News

Spatial variations in sedimentary N-transformation rates in the North Sea (German Bight)

Abstract.

"In this study, we investigate the role of sedimentary N cycling in the southern North Sea. We present a budget of ammonification, nitrification and sedimentary NO−3 consumption and denitrification in contrasting sediment types of the German Bight (southern North Sea), including novel net ammonification rates. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Alexander Bratek et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-17-2839-2020

Read the full article here.


Changing perspectives in marine nitrogen fixation

Abstract.

"Biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation, the reduction of atmospheric N2 to ammonia, is important for maintaining the fertility of the oceans by providing biologically useful nitrogen to support primary organic matter production (i.e., carbon dioxide fixation). N2 fixation offsets the removal of combined nitrogen by microbial denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and export to the deep sea. For several decades, there has been a lack of consensus as to whether losses of N through microbial removal pathways are balanced by biological nitrogen fixation, along with other inputs such as atmospheric nitrogen deposition and terrestrial runoff. [...]"

Source: Science
Authors: Jonathan P. Zehr1 and Douglas G. Capone
DOI: 10.1126/science.aay9514

Read the full article here.


Shedding New Light on the Nitrogen Cycle in the Dark Ocean

"Every year, the Mississippi River dumps around 1.4 million metric tons of nitrogen into the Gulf of Mexico, much of it runoff from agricultural fertilizer. This nitrogen can lead to algal blooms, which in turn deplete oxygen concentrations in the water, creating hypoxic dead zones. The nitrogen cycle is a phenomenon environmental scientists would really like to understand better. “As humans, we do put a lot of reactive nitrogen compounds into the ocean, especially in coastal regions, by…river runoff,” said Katharina Kitzinger of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany. “It’s really crucial to understand how microbes turn over this excess nitrogen that we put into the environment. [...]”"

Read the full article here


Autotrophic Carbon Fixation Pathways Along the Redox Gradient in Oxygen‐Depleted Oceanic Waters

Abstract.

"Anoxic marine zones (AMZs), also known as ‘oxygen‐deficient zones’, contribute to the loss of fixed nitrogen from the ocean by anaerobic microbial processes. While these microbial processes associated with the nitrogen cycle have been extensively studied, those linked to the carbon cycle in AMZs have received much less attention, particularly the autotrophic carbon fixation —a crucial component of the carbon cycle. [...]"

Source: Environmental Microbiology Reports
Authors: Paula Ruiz‐Fernández et al.
DOI: 10.1111/1758-2229.12837

Read the full article here.


Invasive ecosystem engineers threaten benthic nitrogen cycling by altering native infaunal and biofouling communities

Abstract.

"Predicting the effects of invasive ecosystem engineering species in new bioregions has proved elusive. In part this is because separating biological effects from purely physical mechanisms has been little studied and yet could help predict potentially damaging bioinvasions. Here we tested the effects of a large bio-engineering fanworm Sabella spallanzanii (Sabella) versus worm-like structures (mimics) on gas and nutrient fluxes in a marine soft bottom sediment. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: L. W. Tait et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-58557-8

Read the full article here.


Changes in oxygen concentrations in our ocean can disrupt fundamental biological cycles

"New research led by scientists at the University of Bristol has shown that the feedback mechanisms that were thought to keep the marine nitrogen cycle relatively stable over geological time can break down when oxygen levels in the ocean decline significantly.

The nitrogen cycle is essential to all forms of life on Earth - nitrogen is a basic building block of DNA.The marine nitrogen cycle is strongly controlled by biology and small changes in the marine nitrogen cycle have major implications on life. [...]"

Source: University of Bristol

Read the full article here.


Fundamentally different global marine nitrogen cycling in response to severe ocean deoxygenation

Abstract.

"The present-day marine nitrogen (N) cycle is strongly regulated by biology. Deficiencies in the availability of fixed and readily bioavailable nitrogen relative to phosphate (P) in the surface ocean are largely corrected by the activity of diazotrophs. This feedback system, termed the “nitrostat,” is thought to have provided close regulation of fixed-N speciation and inventory relative to P since the Proterozoic. [...]"

Source: PNAS
Authors: B. David A. Naafs et al.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1905553116

Read the full article here.


Stable aerobic and anaerobic coexistence in anoxic marine zones

Abstract.

"Mechanistic description of the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is necessary for diagnostic and predictive modeling of fixed nitrogen loss in anoxic marine zones (AMZs). In a metabolic model where diverse oxygen- and nitrogen-cycling microbial metabolisms are described by underlying redox chemical reactions, we predict a transition from strictly aerobic to predominantly anaerobic regimes as the outcome of ecological interactions along an oxygen gradient, obviating the need for prescribed critical oxygen concentrations. [...]"

Source: The ISME Journal 
Authors: Emily J. Zakem et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41396-019-0523-8

Read the full article here.


Anaerobic nitrogen cycling on a Neoarchaean ocean margin

Abstract.

"A persistently aerobic marine nitrogen cycle featuring the biologically mediated oxidation of ammonium to nitrate has likely been in place since the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) some 2.3 billion years ago. Although nitrogen isotope data from some Neoarchaean sediments suggests transient nitrate availability prior to the GOE, these data are open to other interpretations. [...]"

Source: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Authors: C.Mettam et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2019.115800

Read the full article here.


Quantifying the Relative Importance of Riverine and Open‐Ocean Nitrogen Sources for Hypoxia Formation in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

Abstract.

"The Mississippi and Atchafalaya River System discharges large amounts of freshwater and nutrients into the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGoM). These lead to increased stratification and elevate primary production in the outflow region. Consequently, hypoxia (oxygen <62.5 mmol/m3), extending over an area of roughly 15,000 km2, forms every summer in bottom waters. [...]"

Source: JGR Oceans
Authors: Fabian Große et al.
DOI: 10.1029/2019JC015230

Read the full article here.


Showing 1 - 10 of 13 results.
Items per Page 10
of 2