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Stepwise oxygenation of early Cambrian ocean controls early metazoan diversification

Abstract.

"The Ediacaran–Cambrian transition is a critical period in Earth history, during which both marine environment and life experienced drastic changes. It was suggested that pervasive oxygenation and associated chemical changes in the ocean have potentially triggered the rapid diversification of early Cambrian metazoans. The timing and process of ocean oxygenation, however, have not been well constrained. [...]"

Source: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
Authors: Xiangkuan Zhao et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.05.009

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Coupling of oceanic carbon and nitrogen facilitates spatially resolved quantitative reconstruction of nitrate inventories

Abstract.

"Anthropogenic impacts are perturbing the global nitrogen cycle via warming effects and pollutant sources such as chemical fertilizers and burning of fossil fuels. Understanding controls on past nitrogen inventories might improve predictions for future global biogeochemical cycling. Here we show the quantitative reconstruction of deglacial bottom water nitrate concentrations from intermediate depths of the Peruvian upwelling region, using foraminiferal pore density. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Nicolaas Glock et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03647-5

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New insights into Cenomanian paleoceanography and climate evolution from the Tarfaya Basin, southern Morocco

Abstract.

"A 325 m long continuous succession of uppermost Albian to lower Turonian pelagic (outer shelf) deposits was recovered from a new drill site in the central part of the Tarfaya Basin (southern Morocco). Natural gamma ray wireline logging, carbonate and organic carboncontent, bulk carbonate and organic carbon stable isotopes and X-ray fluorescence (XRF)-scanner derived elemental distribution data in combination with planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy indicate complete recovery of the Cenomanian Stage. [...]"

Source: Cretaceous Research
Authors: SebastianBeil et al.
DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2017.11.006

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Deglacial upwelling, productivity and CO2 outgassing in the North Pacific Ocean

Abstract.

"The interplay between ocean circulation and biological productivity affects atmospheric CO2 levels and marine oxygen concentrations. During the warming of the last deglaciation, the North Pacific experienced a peak in productivity and widespread hypoxia, with changes in circulation, iron supply and light limitation all proposed as potential drivers. [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: William R. Gray et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-018-0108-6

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Oxygenation of the Mesoproterozoic ocean and the evolution of complex eukaryotes

Abstract.

"The Mesoproterozoic era (1,600–1,000 million years ago (Ma)) has long been considered a period of relative environmental stasis, with persistently low levels of atmospheric oxygen. There remains much uncertainty, however, over the evolution of ocean chemistry during this period, which may have been of profound significance for the early evolution of eukaryotic life. [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Kan Zhang
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-018-0111-y

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Multiple episodes of extensive marine anoxia linked to global warming and continental weathering following the latest Permian mass extinction

Abstract.

"Explaining the ~5-million-year delay in marine biotic recovery following the latest Permian mass extinction, the largest biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic, is a fundamental challenge for both geological and biological sciences. Ocean redox perturbations may have played a critical role in this delayed recovery. However, the lack of quantitative constraints on the details of Early Triassic oceanic anoxia (for example, time, duration, and extent) leaves the links between oceanic conditions and the delayed biotic recovery ambiguous. [...]"

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Feifei Zhan et al.
DOI:10.1126/sciadv.1602921

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Ocean euxinia and climate change "double whammy" drove the Late Ordovician mass extinction

Abstract.

"The Late Ordovician mass extinction (LOME, ca. 445 Ma) was the first of the "Big Five" Phanerozoic extinction events and comprised two extinction pulses. Proposed kill mechanisms include glacially induced global cooling and the expansion of water-column anoxia and/or euxinia (sulfidic conditions), but no general consensus has been reached with regard to the precise role of these mechanisms. [...]"

Source: Geology
Authors: Caineng Zou et al.
DOI: 10.1130/G40121.1

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Oxic Fe(III) reduction could have generated Fe(II) in the photic zone of Precambrian seawater

Abstract.

"Many marine Precambrian iron formations (IF) record deep anoxic seawater enriched in Fe(II) (i.e. ferruginous) overlain by mildly oxygenated surface water. This is reflected by iron-rich sediments forming in deep basins, and relatively iron-poor sediments forming in shallow, sunlit waters. Such an iron gradient is often interpreted as a redox interface where dissolved Fe(II) was oxidized and precipitated as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. As such, sedimentary iron enrichments are proxy to the progressive oxidation of the oceans through geological time. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reportsvolume
Authors: Elizabeth D. Swanner
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-22694-y

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The influence of the ocean circulation state on ocean carbon storage and CO2 drawdown potential in an Earth system model

Abstract.

"During the four most recent glacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 during glacial maxima has been lowered by about 90–100 ppm with respect to interglacials. There is widespread consensus that most of this carbon was partitioned in the ocean. It is, however, still debated which processes were dominant in achieving this increased carbon storage. In this paper, we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to explore the sensitivity of ocean carbon storage to ocean circulation state. We carry out a set of simulations in which we run the model to pre-industrial equilibrium, but in which we achieve different states of ocean circulation by changing forcing parameters such as wind stress, ocean diffusivity and atmospheric heat diffusivity. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Malin Ödalen et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-15-1367-2018

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Nitrogen fixation sustained productivity in the wake of the Palaeoproterozoic Great Oxygenation Event

Abstract.

"The marine nitrogen cycle is dominated by redox-controlled biogeochemical processes and, therefore, is likely to have been revolutionised in response to Earth-surface oxygenation. The details, timing, and trajectory of nitrogen cycle evolution, however, remain elusive. Here we couple nitrogen and carbon isotope records from multiple drillcores through the Rooihoogte–Timeball Hill Formations from across the Carletonville area of the Kaapvaal Craton where the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE) and its aftermath are recorded. [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Genming Luo
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03361-2

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