Biogeosciences
Authors: P. Yao et al.
DOI: 10.1029/2019JG005307

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Spatiotemporal changes of ocean carbon species in the western North Pacific using parameterization technique

Abstract.

"We constructed parameterizations for the estimation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH in the western North Pacific, including Japanese coastal regions. Parameterizations, determined as a function of potential temperature (θ) and dissolved oxygen (DO), provided strong correlations with direct measurements for DIC [the coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.99; the root mean square error (RMSE) = 8.49 µmol kg−1] and pH (R2 = 0.98, RMSE = 0.030). [...]"

Source: Journal of Oceanography
Authors: Yutaka W. Watanabe et al.
DOI: 10.1007/s10872-019-00532-7

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