News

Constraining the Oceanic Uptake and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases by Building an Ocean Network of Certified Stations:

The Ocean Component of the Integrated Carbon Observation System, ICOS-Oceans

Abstract.

"The European Research Infrastructure Consortium “Integrated Carbon Observation System” (ICOS) aims at delivering high quality greenhouse gas (GHG) observations and derived data products (e.g., regional GHG-flux maps) for constraining the GHG balance on a European level, on a sustained long-term basis. The marine domain (ICOS-Oceans) currently consists of 11 Ship of Opportunity lines (SOOP – Ship of Opportunity Program) and 10 Fixed Ocean Stations (FOSs) spread across European waters, including the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and the Barents, North, Baltic, and Mediterranean Seas. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Tobias Steinhoff et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00544

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Chinese Scientists Develop Online Monitoring Instruments for Ocean Environmental Safety

"Chinese scientists have developed an online system to monitor marine-biochemical elements, according to Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, who led the project. The research team developed the online monitoring instruments by integrating three measurement modules namely, the chlorophyll module, productivity module and dissolved oxygen module, which are all developed by the team itself. [...]"

Source: Chinese Academy of Sciences

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Ferry in Alaska monitors ocean acidification

"The last two years MV Columbia records the ocean’s vitals every three minutes, along a 1,600-kilometer route through the Inside Passage. This includes the coastal region from Puget Sound to the Alaska Panhandle. The ship measures the sea's temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen content, and carbon dioxide concentration, aiming to monitor ocean acidification. [...]"

Source: Safety4Sea

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Global Perspectives on Observing Ocean Boundary Current Systems

Abstract.

"Ocean boundary current systems are key components of the climate system, are home to highly productive ecosystems, and have numerous societal impacts. Establishment of a global network of boundary current observing systems is a critical part of ongoing development of the Global Ocean Observing System. The characteristics of boundary current systems are reviewed, focusing on scientific and societal motivations for sustained observing. Techniques currently used to observe boundary current systems are reviewed, followed by a census of the current state of boundary current observing systems globally. The next steps in the development of boundary current observing systems are considered, leading to several specific recommendations. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Robert E. Todd et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00423

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NASA targets coastal ecosystems with new space sensor

"NASA has selected a space-based instrument under its Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) portfolio that will make observations of coastal waters to help protect ecosystem sustainability, improve resource management, and enhance economic activity. The selected Geosynchronous Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer (GLIMR) instrument, led by principal investigator Joseph Salisbury at the University of New Hampshire, Durham, will provide unique observations of ocean biology, chemistry, and ecology in the Gulf of Mexico, portions of the southeastern United States coastline, and the Amazon River plume—where the waters of the Amazon River enter the Atlantic Ocean.[...]"

Source: phys.org

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On the Future of Argo: A Global, Full-Depth, Multi-Disciplinary Array

Abstract.

"The Argo Program has been implemented and sustained for almost two decades, as a global array of about 4000 profiling floats. Argo provides continuous observations of ocean temperature and salinity versus pressure, from the sea surface to 2000 dbar. The successful installation of the Argo array and its innovative data management system arose opportunistically from the combination of great scientific need and technological innovation. Through the data system, Argo provides fundamental physical observations with broad societally-valuable applications, built on the cost-efficient and robust technologies of autonomous profiling floats. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Dean Roemmich et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00439

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Integrating Biogeochemistry and Ecology Into Ocean Data Assimilation Systems

Abstract.

"Monitoring and predicting the biogeochemical state of the ocean and marine ecosystems is an important application of operational oceanography that needs to be expanded. The accurate depiction of the ocean’s physical environment enabled by Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) systems, in both real-time and reanalysis modes, is already valuable for various applications, such as the fishing industry and fisheries management. However, most of these applications require accurate estimates of both physical and biogeochemical ocean conditions over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. [...]"

Source: Oceanography
Authors: Pierre Brasseur et al.
DOI: 10.5670/oceanog.2009.80

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Coastal Mooring Observing Networks and Their Data Products: Recommendations for the Next Decade

Abstract.

"Instrumented moorings (hereafter referred to as moorings), which are anchored buoys or an anchored configuration of instruments suspended in the water column, are highly valued for their ability to host a variety of interchangeable oceanographic and meteorological sensors. This flexibility makes them a useful technology for meeting end user and science-driven requirements. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Kathleen Bailey et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00180

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A Three-Dimensional Mapping of the Ocean Based on Environmental Data

Abstract.

"The existence, sources, distribution, circulation, and physicochemical nature of macroscale oceanic water bodies have long been a focus of oceanographic inquiry. Building on that work, this paper describes an objectively derived and globally comprehensive set of 37 distinct volumetric region units, called ecological marine units (EMUs). They are constructed on a regularly spaced ocean point-mesh grid, from sea surface to seafloor, and attributed with data from the 2013 World Ocean Atlas version 2. The point attribute data are the means of the decadal averages from a 57-year climatology of six physical and chemical environment parameters (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate). [...]"

Source: Oceanography
Authors: Roger G. Sayre
DOI: 10.5670/oceanog.2017.116

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Water quality measurements in San Francisco Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1969–2015

Abstract.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a place-based research program in San Francisco Bay (USA) that began in 1969 and continues, providing one of the longest records of water-quality measurements in a North American estuary. Constituents include salinity, temperature, light extinction coefficient, and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, suspended particulate matter, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, silicate, and phosphate.

Source: Scientific Data
Authors: Tara S. Schraga & James E. Cloern
DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2017.98

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