News

Multi‐Century Impacts of Ice Sheet Retreat on Sea Level and Ocean Tides in Hudson Bay

Abstract.

"Past and modern large‐scale ice sheet loss results in geographically variable sea level changes. At present, in Hudson Bay, Canada, sea level is decreasing due to glacial isostatic adjustment, which represents a departure from the globally averaged sea level rise. However, there are large uncertainties in future sea level trends with further polar ice sheet retreat in the coming centuries. Sea level changes affect ocean tides considerably because tides are highly sensitive to changes in bathymetry. Here, we present multi‐century sea level projections associated with a suite of past and future ice loss scenarios and consider the impact of these changes on ocean tides[...]"

Source: Advancing Earth and Space Science
Authors: A.‐M. Hayden et al.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015104

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New Webinar Series on Ocean Deoxygenation

New Webinar Series on Ocean Deoxygenation
Do you want to know more about deoxygenation in the ocean?
Join us for the upcoming webinar!

The Global Ocean Oxygen Network (IOC Expert Working Group GO2NE) starts a new series on ocean deoxygenation. The first webinar will take place 11 November 2020. The speakers will present latest science on the impacts of reduced oxygen in the open ocean and coastal zones. Each webinar will feature two presentations by a more senior and an earlier-career scientist, 20 minutes each followed by 10 minutes moderated discussion sessions.

When? Wednesday, 11th November 2020, 14:00 h – 15:00 h CET

To register please click here.


Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability

Abstract.

"Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from the Redfield ratio, the molar ratio of oxygen to organic carbon consumed during respiration (i.e., the respiration quotient, r −O2:C  r−O2:C ) is consistently assumed constant but rarely, if ever, measured. Using a prognostic[...]"

 

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Authors: Allison R. Moreno et al.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004986117

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Ocean acidification could doom key Arctic fish species: study

Ocean acidification combined with warming of the world oceans and loss of oxygen is having a severe impact on key Arctic marine species such as polar cod in the Barents Sea, according to a new study conducted by German scientists.

 

"The eight-year interdisciplinary study, which began in 2009 and involved more than 250 scientist in the German research network on ocean acidification BIOACID (Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification), investigated how different marine species respond to ocean acidification – a change in the ocean chemistry that occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere dissolves in seawater.

In addition to ocean acidification, the study, Exploring Ocean Change: Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification, also examined the cascading effect of other stressors such as ocean warming, deoxygenation, overfishing and eutrophication – the increased concentration of nutrients in estuaries and coastal waters that causes harmful algal blooms, ocean dead zones and fish kills. [...]"

Source: The Independent Barents Observer

Read the full article here.