News

BFAR explains causes of Metro Manila fish kill

"THE  fish kill in the coastal areas of Las Piñas and Parañaque was not caused by blast fishing but from the poor level of oxygen and high levels of ammonia and phosphates in said water body.

Based on the tests conducted by the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources-National Fisheries Laboratory Division and BFAR 4A on the water quality in three sampling areas, it showed that there is a poor level of dissolved oxygen and higher levels of ammonia and phosphates than the standard level. The  sampling areas were in San Dionisio and Bay City, both in Parañaque. [...]"


Using machine learning to understand climate change

Abstract.

"Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture.

To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the atmosphere’s methane cycle. They need to know the size of the inputs—both natural and human—as well as the outputs. They also need to know how long methane resides in the atmosphere.

To help develop this understanding, Tom Weber, an assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester; undergraduate researcher Nicola Wiseman ’18, now a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine; and their colleague Annette Kock at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Germany, used data science to determine how much methane is emitted from the ocean into the atmosphere each year.  [...]"

Source: University of Rochester

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Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events prolonged by phosphorus cycle feedbacks

Abstract.

"Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) document major perturbations of the global carbon cycle with repercussions on the Earth’s climate and ocean circulation that are relevant to understand future climate trends. Here, we compare sedimentation patterns, nutrient cycling, organic carbon accumulation and carbon isotope variability across Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events OAE1a and OAE2 in two drill cores with unusually high sedimentation rates from the Vocontian Basin (southern France) and Tarfaya Basin (southern Morocco). [...]"

Source: Climate of the Past (Preprint)
Authors: Sebastian Beil et al.
DOI: 10.5194/cp-2019-118

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Sensitivities to global change drivers may correlate positively or negatively in a foundational marine macroalga

Abstract.

"Ecological impact of global change is generated by multiple synchronous or asynchronous drivers which interact with each other and with intraspecific variability of sensitivities. In three near-natural experiments, we explored response correlations of full-sibling germling families of the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus towards four global change drivers: elevated CO2 (ocean acidification, OA), ocean warming (OW), combined OA and warming (OAW), nutrient enrichment and hypoxic upwelling. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Balsam Al-Janabi et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51099-8

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Marine nitrogen fixers mediate a low latitude pathway for atmospheric CO2 drawdown

Abstract.

"Roughly a third (~30 ppm) of the carbon dioxide (CO2) that entered the ocean during ice ages is attributed to biological mechanisms. A leading hypothesis for the biological drawdown of CO2 is iron (Fe) fertilisation of the high latitudes, but modelling efforts attribute at most 10 ppm to this mechanism, leaving ~20 ppm unexplained [...]"

Source: Nature Communications 
Authors: Pearse J. Buchanan et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12549-z

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Researchers find global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

"Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture.

To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the atmosphere's methane cycle. They need to know the size of the inputs—both natural and human—as well as the outputs. They also need to know how long methane resides in the atmosphere. [...]"

Source: Phys.org

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Global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

Abstract.

"Oceanic emissions represent a highly uncertain term in the natural atmospheric methane (CH4) budget, due to the sparse sampling of dissolved CH4 in the marine environment. Here we overcome this limitation by training machine-learning models to map the surface distribution of methane disequilibrium (∆CH4). Our approach yields a global diffusive CH4 flux of 2–6TgCH4yr−1 from the ocean to the atmosphere, after propagating uncertainties in ∆CH4 and gas transfer velocity.  [...]"

Source: Nature Communications
Authors: Thomas Weber, Nicola A. Wiseman & Annette Kock 
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12541-7

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Deep Atlantic mysteries unveiled in the face of climate change

"ATLAS is one of these projects you can’t do justice to in a single-page article. For over 3.5 years now, a consortium of multinational industries, SMEs, governments and academia have been sailing across the Atlantic to assess its deep-sea ecosystems. In doing so, they’ve already managed to deeply enhance our understanding of the consequences of climate change as well as inform the development of better management policies and practices. [...]"

Source: Cordis

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Atmosphere–ocean oxygen and productivity dynamics during early animal radiations

Abstract.

"The proliferation of large, motile animals 540 to 520 Ma has been linked to both rising and declining O2 levels on Earth. To explore this conundrum, we reconstruct the global extent of seafloor oxygenation at approximately submillion-year resolution based on uranium isotope compositions of 187 marine carbonates samples from China, Siberia, and Morocco, and simulate O2 levels in the atmosphere and surface oceans using a mass balance model constrained by carbon, sulfur, and strontium isotopes in the same sedimentary successions. [...]"

Source: PNAS
Authors: Tais W. Dahl et al.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1901178116

Read the full article here.