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Multiple episodes of extensive marine anoxia linked to global warming and continental weathering following the latest Permian mass extinction

Abstract.

"Explaining the ~5-million-year delay in marine biotic recovery following the latest Permian mass extinction, the largest biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic, is a fundamental challenge for both geological and biological sciences. Ocean redox perturbations may have played a critical role in this delayed recovery. However, the lack of quantitative constraints on the details of Early Triassic oceanic anoxia (for example, time, duration, and extent) leaves the links between oceanic conditions and the delayed biotic recovery ambiguous. [...]"

Source: Science Advances
Authors: Feifei Zhan et al.
DOI:10.1126/sciadv.1602921

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Uranium isotope evidence for an expansion of marine anoxia during the end-Triassic extinction

Abstract.

"The end-Triassic extinction coincided with an increase in marine black shale deposition and biomarkers for photic zone euxinia, suggesting that anoxia played a role in suppressing marine biodiversity. However, global changes in ocean anoxia are difficult to quantify using proxies for local anoxia. Uranium isotopes (δ238U) in CaCO3 sediments deposited under locally well-oxygenated bottom waters can passively track seawater δ238U, which is sensitive to the global areal extent of seafloor anoxia due to preferential reduction of 238U(VI) relative to 235U(VI) in anoxic marine sediments. [...]"

Source: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
Authors: Adam B. Jost et al.
DOI: 10.1002/2017GC006941

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