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Diapycnal dissolved organic matter supply into the upper Peruvian oxycline

Abstract.

"The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) hosts the Peruvian upwelling system, which represents one of the most productive areas in the world ocean. High primary production followed by rapid heterotrophic utilization of organic matter supports the formation of one of the most intense oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the world ocean, where dissolved oxygen (O2) concentrations reach less than 1 µmol kg−1. [...]"

Source: Biogeosciences
Authors: Alexandra N. Loginova et al.
DOI: 10.5194/bg-16-2033-2019

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Flooding Makes Big 'Dead Zone' Off Louisiana Coast Likely

"The year's widespread flooding has made it likely that a big, oxygen-starved "dead zone" off Louisiana's coast will form this summer, the head of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science said Thursday. Preliminary computer model runs "indicate a large to very large year," for the area where there's too little oxygen to support marine life, Steven Thur told the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Task Force during a meeting livestreamed from Baton Rouge. [...]"

Source: The New York Times

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Variations in ocean deoxygenation across Earth System Models: Isolating the role of parametrized lateral mixing

Abstract.

"Modern Earth System Models (ESMs) disagree on the impacts of anthropogenic global warming on the distribution of oxygen and associated low‐oxygen waters. A sensitivity study using the GFDL CM2Mc model points to the representation of lateral mesoscale eddy transport as a potentially important factor in such disagreement. Because mesoscale eddies are smaller than the spatial scale of ESM ocean grids, their impact must be parameterized using a lateral mixing coefficient AREDI. [...]"

Source: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Authors: A. Bahl, A. Gnanadesikan and M.‐A. Pradal
DOI: 10.1029/2018GB006121

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AGU Fall Meeting 2019

As AGU marks its Centennial in 2019, we return to San Francisco, the home of the Fall Meeting for more than 40 years. Join our diverse community at the newly renovated Moscone Center as we collaborate across borders and boundaries to explore and develop our research. Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to participate in Centennial presentations and special events that will bring to life the past, present and the future of our science.

Today we experience "Science at the Speed of Life." Fall Meeting will prepare you for what’s ahead: rapid developments in our science, new approaches to observing our Earth and beyond, the introduction of new data streams, growing demand for accessible science, the expansion of convergent science, and more. There is no better place than Fall Meeting to look into the future and develop your skills and your understanding of other disciplines at the same time.

At Fall Meeting, we will draw inspiration from each other and will show how earth and space science enables a more resilient and sustainable future for all.

Read more about the conference on the official website.


../common/calendar Start Date: 12/8/19

World Congress  on Climate Change

2nd World Congress  on Climate Change will be held during September 26-28, 2019 at Berlin, Germany.Climate Change-2019 is an excellent platform for professionals and who are working in the field.

The annual conference creates a platform for experts interaction, simultaneously with networking opportunities and also provides an opportunity to explore the innovative ideas of the other communities, companies and associations.Climate Change -2019 conference includes Plenary lectures, Keynote lectures and short courses by eminent personalities from around the world in addition to contributed papers both oral and poster presentations.

It aims to discover advances, practical experiences and innovative ideas on issues related to Climate Change as well as a breadth of other topics. Don t miss this opportunity to connect with your peers at this scientific event. Your participation in the conference will enhance your knowledge and professional skills.

This International Conference on Climate Change is a gathering of experts, professionals, academicians and researchers from all over the world. Meet experts, strengthen and update your ideas at Climate change-2019.

Read more about the conference on the official website.

 


../common/calendar Start Date: 9/25/19

International Conference on Paleoceanography

The conference will be hosted at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). UNSW is located close to one of the most iconic beaches in Australia and a short bus ride away from Sydney's central business district.

Following the traditional ICP format, the conference will be organised around invited plenary oral presentations as well as large and vibrant poster sessions. Networking will be at the centre of the ICP, with numerous social events including the Paleomusicology concert and conference dinner.

The lively city of Sydney has a rich cultural heritage and offers adventure and entertainment for all ages and tastes. Breathtaking coastal national parks, the Blue Mountains and the Hunter Valley, known for Australia’s finest wines, are only a daytrip away.

A range of existing pre- and post- Conference field trips will be organised in New South Wales, New Zealand and potentially the Great Barrier Reef. For those with time for exploring, Sydney is the gateway to iconic travel locations including the Great Barrier Reef, Uluru, and Kakadu National Park.

Read more about the conference on the official website.

 


../common/calendar Start Date: 9/1/19

Oceans 2019

OCEANS is the bi-annual event for global marine technologists, engineers, students, government officials, lawyers, and advocates. These industry thought leaders gather for four days to highlight relevant topics and current trends, while creating a community of learners and influencers who consistently advance research, practices, and policies for the marine field.

The Marine Technology Society and the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society partner to present OCEANS, and this prestigious conference and exhibition draws an audience of more than 2,000 attendees:

  • Over 800 professionally reviewed technical papers, including sessions focused on local themes.
  • Plenary sessions with leaders from industry, academia, the military and government.
  • 100+ exhibitors showcasing the latest innovations in products and services.
  • A student poster session featuring outstanding projects from around the world and other student activities.
  • Tutorials, workshops, demonstrations, government listening sessions, social and networking opportunities, professional field trips …and much, much more

Read more about OCEANS on the official website.


../common/calendar Start Date: 6/16/19

Periodic changes in the Cretaceous ocean and climate caused by marine redox see-saw

Abstract.

"Periodic changes in sediment composition are usually ascribed to insolation forcing controlled by Earth’s orbital parameters. During the Cretaceous Thermal Maximum at 97–91 Myr ago (Ma), a 37–50-kyr-long cycle that is generally believed to reflect obliquity forcing dominates the sediment record.  [...]"

Source: Nature Geoscience
Authors: Klaus Wallmann et al.
DOI: 10.1038/s41561-019-0359-x

Read the full article here.


Vision is highly sensitive to oxygen availability in marine invertebrate larvae

Abstract.

"For many animals, evolution has selected for complex visual systems despite the high energetic demands associated with maintaining eyes and their processing structures. The metabolic demands of visual systems therefore make them highly sensitive to fluctuations in available oxygen. In the marine environment, oxygen changes over daily, seasonal, and inter-annual time scales and there are large gradients of oxygen with depth. [...]"

Source: Journal of Experimental Biology
Auhtors: Lillian R. McCormick, Lisa A. Levin and Nicholas W. Oesch
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.200899

Read the full article here.


Neoproterozoic to early Phanerozoic rise in island arc redox state due to deep ocean oxygenation and increased marine sulfate levels

Abstract.

"A rise in atmospheric O2 levels between 800 and 400 Ma is thought to have oxygenated the deep oceans, ushered in modern biogeochemical cycles, and led to the diversification of animals. Over the same time interval, marine sulfate concentrations are also thought to have increased to near-modern levels. We present compiled data that indicate Phanerozoic island arc igneous rocks are more oxidized (Fe3+/ΣFe ratios are elevated by 0.12) vs. Precambrian equivalents. [...]"

Source: PNAS
Authors: Daniel A. Stolper and Claire E. Bucholz
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1821847116

Read the full article here.


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