News

When microbiologists plunge into the ocean

Microbiologists stake their claim: assessing climate change involves new ways of studying the ocean’s microbes.

"Microbiology wants in. No longer should microbes and microbial processes be left out of climate change assessments, state 33 researchers from nine countries in their consensus statement1, “Scientists’ warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change.” There’s a “need to act,” the authors write. By underappreciating the importance of microbial processes both on land and in the oceans, “we fundamentally limit our understanding of Earth’s biosphere and response to climate change and thus jeopardize efforts to create an environmentally sustainable future.” [...]"

Source: Nature Methods 
Authors: Vivien Marx
DOI: 10.1038/s41592-020-0736-9

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Environmental controls on bacteriohopanepolyol profiles of benthic microbial mats from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

Abstract.

"Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are pentacyclic triterpenoid lipids that contribute to the structural integrity and physiology of some bacteria. Because some BHPs originate from specific classes of bacteria, BHPs have potential as taxonomically and environmentally diagnostic biomarkers. For example, a stereoisomer of bacteriohopanetetrol (informally BHT II) has been associated with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria and suboxic to anoxic marine environments where anammox is active. [...]"

Source: geobiology
Authors: Emily D. Matys et al.
DOI: 10.1111/gbi.12353

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Bacterial fermentation and respiration processes are uncoupled in anoxic permeable sediments

Abstract.

"Permeable (sandy) sediments cover half of the continental margin and are major regulators of oceanic carbon cycling. The microbial communities within these highly dynamic sediments frequently shift between oxic and anoxic states, and hence are less stratified than those in cohesive (muddy) sediments. A major question is, therefore, how these communities maintain metabolism during oxic–anoxic transitions. [...]"

Source: Nature Microbiology
Authors: Adam J. Kessler et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41564-019-0391-z

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