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Organic Heterogeneities in Foraminiferal Calcite Traced Through the Distribution of N, S, and I Measured With NanoSIMS:

A New Challenge for Element-Ratio-Based Paleoproxies?

 

Abstract.

"Oceanic oxygen decline due to anthropogenic climate change is a matter of growing concern. A quantitative oxygen proxy is highly desirable in order to identify and monitor recent dynamics as well as to reconstruct pre-Anthropocene changes in amplitude and extension of oxygen depletion. Geochemical proxies like foraminiferal I/Ca ratios seem to be promising redox proxies. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Earth Science
Authors: Nicolaas Glock et al.
DOI: 10.3389/feart.2019.00175

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Chromium isotope cycling in the water column and sediments of the Peruvian continental margin

Abstract.

"Chromium (Cr) isotope fractionation is sensitive to redox changes and the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr) of sedimentary rocks has been used to reconstruct marine redox conditions and atmospheric oxygenation in the past. However, little is known about the behaviour of chromium isotopes across modern marine redox boundaries. We investigated Cr concentrations and δ53Cr variations in seawater and sediment across the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to provide a better understanding of Cr cycling in the ocean. [...]"

Source: Geochimica et Cosmochimica
Authors: S. Bruggmann et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.gca.2019.05.001

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Diapycnal dissolved organic matter supply into the upper Peruvian oxycline

Abstract.

"The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) hosts the Peruvian upwelling system, which represents one of the most productive areas in the world ocean. High primary production followed by rapid heterotrophic utilization of organic matter supports the formation of one of the most intense oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the world ocean, where dissolved oxygen (O2) concentrations reach less than 1 µmol kg−1. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Alexandra N. Loginova et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-2033-2019

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Latitudinal variations in δ30Si and δ15N signatures along the Peruvian shelf: quantifying the effects of nutrient utilization versus denitrification..

..over the past 600 years

Abstract.

"The stable sedimentary nitrogen isotope compositions of bulk organic matter (δ15Nbulk) and the silicon isotope composition of diatoms (δ30SiBSi) both mainly reflect the degree of past nutrient utilization by primary producers. However, in ocean areas where anoxic and suboxic conditions prevail, the δ15Nbulk signal ultimately recorded within the sediments is also influenced by water column denitrification, causing an increase in the subsurface δ15N signature of dissolved nitrate (δ15NO−3) upwelled to the surface. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Kristin Doering et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-2163-2019

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Fish debris in sediments from the last 25 kyr in the Humboldt Current reveal the role of productivity and oxygen on small pelagic fishes

Abstract.

"Upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Peru sustains the world’s highest production of forage fish, mostly composed of anchovy (Engraulis ringens). However, the potential impacts of climate change on upwelling dynamics and thus fish productivity in the near future are uncertain. Here, we reconstruct past changes in fish populations during the last 25,000 years to unravel their response to changes in OMZ intensity and productivity. [...]"

Source: Progress in Oceanography
Authors: RenatoSalvatteci et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.pocean.2019.05.006

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Multidecadal Changes in Marine Subsurface Oxygenation Off Central Peru During the Last ca. 170 Years

Abstract.

"Subsurface water masses with permanent oxygen deficiency (oxygen minimum zones, OMZ) are typically associated with upwelling regions and exhibit a high sensitivity to climate variability. Over the last decade, several studies have reported a global ocean deoxygenation trend since 1960 and a consequent OMZ expansion. However, some proxy records suggest an oxygenation trend for the OMZ over the margins of the Tropical North East Pacific since ca. 1850. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Jorge Cardich et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00270

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Oxygen minimum zone-type biogeochemical cycling in the Cenomanian-Turonian Proto-North Atlantic across Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

Abstract.

"Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in Earth's history are regarded as analogues for current and future ocean deoxygenation, potentially providing information on its pacing and internal dynamics. In order to predict the Earth system's response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations and radiative forcing, a sound understanding of how biogeochemical cycling differs in modern and ancient marine environments is required. [...]"

Source: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Authors: Florian Scholz et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2019.04.008

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The Equatorial Undercurrent and the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Pacific

Abstract.

"Warming‐driven expansion of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the equatorial Pacific would bring very low oxygen waters closer to the ocean surface, and possibly impact global carbon/nutrient cycles and local ecosystems. Global coarse Earth System Models (ESMs) show, however, disparate trends that poorly constrain these future changes in the upper OMZ. [...]"

Source: Geophysical Research Letters
Authors: Julius J.M. Busecke, Laure Resplandy and John P. Dunne
DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082692

Read the full article here.


Diapycnal dissolved organic matter supply into the upper Peruvian oxycline

Abstract.

"The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) hosts the Peruvian upwelling system, which represents one of the most productive areas in the world ocean. High primary production followed by rapid heterotrophic utilization of organic matter supports the formation of one of the most intense oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the world ocean, where dissolved oxygen (O2) concentrations reach less than 1 µmol kg−1. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Alexandra N. Loginova et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-2033-2019

Read the full article here.


Strong intensification of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone in response to Arabian Gulf warming

Abstract.

"The highly saline, oxygen saturated waters of the Arabian Gulf (hereafter the Gulf) sink to intermediate depths (200‐300m) when they enter the Arabian Sea, ventilating the World's thickest oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Here, we investigate the impacts of a warming of the Gulf consistent with climate change projections on the intensity of this OMZ. Using a series of eddy‐resolving model simulations, we show that the warming of the Gulf waters increases their buoyancy and hence limits their contribution to the ventilation of intermediate depths. [...]"

Source: Geophysical Research Letters
Authors: Z. Lachkar, M. Lévy and S. Smith
DOI: 10.1029/2018GL081631

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