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Spatiotemporal changes of ocean carbon species in the western North Pacific using parameterization technique

Abstract.

"We constructed parameterizations for the estimation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH in the western North Pacific, including Japanese coastal regions. Parameterizations, determined as a function of potential temperature (θ) and dissolved oxygen (DO), provided strong correlations with direct measurements for DIC [the coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.99; the root mean square error (RMSE) = 8.49 µmol kg−1] and pH (R2 = 0.98, RMSE = 0.030). [...]"

Source: Journal of Oceanography
Authors: Yutaka W. Watanabe et al.
DOI: 10.1007/s10872-019-00532-7

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Response of N2O production rate to ocean acidification in the western North Pacific

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification, induced by the increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions, has a profound impact on marine organisms and biogeochemical processes1. The response of marine microbial activities to ocean acidification might play a crucial role in the future evolution of air–sea fluxes of biogenic gases such as nitrous oxide (N2O), a strong GHG and the dominant stratospheric ozone-depleting substance2. Here, we examine the response of N2O production from nitrification to acidification in a series of incubation experiments conducted in subtropical and subarctic western North Pacific. [...]"

Source: Nature Climate Change
Authors: Florian Breider et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0605-7

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The Development and Validation of a Profiling Glider Deep ISFET-Based pH Sensor for High Resolution Observations of Coastal and Ocean Acidification

Abstract.

"Coastal and ocean acidification can alter ocean biogeochemistry, with ecological consequences that may result in economic and cultural losses. Yet few time series and high resolution spatial and temporal measurements exist to track the existence and movement of water low in pH and/or carbonate saturation. Past acidification monitoring efforts have either low spatial resolution (mooring) or high cost and low temporal and spatial resolution (research cruises). [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Grace K. Saba et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00664

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Decadal acidification in Atlantic and Mediterranean water masses exchanging at the Strait of Gibraltar

Abstract.

"Seawater pH is undergoing a decreasing trend due to the absorption of atmospheric CO2, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). Biogeochemical processes occurring naturally in the ocean also change pH and hence, for an accurate assessment of OA, the contribution of the natural component to the total pH variation must be quantified. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Susana Flecha et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-52084-x

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Perspectives on in situ Sensors for Ocean Acidification Research

Abstract.

"As ocean acidification (OA) sensor technology develops and improves, in situ deployment of such sensors is becoming more widespread. However, the scientific value of these data depends on the development and application of best practices for calibration, validation, and quality assurance as well as on further development and optimization of the measurement technologies themselves. Here, we summarize the results of a 2-day workshop on OA sensor best practices held in February 2018, in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, drawing on the collective experience and perspectives of the participants. [...]"

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science
Authors: Akash R. Sastri et al.
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00653

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Defining CO2 and O2 syndromes of marine biomes in the Anthropocene

Abstract.

"Research efforts have intensified to foresee the prospects for marine biomes under climate change and anthropogenic drivers over varying temporal and spatial scales. Parallel with these efforts is the utilization of terminology, such as ‘ocean acidification’ and ‘ocean deoxygenation’, that can foster rapid comprehension of complex processes driving carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) concentrations in the global ocean and thus, are now widely used in discussions within and beyond academia. [...]"

Source: Global Change Biology
Authors: Shannon G. Klein et al.
DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14879

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Sensitivities to global change drivers may correlate positively or negatively in a foundational marine macroalga

Abstract.

"Ecological impact of global change is generated by multiple synchronous or asynchronous drivers which interact with each other and with intraspecific variability of sensitivities. In three near-natural experiments, we explored response correlations of full-sibling germling families of the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus towards four global change drivers: elevated CO2 (ocean acidification, OA), ocean warming (OW), combined OA and warming (OAW), nutrient enrichment and hypoxic upwelling. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: Balsam Al-Janabi et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51099-8

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The Dynamics and Impact of Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia:

Insights from Sustained Investigations in the Northern California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

Abstract.

"Coastal upwelling ecosystems around the world are defined by wind-generated currents that bring deep, nutrient-rich waters to the surface ocean where they fuel exceptionally productive food webs. These ecosystems are also now understood to share a common vulnerability to ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH). In the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME), reports of marine life die-offs by fishers and resource managers triggered research that led to an understanding of the risks posed by hypoxia. Similarly, unprecedented losses from shellfish hatcheries led to novel insights into the coastal expression of ocean acidification. [...]"

Source: Oceanography
Authors: Francis Chan et al.
DOI: 10.5670/oceanog.2019.312

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Flow-driven micro-scale pH variability affects the physiology of corals and coralline algae under ocean acidification

Abstract.

"Natural variability in pH in the diffusive boundary layer (DBL), the discrete layer of seawater between bulk seawater and the outer surface of organisms, could be an important factor determining the response of corals and coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA). Here, two corals with different morphologies and one coralline alga were maintained under two different regimes of flow velocities, pH, and light intensities in a 12 flumes experimental system for a period of 27 weeks. [...]"

Source: Scientific Reports
Authors: S. Comeau et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-49044-w

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Combined effects of ocean acidification and temperature on larval and juvenile growth, development and swimming performance of European sea bass

Abstract.

"Ocean acidification and ocean warming (OAW) are simultaneously occurring and could pose ecological challenges to marine life, particularly early life stages of fish that, although they are internal calcifiers, may have poorly developed acid-base regulation. This study assessed the effect of projected OAW on key fitness traits (growth, development and swimming ability) in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) larvae and juveniles. [...]"

Source: PLoS One
Authors: Louise Cominassi etal.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0221283

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