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Editorial: Drivers and consequences of ocean deoxygenation in tropical ecosystems

Abstract.

"Coastal habitats are under increasing anthropogenic pressures that jeopardize the survival and persistence of ecologically important marine life. One such stressor, increasingly recognized as a significant threat to marine coastal habitats, is deoxygenation (Breitburg et al., 2018; IPCC, 2023). The United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development has identified deoxygenation as a top international priority for ocean research, with efforts being led by the Global Ocean Oxygen Network (GO2NE) and affiliated programs (Global Ocean Oxygen Decade program). [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Maggie D. Johnson et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2024.1425902

Read the full article here.


Climate, Oxygen, and the Future of Marine Biodiversity

Abstract.

"The ocean enabled the diversification of life on Earth by adding O2 to the atmosphere, yet marine species remain most subject to O2 limitation. Human industrialization is intensifying the aerobic challenges to marine ecosystems by depleting the ocean's O2 inventory through the global addition of heat and local addition of nutrients. Historical observations reveal an ∼2% decline in upper-ocean O2 and accelerating reports of coastal mass mortality events. The dynamic balance of O2 supply and demand provides a unifying framework for understanding these phenomena across scales from the global ocean to individual organisms. [...]".

 

Source: Annual Review of Marine Science
Authors: Curtis Deutsch et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-040323-095231

Read the full article here.


High-frequency dynamics of pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature in the coastal ecosystems of the Tanga-Pemba Seascape...

Full title: "High-frequency dynamics of pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature in the coastal ecosystems of the Tanga-Pemba Seascape: implications for upwelling-enhanced ocean acidification and deoxygenation"

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification, deoxygenation, and warming are three interconnected global change challenges caused by increased anthropogenic carbon emissions. These issues present substantial threats to marine organisms, ecosystems, and the survival of coastal communities depending on these ecosystems. Coastal upwelling areas may experience significant [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Rushingisha George et al. 
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1286870

Read the full article here.


Ocean deoxygenation caused non-linear responses in the structure and functioning of benthic ecosystems

Abstract.

"The O2 content of the global ocean has been declining progressively over the past decades, mainly because of human activities and global warming. Nevertheless, how long-term deoxygenation affects macrobenthic communities, sediment biogeochemistry and their mutual feedback remains poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the response of the benthic assemblages and biogeochemical functioning to decreasing O2 concentrations along the persistent bottom-water dissolved O2 gradient of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (QC, Canada). [...]".

 

Source: Wiley Online Library
Authors: Ludovic Pascal et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.16994

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Development of a high-resolution marine ecosystem model for predicting the combined impacts of ocean acidification and deoxygenation

Abstract.

"An approach was developed to help evaluate and predict the combined effects of ocean acidification and deoxygenation on calcifying organisms along the coast of Japan. The Coastal and Regional Ocean COmmunity (CROCO) modeling system was set up to couple the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to the Pelagic Interaction Scheme for Carbon and Ecosystem Studies (PISCES) biogeochemical model and used to reproduce physical and biochemical processes in the area around Miyako Bay, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. [...]".

 

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Lawrence Patrick C. Bernardo et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1174892

Read the full article here.


A Selected Review of Impacts of Ocean Deoxygenation on Fish and Fisheries

Abstract.

"Oxygen is crucial for the survival of marine species. Yet, the ocean has experienced a loss of approximately 2% of its oxygen inventory since the last century, resulting in adverse impacts on marine life and ecosystems. In particular, changes in the gap between the supply and demand for dissolved oxygen lead to physiological and ecological variations, which cause alterations in habitats and food webs for fish and ecosystem services. These changes vary over time and by region, and the heterogeneous characteristics of marine species bring about non-linear consequences to human society. [...]".

 

Source: MDPI
Authors: Hongsik Kim et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8060316

Read the full article here. 


Oxygen dynamics in marine productive ecosystems at ecologically relevant scales

Abstract.

"The decline of dissolved oxygen in the oceans could be detrimental to marine life and biogeochemical cycles. However, predicting future oxygen availability with models that mainly focus on temporal and spatial large-scale mean values could lead to incorrect predictions. Marine ecosystems are strongly influenced by short temporal- and small spatial-scale oxygen fluctuations. Large-scale modelling neglects fluctuations, which include the pervasive occurrence of high oxygen supersaturation on a daily time scale in productive ecosystems such as coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangrove forests and the spatial heterogeneity in oxygen availability at microclimatic scales. [...]".

 

Source: Nature
Authors: Folco Giomi et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-023-01217-z

Read the full article here.


Aquatic Productivity under Multiple Stressors

Abstract. 

"Aquatic ecosystems are responsible for about 50% of global productivity. They mitigate climate change by taking up a substantial fraction of anthropogenically emitted CO2 and sink part of it into the deep ocean. Productivity is controlled by a number of environmental factors, such as water temperature, ocean acidification, nutrient availability, deoxygenation and exposure to solar UV radiation. Recent studies have revealed that these factors may interact to yield additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects. While ocean warming and deoxygenation are supposed to affect mitochondrial respiration oppositely [...]".

 

Source: MDPI
Authors: Donat-P. Häder & Kunshan Gao
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/w15040817

Read the full article here.


Marine bioturbation collapse during Early Jurassic deoxygenation: implications for post-extinction marine ecosystem functioning

Abstract. 

"Climate change is undermining the health and integrity of seafloor ecosystems, with declines in bioturbation expected to impact future ecosystem functioning. We explored changes in the nature and degree of bioturbation during Early Jurassic global warming and ocean deoxygenation. Understanding how these communities responded can help anticipate how bioturbation and ecosystem functioning might change over large spatial and temporal scales. Trace and body fossils from outcrop and core in the Cleveland Basin, UK show how healthy seafloor communities deteriorated through the Pliensbachian spinatum Zone, and macroinfaunal behaviour [...]".

 

Source: Geological Society of London
Authors: Bryony A. Caswell & Liam Herringshaw
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1144/SP529-2022-226

Read the full article here.


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